KingGremlin

Seagate announces 750GB Barracuda 7200.10

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That's a pretty impressive 50% increase over the current largest drive. Too bad it's Seagate. The race is now on to see what will happen first, the first working Star Trek transporter is demonstrated, or one of these drives is seen for sale somewhere. It's a PDF file as there is no web page for it yet:

http://www.seagate.com/docs/pdf/datasheet/...uda_7200_10.pdf

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Off only 4 platters? DAMN.

Yeah, the actual ship date would be nice. I'm sure if I called now I could get a few samples, but I wonder if I could actually get enough (20) for testing...

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Guest 888

Ok, I'm also moving now here on the official topic, from the pre-release unofficial topic ;)

So, really, Seagate already did it! That was a really unexpectedly fast surprise!

Yeah, true, that's just 750GB now, not 700GB as was earlier expected (probably they changed their initial plans in some point of process). But yes, just, there's 4-platter 750GB, 3-platter 500GB, 3(but not 2)-platter 400GB models. And now, additionally, 2-platter 320GB (yes, Seagate also goes over to the 320GB capacity point!) and also not-so interesting short-stroked 2-platter 300/250/200 GB models!

http://www.seagate.com/products/details/0,,4,00.html

http://www.seagate.com/docs/pdf/marketing/...uda_7200_10.pdf

http://www.seagate.com/docs/pdf/datasheet/...uda_7200_10.pdf

(as you see from the latest pdf, Seagate now officially also announces their platters/heads counts in every model specs!)

The only confusing thing is 400GB model - its model number refers to 2 platters but specs list it as 3 platter drive. May-be they plan to go over to 2-platter version in nearest future. In fact they must have already at least 187,5GB platters now, because of otherwise the 750GB 4-platter drive isn't possible. But I think they are max.200GB platters still...

And yes, they are using perpendicular recording technology!

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Guest 888

Oops, sorry for couple of broken links (caused by my screen copy-paste), here are corrected:

http://www.seagate.com/products/details/0,,4,00.html

http://www.seagate.com/docs/pdf/marketing/...uda_7200_10.pdf

http://www.seagate.com/docs/pdf/datasheet/...uda_7200_10.pdf

750GB - 4 platters / 8 heads - 16MB cache

500GB - 3 platters / 6 heads - 16MB cache

400GB - 3 platters / 5 heads - 16MB cache (in future may-be 2 platters / 4 heads)

320GB - 2 platters / 4 heads - 16MB cache (ATA has additionally also 300GB, too)

250GB - 2 platters / 3 heads - 16MB and 8MB cache versions (ATA has 8MB only)

200GB - 2 platters / 3 heads - 8MB cache

Available in SATA300 and ATA versions (except when noted).

So-called full (with paired heads) versions are 750GB, 500GB, 320GB. In binary gigabytes they are 698GiB, 465GiB, 298GiB (of which the first and last could be rounded almost like 700GiB and 300GiB).

And now, interesting, would the next Seagate drive really be 960GB what was discussed in some sources already?

Edited by 888

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Guest 888

However, it's interesting to note that if I go on Seagate's Website's "Personal Storage" root-page

http://www.seagate.com/products/personal

there's "404 Error: File Not Found"

But in fact all datasheets with the new 7200.10 information are still existing there if to use direct URLs...

This error appeared just beginning from yesterday. May-be they are blocking the pre-pressrelease browsing of their new surprise drives ;)

Edited by 888

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When this drive finally mainstream, what do you guys think the price of a 250/300GB drive will be?

Phil

about $50.

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Guest 888
That page shows up fine for me, so maybe they were redoing the site while you were trying. Nothing about trying to block or hide or be sneaky ;-)

You were right, now it's back online, and redesigned with the new 750GB statement. That's after some 24 hours of totally page missing - shame on their superslow webmaster...

But at the present moment the next page ("Barracuda > Learn More") is missing... ugh..

And the direct page I linked here above earlier

http://www.seagate.com/products/details/0,,4,00.html

has now all the 7200.10 models deleted from the list!!!

Ok, lets give them some time now...

Anyway, it's very weird webmastering strategy for such a major company like Seagate...

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Guest 888
So whats the estimated platter density jump?

From 160GB platters to 188GB platters (or 200GB platters)... still not much yet. But it's just a start of perpendicular recording era! Seagate has talked about having much higher densities already ready for production...

However, for this new 7200.10 they announce the "Maximum Sustained Data Transfer Rate = 78 MB/s". It's only +5 MB/s over current 7200.9 160GB (160GB platters) model. And that's pretty logical for this platter density jump.

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Guest 888

When this drive finally mainstream, what do you guys think the price of a 250/300GB drive will be?

about $50.

I don't think so low. There's a lowest limit below what no HDD will go because of production economy. This limit is just $40...50 and it is for 1-platter drives.

320GB drives cost today $110...125, 300GB drives $100...120, 250GB drives $80...100. Yes, their prices could go down even more but I think they all will finally stay somewhere between $65...$85.

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400GB - 3 platters / 5 heads - 16MB cache (in future may-be 2 platters / 4 heads)

That wouldn't be too surprising. It's well known that it is much easier to use higher density platters when less of them are involved, hence 1/2-platter drives can well have higher density platters than their 3/4-platter counterparts before running into problems.

Also, I disagree with your assumption on the 250/300GB drive price issue. I think JPWRana is right, as by the time 750GB drives are mainstream, they will be in the same category that 80-120GB drives are now - about 1/3rd of the "mainstream" capacity, and thus will be priced accordingly. That would be in about 1.5-3 years time, at which point I wouldn't be surprised if 300GB platters were around, putting 250/300GB within reach of an economy single-platter design, costing no more than $50.

And, 888, can you please try to avoid triple posting. Double-posting is bad enough. There was absolutely no need to make three consecutive posts there.

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Really need 3 platter 600gb's or even "low cost" 2 platter 400gbs - that would be nice

I'd like to see Seagate release a single platter 150gb or so to compete with the Raptor X too but I doubt that's gonna happen

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So whats the estimated platter density jump?

From 160GB platters to 188GB platters (or 200GB platters)... still not much yet. But it's just a start of perpendicular recording era! Seagate has talked about having much higher densities already ready for production...

However, for this new 7200.10 they announce the "Maximum Sustained Data Transfer Rate = 78 MB/s". It's only +5 MB/s over current 7200.9 160GB (160GB platters) model. And that's pretty logical for this platter density jump.

Hitachi announced a better transfert rate with only 167GB platter without P-Recording. If these numbers are true, why bump density without performance increase ???

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There is rumor that a 960GB is in the works at Seagate.

What company in their right mind would be making a 960GB drive when 1TB is so close?

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Hitachi announced a better transfert rate with only 167GB platter without P-Recording. If these numbers are true, why bump density without performance increase ???

Because density increases can be achieved by increasing the number of sectors/track and the number of tracks.

The second one doesn't cause an increase in STR.

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Guest 888

There is rumor that a 960GB is in the works at Seagate.

What company in their right mind would be making a 960GB drive when 1TB is so close?

There may be some marketing hints involved. I don't know what just. But simply speculating now... they may release that 960GB and then may-be a week later, using big advertising projects, also releasing 1TB which could be in fact the same drive, only platters' free end is formatted a bit more far. But then they could sell the 960GB unit at reasonable (normal) price intended for more tech people, but putting at the same time an extra price premium on that 1TB unit, to sell it to the "happy" customers who are just more interested in that magical number (saying to the friend: "see, my computer has 1TB HDD in!"). It is something like the new Raptor's two versions, in traditional packaging vs. with clear window... I think the average Joe is ready to pay whatever to get just that famous 1TB drive. But storage people even like more 960GB capacity because of it is better "in-system" with currently available RAID-storage servers made of 12x80GB=960GB or 6x160GB=960GB. Also, 3x320GB=960GB, and this 320 is going to be the most popular capacity point now (WD, plus upcoming Hitachi and Seagate - their best price/capacity ratio drives).

(That's all just my own free-form speculation only, just like a fairy-tale)

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I'm just glad to see ATA will be continuing as a interface option on the next generation of drives. Should give FS something to talk about when my 5 yo Compaq is sporting 3 TB INSIDE. :P

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