WinCC

How do you backup your data ?

How du you backup ?  

79 members have voted

  1. 1. I backup to a:

    • External HD
      31
    • Internal HD
      17
    • Tape Drive
      5
    • Network Server
      15
    • CD / DVD
      8
    • Floppy
      0
    • Backup ?? I have a life without my data
      3


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I have 2 external HDD's for backup. A 1 TB WD My Book, which is NOT connected to my pc.

Then I have a WD Studio Edt. 2TB, which is connected to my system.

I also back my most important files up on DVD's and also in some cases have important docs on 2 16GB USB flash drives for extra extra beackup :ph34r:

So far it works out OK.

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My main system get's Ghosted in DOS to an external USB drive.

My NAS has a duplicate set of internal daily synced mirrors (no RAID). Then monthly all the data is archived to an external eSATA drive and kept off-site in a fire-proof safe.

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I use external drives, but am hoping to sort out an internal RAID 1 array which will also give me a backup which is easier to recover from in the event of a failure.

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My data is worth what its worth and to me its alot. i backup all my data on a 2nd drive (if i buy a 1tb drive for use i buy another 1tb drive to back up that one) which is then stored not used and in another location in case of problems with the 1st drive.(and no i dont work for any hard drive company gettin peeps to buy more hard drives).

This works for me and has saved my data on a few occasions

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I backup each of my internal hard drives to a separate, larger (ideally would be at least twice as large) capacity internal hard drive with Ghost 14. Full drive images. Daily incremental, weekly bases.

Edited by coyote

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All of my stuff is backed up to a networked server with RAID.

Before I started working here I had a setup with a few drives in a server, important stuff just placed on multiple drives. Then I got a few drives thrown my way and I had a RAID1 1TB array and a RAID1 2TB array on an Ubuntu server. Now since we are continuously working on home/business NAS units, I am borrowing a Synology filled with spare 2TB drives for a 5.4TB RAID5 array.

One day I will transition to Amazon S3 for the important stuff (family photos) but for now RAID does the job.

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Hi,

I recommend backing up to an external hard drive.You should back up every day that you use your computer. An intelligent backup program will, on most days, simply back up files that have been created or changed since the last backup.

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Docs, music, software, photos are backed up once every 1-2 days thru Syncback Pro to 2 disks (one internal and one e-SATA). Photos are backed up on 3-4 different disks (size is 20-25 GB so that hardly matters). Hardly takes 2 mins for syncback to complete its backup (mirror).

C: is backed up with an image made with Acronis WD edition (free). This is done on a daily basis, and the 2nd last image is refreshed/updated every week (and then backed up) and becomes the first image for the subsequent week. Keeps my PC fresh and removes most of the garbage accumulated during the week and not cleaned by regular cleaners.

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Sensitive data is also striped, mirrored and encrypted on my laptop and my web space. Really important stuff is stored here at the University of RAID6 getting daily backups of AIT-4 tapes that are stored in two separate buildings.

So envious...:(

I wish there was a company out that that would loan tape systems to make backups yourself, and then either store your tapes for you or let you stick them where you please. that way you dont have to deal with purchasing or maintaining a $$$ tape system.

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My main storage is SAS RAID5, backed up to another RAID5 array in a different machine monthly and also backed up to external SATA drives. A smaller amount of 'Important stuff' is backed up to an external drive and rotated to an offsite location quarterly.

My OS drives are backed up to the RAID arrays.

Cheap storage is great. over 6TB for what I paid for my first BIG drive and controller, an ST251-1 and a WD MM2

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I have a number of customers back up to DVD-RW's that they rotate weekly. The last week of each month is sent to an offsite storage location. There have been cases where there was corrupt data (due to software problems) where we had to go back nine months to get to clean backup. It wasn't noticed until tax time that there were inconsistencies in their accounting software.

One of the options on the poll should be "To the Internet" or "The Cloud"

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Just a weekly cron job to backup /home, /root, /etc and /opt to my VXA-1 tape drive... and a 6monthly job for the whole lot... (roughly 80GB).

And yes I just use tar!

Ugh - memories. I suppose you probably still use vi too.

I used to work on a bunch of SCO System 5 Unix/Xenix boxes many years ago. I suspect I probably have some machines in an office closet somewhere still running that have been forgotten about but have not yet gone down. I remember the first time I tried to upgrade one to work with a 1 gigabyte Hitachi drive - it took some effort at the time.

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Enterprise still uses tape, in the client area, I can't imagine anyone does. I stopped using an old hand-me-down tape system 15 years ago. Now I just use a stack of floppies that reaches to the ceiling. ;)

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Tape is a reasonably robust way to take a backup, stick it in a suitcase and transport it offsite. When you have many terabytes of data, it can be somewhat cost effective. Backup over the network to a SAN in another building/site is better, but that requires having another site, having a lot of bandwidth to that site, and being able to afford enough SAN storage to store all your backups. Compression and deduplication technologies can help, but it still works out very expensive vs. taking some tapes and sticking them in a cupboard (or even a fire safe) at the other site.

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