Shining Arcanine

Home Network Attached Storage

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I need more space than I have on my desktop for Windows Media Center's recordings, as each recording takes up about 1.1 GB for every thirty minutes, so I have a bit of a storage problem. I find myself needing to delete old episodes of programs I enjoy, to save space for newer episodes but I would really like to have every episode of every program recorded. I have already set Windows Media Center's recording quality to "Good," which is lower than "Better" and Best, and is the lowest quality setting where the image quality is where I consider it to be acceptable. Microsoft only allows people to use MPEG2 compression on their videos so that is not an option.

I am thinking of spending about $200 to $300 to resolve this, but my ears are very sensitive and my PC is in my room, so adding another hard drive in my PC is not an option. Because of that, I am considering Network Attached Storage as a solution to my storage problem. My home network is a wireless/wired hybrid network using a linksys WRT54GS v2.1 router. Its wireless component uses 256bit AES WPA2 encryption with a mac address whitelist. If I go with NAS, I would like to put it in another room, either by running ethernet cables through the walls (if my parents will let me) or by connecting to the wireless component of my home network. Does anyone have any suggestions for what I should consider?

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yeah, you should consider installing 300GB 7k2 harddisks into your windows media PC as this drives are quit and inexpensive. if this is a noise problem for you (what i definetly cannot understand as these drives are very quit both idle and load, especially new seagate drives, i got some here) go with 2.5" drives, probably 120GB will give you the most GB/$. if this is still to loud for you, go with a 2.5" 4200rpm drive. if this not an option for you either (how can you hear a 2.5" 4k2 hdd in a working PC on 1 meter distance??? or are you talking bout your dog... :) ), spend ALOT of money for a NAS device, or build a fileserver by using an old PIII-500 machine, installing linux and a sambaserver and 7k2 drives as much as needded (best option for you and your budget though).

and go wired 100MBit... :rolleyes:

Edited by ssc#

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My ears are 10 decibels more sensitive than normal according to one doctor I have visited. My computer has three sources of noise. The case fan, the CPU fan and the hard drive. The fans operate are designed for low noise operation and operate at low RPMs (the 92mm CPU fan at 875 RPM and the 120mm case fan at 1200 RPM). Tthe hard drive makes by far the most noise and I do not want another one of them in my computer. If I had another one, I would not be able to sleep. I have a 2.5" 100GB Hitachi drive in my laptop and it generates more noise than my desktop. Thankfully, it is a notebook so I do not need to have it run 24x7 like I do with my Media Center PC.

I am thinking of getting one of these:

http://www.wdc.com/en/products/products.as...243&language=en

The street price is $302.52, but at the rate that hard drive prices are declining, I should be able to get one for $250 in four months. Does anyone know if these are able to appear as shared folders as if they were being shared over the network on another Windows PC or if these use a non-standard data storage method?

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Guest 888

There's one warning: These NetCenter combos have been relatively very slow in their data transfer rate. Some real tests are showing 5...7 MB/s only! However, this is not surprising because of these combos use 100 Mbps ethernet, not 1 Gbps. Taking into account all of the ethernet protocol overheads and losses, it's just that! For ensuring the full throughput 60...80 MB/s (max) of contemporary HDD the gigabit ethernet is needed and even it is just so-so. One review (320GB version):

http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/storage/d...-netcenter.html

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My ears are 10 decibels more sensitive than normal according to one doctor I have visited.

A few suggestions:

1. Don't forget to cool the drives, and note that bigger fans are generally quieter, and not widely available in small consumer drive enclosures.

2. Consider quietening your box down further. Did you consider the PSU? The design of the case itself?

3. Go to Silent PC Review to get input from other noise-sensitive people.

4. Look at inexpensive desktops made by large manufacturers; some of these are cheap; some of these are quiet; even if not quiet, they can of course serve files remotely, probably faster than most current consumer NAS boxes.

5. Run a wire along/through the walls if you can.

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One word of advise: Don't go for anything less than a gigabit/esata support. USB,FW400,100Mbit connections will kill you. (FW800 might do ok, but it's not widely supported)

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i see no problem with a well working 100MBit connection. i remember getting about 80% of 100MBit from my old fileserver, and it was an old CE machine with ECS kt133 board and the conn was between 2 3com xl cards (in other words: almost scrap). gigabit is nice to have (ftc. you know howto configure it right), but to stream less then 1MB/s you seriously dont need it.

and, btw, adding a 2nd drive of the same type does not necessary mean it gets any louder, especially when you have a silenced case. :)

Edited by ssc#

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I'm a big fan of gigabit for file transfers. In general, I think a migration to gigabit makes sense -- when you purchase new networking equipment, might as well make it gigabit for an eventual migration. But, in this case, the OP is on a budget and has other needs and priorities.

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Could remote mount the whole computer and access it from the laptop using remote desktop software. Then either turn off the laptop for silence or use one of those IDE to compactflash adapters to make a poor man's SSD workstation out of it.

Just trying to put your current equipment to best use and avoid buying of equipment if possible...

I mounted my HTPC desktop outdoors and can't hear it at all even though it's only three feet away, is a P4 and has 15k drives.

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