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Hitachi Announces New Deskstar HDDs

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Guest 888

Yeah, looks very promising series indeed!

At first, there's nice all-covering capacity selection in pretty logical row:

80, 160, 250, 320, 400, 500 GB

of which the basic models are:

160, 320, 500 GB (1, 2, 3 platters accordingly)

and short-stroked versions are:

250, 400 GB

and one-head/one-platterside model is:

80 GB

This 160GB 1-platter model will be a strong competitor to the current Seagate 7200.9 160GB 1-platter flagship.

But it's a completely new thing to get 500GB in 3 platters and 320GB in 2 platters! What Seagate was unable to do, Hitachi did now!

Now there's very real possibilities we will get the world's fastest 320GB and 500GB drives soon!

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Don't they already have the fastest 500GB drives now? In single user mode (unless the WD is faster)

What about the 7K500, will they disappear?

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Hitachi was always number one in platter density up to the 7K250... The 7K500 and T7K250 were announced after Seagate's 7200.8/9... But today I think that Hitachi made a new aggressive return... As 160Gb/platter + good firmware + fastests accuator would really a good deal for performace.

My 2 7K80 will soon have replacement :D

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Guest 888
Don't they already have the fastest 500GB drives now? In single user mode (unless the WD is faster)

What about the 7K500, will they disappear?

Yes they have (they had, because of WD5000KS or MaXLine Pro500 may be probably faster now). But these 7K500 are based on slower 100GB platters. Now they put 166GB ones in and if they could keep Hitachi's always good trademark fast seek times then the new baby would be a very attractive one...

As their press releases are stating, the current 7K500 will not disappear yet. So are also the other current series (only the oldest 7K250 series production is ceased already now). BTW, Hitachi had total of 5 press releases today. Others are talking about installing their 500GB drives into video equipment, professional cinema (film) projectors, etc. Also they are implementing the same series drives with lower noise, intended for home theatre and video players. And very probably these new drive series would come from Hitachi's new factory in Shenzhen, China.

And now, thanks to Hitachi's fast webmasters, we already have all datasheets for these upcoming models! I compiled a small overview table here:

Deskstar T7K500 SATA2 16 NCQ	 500/400/320/250/---/--- HDT7250..DLA360
Deskstar T7K500 SATA2  8 NCQ	 500/400/320/250/---/--- HDT7250..DLA380
Deskstar T7K500  ATA   8		 500/400/320/250/---/--- HDT7250..DLAT80
Deskstar  7K160 SATA2  8 NCQ	 ---/---/---/---/160/080 HDS7216..PLA380
Deskstar  7K160  ATA   8		 ---/---/---/---/160/080 HDS7216..PLAT80

Capacity = Platters/Heads:

080GB = 1 / 1

160GB = 1 / 2 (basic model) 7K160

250GB = 2 / 3

320GB = 2 / 4 (basic model) T7K500

400GB = 3 / 5

500GB = 3 / 6 (basic model) T7K500

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I think 7K80/7K400 will soon be legacy as 80Go/platter is really outdated so that the SATA150 TCQ bridged interface.

For the T7K250, I think it will soon replaced by the new T7K500... But as my new T7K250 was made in March 2006, I think stocks was filled recently.

I think 7K160/T7K500 will in the next months the productline of Hitachi, with 7K500 for continuing supporting Nearline application, but I think a bigger ~700GB will soon be introduced with the 'K' five-platter design.

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Umm, to be honest, I wouldn't use those drives as my OS drive anyway. More as data storage. So I would value reliability + lower £/GB more than increased performance...

Not that I would turn down better performance, mind ya :D

Edited by TooNice

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Guest 888
I think 7K160/T7K500 will in the next months the productline of Hitachi, with 7K500 for continuing supporting Nearline application, but I think a bigger ~700GB will soon be introduced with the 'K' five-platter design.

I'm also sure these new series would become the powerline of Hitachi's HDD production. Hitachi just has it all now:

1. World's fastest seek-time technology;

2. World's fastest sequential reading 166GB platters;

3. World's probably best HDD firmware applications for single user scenario;

4. Good disk management tools software and many configuration options for their HDDs;

5. Many other unique features (head parking ramp, head flying height adjustment, etc.).

And I'm still hoping there would be the first 500+ GB drive just from Hitachi. Although we have discussed (on SR forum here) about impossibility to use over 1 or 2 HD (160GB and more) platters in one assembly...but now we see Hitachi did 3 x 166 and so I do not see any very hard barrier not to implement also 4th and may-be even 5th similar platter into the same drive (and Hitachi sure knows how to make reliable 5-platter drives today!) and so, why not, we could really see just exactly 640GB and 800GB drives soon!

BTW, In their recent press releases Hitachi wrote also about their new upcoming NearLine drives series but without any more details revealed yet!

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Hmmm... It's been quiet for a while here on SR. Might there be a review under process... WD5000xx and/or an early sample of T7K500 under NDA? Is there a 500GB round-up on it's way?

If there's an early sample of T7K500, that's is very early indeed, considering the claim it to be widely available in 3Q this year but not before. 3 to 6 months before one could find one on the shelf of a local retailer.

_________

The specs for the new T7K500 seems very promising. I hope they're not too optimistic. So far, Hitachi has been quite honest if not even humble in their specifications.

In addition to faster sequential transfer rates, what these new drive's is likely to offer is easier integratability to low noise (= low air flow) systems.

T7K500 500GB (3 disk) has 6W (PATA) and 7W (SATA).

T7K500 320GB (2 disk) has 5W (PATA) and 6W (SATA).

7K400/7K500 (5 disk) has 9W (PATA) and 9,6W (SATA).

7K250 250GB (3 disk) has 7W.

7K250 160GB (2 disk) has 5.9W.

T7K250 (2 disk) has 5.2W (PATA) and 6.2W (SATA).

SR's power measurements: 7K400 and 7K500 both SATA, 8.5W. T7K250 SATA, 6.1W.

Look's promising on both 320 and 500GB capacity points.

________

888 said: "BTW, In their recent press releases Hitachi wrote also about their new upcoming NearLine drives series but without any more details revealed yet!"

Maybe they pull the same stunt what Maxtor did before, when they annouced MaXLine +II even though MaXLine +I has never existed. They just retroactively claimed D740X was manufactured with elevated standards and was "MaXLine" even if it was never marketed as such.

Hitachi's annoucement said: "Hitachi will continue to provide its award-winning Deskstar 7K500 for customers that require extended operation and higher duty cycles. These 500 GB drives include enterprise-class features that enhance reliability for nearline storage applications..."

Was this the first time they actually implied 7K500 to be nearline? (Then again: it IS possible. Most likely they didn't want to advetise 7K500 as nearline, because they have their 10K300 SCSI for enterprice market.)

Edited by whiic

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Guest 888
888 said: "BTW, In their recent press releases Hitachi wrote also about their new upcoming NearLine drives series but without any more details revealed yet!"

Maybe they pull the same stunt what Maxtor did before, when they annouced MaXLine +II even though MaXLine +I has never existed. They just retroactively claimed D740X was manufactured with elevated standards and was "MaXLine" even if it was never marketed as such.

Hitachi's annoucement said: "Hitachi will continue to provide its award-winning Deskstar 7K500 for customers that require extended operation and higher duty cycles. These 500 GB drives include enterprise-class features that enhance reliability for nearline storage applications..."

Was this the first time they actually implied 7K500 to be nearline? (Then again: it IS possible. Most likely they didn't want to advetise 7K500 as nearline, because they have their 10K300 SCSI for enterprice market.)

I also do not remember that Hitachi ever earlier had announced their 7K500 as a NearLine drive.

But now in their one of yesterday's press releases they wrote:

"A new portfolio of 3.5-inch products delineated by application segment will help to steer customers toward the right product for their needs:

* Deskstar – mainstream PCs, workstations and entry server applications

* CinemaStar – digital video recorders

* New product and branding for nearline storage applications"

May-be this third one is just that recently re-branded old 7K500 model, may-be something more...

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Maybe they pull the same stunt what Maxtor did before, when they annouced MaXLine +II even though MaXLine +I has never existed. They just retroactively claimed D740X was manufactured with elevated standards and was "MaXLine" even if it was never marketed as such.

And Maxtor was right to say that the Maxtor DiamondMax Plus D740X could be the Maxtor MaXLine Plus... In fact these drives were on of the most reliable for a Deskstop ATA 7200rpm, thanks to Quantum technology I think. Me and a friend of mine acquire each one D740X and after 4 years of 24/24 use as a System drive, no pbs... But in this times some Maxtor DiamondMax Plus 9 and IBM/Hitachi (pre-7Kxxx) RIP...

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According to SR's Reliability Survey: " DiamondMax D740X, Third quarter 2001, 560 comments, 56 percentile". It's just slightly above average (well within margin of error, I'd say). It's true that other 7200rpm Maxtors have very low percentiles (especially the MaXLines!, the "enterprice" variants), but comparing to non-Maxtors, drives like 120GXP and 7K250 are about the same. 180GXP (manufactured between 120GXP and 7K250) has a percentile of 87, yet I've not heard that DeskStar being nearline.

All Seagates before the unfortunate 7200.8, had very high percentiles:

Barracuda ATA III, 88

Barracuda ATA IV, 82

Barracuda ATA V, 90

Barracuda 7200.7, 85

Yet, all old Barracudas aren't considered nearline. Only the NL35 is.

Let's see... maybe the Kurofune series (5-platter design) will receive a new name. Kurofune (Black Ship) (5-platter) => nearline, and Vancouver (2-3-platter) => desktop?

BTW, what's the factory nickname for 7K80 and 7K160, the one-platter variants made in China? (Prior to 7K80, the one-platter variants used outer casings from Vancouver design.)

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According to SR's Reliability Survey: " DiamondMax D740X, Third quarter 2001, 560 comments, 56 percentile". It's just slightly above average (well within margin of error, I'd say). It's true that other 7200rpm Maxtors have very low percentiles (especially the MaXLines!, the "enterprice" variants), but comparing to non-Maxtors, drives like 120GXP and 7K250 are about the same. 180GXP (manufactured between 120GXP and 7K250) has a percentile of 87, yet I've not heard that DeskStar being nearline.

All Seagates before the unfortunate 7200.8, had very high percentiles:

Barracuda ATA III, 88

Barracuda ATA IV, 82

Barracuda ATA V, 90

Barracuda 7200.7, 85

Yet, all old Barracudas aren't considered nearline. Only the NL35 is.

Let's see... maybe the Kurofune series (5-platter design) will receive a new name. Kurofune (Black Ship) (5-platter) => nearline, and Vancouver (2-3-platter) => desktop?

BTW, what's the factory nickname for 7K80 and 7K160, the one-platter variants made in China? (Prior to 7K80, the one-platter variants used outer casings from Vancouver design.)

Before, in 120GXP/180GXP and perhaps in 7K250, the one platter were named Vancouver LP...

In fact actual the letter is "P" and PF in firmare. The funnest thing is that T7K250 is named Vancouver 4 according to the Firmware but the letter in model number is "D". :D

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You probably mean this D: HDT722525DLA380

Here's some other model numbers:

7K250 SATA, 8MB: HDS722525VLSA80

7K400 SATA, 8MB: HDS724040KLSA80

7K500 SATA2, 16MB: HDS725050KLA360

T7K500 250GB SATA2, 8MB: HDT725025DLA380

T7K500 500GB SATA2, 15MB: HDT725025DLA360

They're pretty easy to understand. I find understanding the model numbers of other manufacturers' drives harder. Well, maybe WDs are an exception, but then again: they sell many variants under the same model#, varying platter counts, etc.

HDT722525DLA380 deciphered:

H = Hitachi

D = Deskstar

T = "two or three platter". Remember that 7K250 was "S" for standard, and this "two or three platter" rule applies to 400GB and 500GB variants only. Kurofune is "S" for standard as well.

72 = 7200rpm

25 = 250GB, the maximum capacity of a series (like T7K250).

25 = 250GB, the capacity of the drive.

D = generation code, Vancouver 4 (and if T7K500 means Vancouver 5, then Vancouver 5 is "D" as well). Whatever that "D" really means, I have no idea. (7K250 for example is "V" for Vancouver. V doesn't conflict with older Vancouver generations as older Vancouvers had totally different model numbers startin with DTLA or IC35L.)

L = "low profile" (note: they are all low profile. Drives like Samsung PL40 of DiamondMax 8 are ULTRA-low profile!).

A3 = Serial ATA 3Gbit/s. (Other combinations: AT = PATA and SA = Serial ATA 1.5Gbit/s.)

8 = 8MB cache. (Other possibile numbers: 2 = 2MB, 6 = 16MB.)

0 = a useless number (so far). Maybe they start using it if model numbers would otherwise collide.

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For those who wanted to know, if datasheet is correct (and by the past it was always the case), the 7K160 has a maximal transfert rate of 77.9 MBps and the T7K500 of 80.5 MBps...

(For the T7K250 Hitachi says 67.8 MBps).

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Where did you find that "80.5 MBps"? Which datasheet? It's not on the PDF and not on the HTML version either.

Datasheets (both) say: "Media transfer rate (max. Mbits/sec): 998" and that's 124,75 MB/s minus ECC, track-to-track seeks, etc. delays. Older drives have "Sustained data rate (MB/sec)" stated under "Performance" subsection, but not the T7K500. Where did you find those figures?

Of course it's simple to approximate the sustained transfer rate by making some calculations. For example, the media transfer rate for 7K400 is specified as 757 Mbit/s and for T7K500 it's 998 Mbit/s. In 7K400 datasheet, the maximum sustained transfer rate is 61.4 MB/s.

To make an approximation: 61.4 / 757 * 998 =80.95 MB/s. That's higher than 80.5 MB/s so I guess you didn't try to approximate it from other data given or at least not the same way I did?

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I takes figure for Media transfert rate (max. Mbits/sec) and for Sustained data rate (MB/sec) for 22GXP to T7K250, and do a regression analysis. The regression shows me that :

Sustained data rate = Media transfert rate * 0.0807 with a R² of 0,9985

Edited by Mei

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According to the press release, they won't be available until Q3 of this year.

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I'm wondering... are these drives perpendicular or not? Hitachi GST web site doesn't mention perpendicular recording in this new series of drives, but they do mention use of new IrMnCr heads (which were also introducted to 2.5" Travelstar 5K160 and which uses perpendicular recording).

http://www.hitachigst.com/tech/techlib.nsf...625716C006ACD22

Notice that "Associated Products: Travelstar 5K160". Where's the mention of T7K500? There's a link from T7K500 to that white paper, but no link back to T7K500.

The same applies to Thermal Fly-height Control white paper ( http://www.hitachigst.com/tech/techlib.nsf...6257171005E0F16 ).

Hitachi has previously mentioned that it will implement perpendicular recording first into 2.5" and 1.8" drives. Yet, the didn't announce 5K160 (the first Hitachi's perpendicular drive) until recently.

In one of the press releases: "Before product development began in earnest, perpendicular media showed lower mechanical reliability than longitudinal media. Perpendicular-media development required a rethinking of reliability metrics and anticipation of new potential failure mechanisms to help ensure the highest levels of corrosion resistance and mechanical robustness."

I'm just pondering, did HGST intend to release 2.5" and 1.8" earlier? Was there unexpected delays? If there were delays, then it might be possible that they managed to develop a 3.5" PMR drive before they managed to develop a 1.8 incher. But they don't admit that they've diverted from their original (very old) press release mentioning their goal to release small form-factor drives first.

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For those of you that is waiting for a review of the disk anandtech.com may come with some performance numbers pretty soon.

We will be having a 500GB roundup in the near future and will include the updated Hitachi Deskstar, Maxtor DiamondMax 11, Western Digital WD5000KS, and Seagate's own 7200.10 unit in our test results.

The quote was taken from anand`s 7200.10 review

http://www.anandtech.com/storage/showdoc.aspx?i=2760&p=5

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Guest 888

Now it becomes pretty clear that the upcoming Hitachi Deskstar 7K160 series one-platter drives are manufactured in Chinese factory which is also known by its own "Excelstor" HDD brand.

I just happened to dig out these datasheets from Excelstor's website:

http://www.excelstor.com/venus_160_files/sheet001.htm

http://www.excelstor.com/Jupiter_160_files/sheet001.htm

So, their new models are just exactly the same Hitachi Deskstar 7K160 drives 160GB and 80GB ;) Plus an additional 120GB version not listed by Hitachi.

Currently the same factory has manufactured also 7K80 and partially 7K250 (smaller capacities) for Hitachi. They have marketed these drives also by their own under the brands "Jupiter Callisto" and "Jupiter Ganymede" correspondingly...

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I wonder why everyone still considers IBM/Hitachi HD despite their bad reputation, which I have proven myself too many times.

I have 3 IBM GXP series which died in 12-15 months, 3 Hitachi notebook hd which died in 2 years. The last one is only 1 week ago.

Meanwhile, I'm still using my old Seagate 20GB 5400 rpm which I have used for 5 years, 20GB 7200RPM Quantum for 6 years, 40GB Seagate Cuda IV for 4 years, 120GB Seagate Cuda 4 for 3 years, another 120GB Cuda IV for 2 years, and a 10GB Maxtor for 8 years !!!.

Hitachi/IBM, for me personally, is the most crappy HD with severe reliabilty problem.

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I have had 5 IBM GXP drives die on me

At work I have had around 100 GXPs die on my team

This no doubt will be remembered in the HD Annals but

Hitachi have turned it around and produce solid fast reliable drives now

I use a HDT722525LDA280 as a system drive, 2 maxtor 300G for storage, and 4 200G barracuda/WDs for backup

The real question is when will prices drop to acceptable levels, i'd say $120 is acceptable :) making 300Gs most sorted

I wonder why everyone still considers IBM/Hitachi HD despite their bad reputation, which I have proven myself too many times.

I have 3 IBM GXP series which died in 12-15 months, 3 Hitachi notebook hd which died in 2 years. The last one is only 1 week ago.

Meanwhile, I'm still using my old Seagate 20GB 5400 rpm which I have used for 5 years, 20GB 7200RPM Quantum for 6 years, 40GB Seagate Cuda IV for 4 years, 120GB Seagate Cuda 4 for 3 years, another 120GB Cuda IV for 2 years, and a 10GB Maxtor for 8 years !!!.

Hitachi/IBM, for me personally, is the most crappy HD with severe reliabilty problem.

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