MaxBurn

Thecus N2100B NAS FTP HTTP etc

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Anyone have one? You like it? Little wary of a manufacturer I have never heard of before. Looking for a NAS device that has FTP and HTTP (web) server, ran across this:

mfg link:

http://www.thecus.com/products_over.php?cid=1&pid=1

newegg:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?...N82E16833201004

Also accepting suggestions on a simple NAS device with these qualifications:

NAS device Requirements:

-RAID 1 or 5 storage. With today's drives I can get my data on 400g drives in a mirror easily, probably the best cost solution for me.

-FTP; for remote access of files. Port must be changeable from 21 to whatever, and a couple user login levels like read only and full access.

-WEB; nothing special, static text and pictures, port must be changeable from 80 to whatever.

NAS device thing I would like but could live without:

-Free DNS updater ability would be nice, currently using DeeEnEs with DynDNS. I suppose I could get away with running this on my workstation though.

-Gigabit network port would be very nice, an honest 100 would not kill me but all my PC's have gigabit.

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Have you considered the Infrant ReadyNAS 600?

I recently purchased the extremely similar ReadyNAS X6, and am pleased with performance.

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No I hadn't looked at that yet, thanks for the suggestion.

Hmm

Infrant ReadyNAS X6 - no drives - $600 or so, This is rather pricey when you can get a computer for that much.

Infrant ReadyNAS 600-1000 - 4 250gb drives - $1200-1600 I don't get the differences in price on newegg.

Should I buy the ReadyNAS X6 or the 600?

Feature-wise and performance-wise, both devices are the same. The only difference lies in the RAID and Volume management. For the experienced RAID administrator, the 600 utilizes traditional RAID level 0,1 or 5 and is slightly more configurable, but requires an intimate understanding of RAID management in order to fully extract the benefits. In addition, the 600 does not facilitate automatic, single volume expansion. The X6 with X-RAID technology simplifies and automates the RAID management process, selecting the best configuration to balance protection and capacity. This enables both experienced and novice RAID users to quickly setup a multi-drive NAS. In addition, X-RAID allows users to easily and automatically scale from 1 to 4 disks as their needs grow.

Looks like the X6 would be fine for me as they both have the same features.

The Radiator management software looks great:

http://www.infrant.com/learn_features.htm

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Actually, they're about to release a new firmware which will allow the user to switch between the X6 and 600 functionality, as the hardware is identical.

It definitely is more expensive than putting together a Linux frankenserver, but it's also compact and a lot easier to maintain.

You may also want to look at the Buffalo TerraStation, although people pretty much universally complain about its performance.

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It definitely is more expensive than putting together a Linux frankenserver, but it's also compact and a lot easier to maintain.

Basically I am hoping for power savings beyond my full blown server (It probably eats power to the tune of $35 a month and heats a room by itself, intel 3.0C, 7 hard drives etc), simplicity of operation, and freeing me from keeping another computer current.

The initial cost of these is a pretty big put off at the moment, more than offsets any gains I will get by getting rid of this server. I noticed that the Infrant ReadyNAS have just the board available on their site but I don't see it being sold anywhere.

I hope these things come into their prime this year. Looking forward to lower prices in volume and more products. These things should be exploding with all the media people are getting into.

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I have an Infrant ReadyNAS X6, works great. I like the fact that I don't have to mess with the OS, more appliance-type. But, it has good features, GigE and jumbo frames and it's platform independent.

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I've been in your situation for quite a while too, but never found a decent solution. Either they are to slow or don't have the features I need or are much too expensive.

One main problem I have with most basic NAS units is that they usually accept 4 PATA, 4 SATA drives or something similar, if you want to add a fifth drive or even worse use a mix of PATA and SATA drives you are out of luck. With a computer the worst case requires another add on card, in most cases very cheap.

I'm running an old Celeron 800MHz, it doesn't use that much power, in your case with 7 drives it doesn't matter that much if the system uses 5 or 40 watts because your drives will be your main power consumer anyway. A decent new computer that doesn't use as much power as your 3GHz intel will not be that expensive, and nothing even comes close in flexibility.

The best thing about using a computer is that you can find one for free (or very cheap), or do like I do: When I need a new computer my fiancé gets the old one. Her old computer becomes the new server, and the old server is donated to some friend who happens to need a server or firewall or something.

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I noticed that the Infrant ReadyNAS have just the board available on their site but I don't see it being sold anywhere.

Actually, they're available on Amazon.com, although I got mine at eAegis.com

The fact of the matter is that you could fix your server so that it doesn't use as much power; but, at that point, you're half way to a NAS device, such as this. You also need to consider the value of the power saved; you could break even in two years or less.

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I noticed that the Infrant ReadyNAS have just the board available on their site but I don't see it being sold anywhere.

Actually, they're available on Amazon.com, although I got mine at eAegis.com I see nothing searching for IT71004 which is the part number of the board. Are you maybe referring to the whole unit? Would appreciate a link if you have it

The fact of the matter is that you could fix your server so that it doesn't use as much power; but, at that point, you're half way to a NAS device, such as this. You also need to consider the value of the power saved; you could break even in two years or less. These are my thoughts too, plus it's easy to use.

I wonder how much I would save with an AMD and Cool N Quiet and reducing my seven drives to 4? Two 400's for the storage in a mirror and two of whatever is left over for the OS. Of course this is a very vicious circle as I would be trading in my 3ware 7500-8 for something that does SATA because I don't feel like investing money in PATA at this late date. Lots of ideas flying around.

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As far as I know, you cannot buy a bare board unless you are an OEM. Seeing as the board is useless without a matching enclosure and power supply, I'm not sure what the point would be.

You could probably save a considerable amount of power with a processor that doesn't qualify as a space heater. Then again, something as pokey as a PII might do in a storage server.

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The Thecus N2100 is a great machine. I've had mine for several weeks, no problems at all. I can answer pretty much any questions you might have on it, I'm quite familiar with the box now. Some things to keep in mind:

1. Box is very small, much smaller than the pictures would lead you to believe. Put two hard drives on top of each other, and add an inch to each side. That's about how big it is. The mainboard sits below the hard drive cage and is really an eloquent design.

2. With small dimensions come heat and noise issues. Forced cooling by an excellent 40mm ADDA fan (thermally regulated) does not displace the fact that it is almost directly blowing unto a solid part of the hard drive cage (less than an inch away). Run quiet, cool drives for best performance. I'm running T7K250 250gbs in a RAID1 array which are neither quiet nor cool, but it's what I had available in my stockpile. No downtime or wierd behavior yet, rock-solid stable and fast.

3. "Home style" support team, when you can get a response out of them. Smaller company means longer wait times. You have to email them for firmware updates (they want to know what drives you are using) which is annoying but understandable.

4. Haven't run the gigabit link yet but it's a great selling point. Important to keep in mind that if the box craps out you won't be able to get your data off until you get a replacement. I hooked a drive up to my machine and it's running some wierd EXT3 variant but I couldn't get any bridge software to read it.

5. Wonderful GUI for setup and access. Loads quick and doesn't get in the way of what you want to do. I prefer a command prompt but this is about as good as it gets for graphical. Has a newbie feel to it but offers options that would have newbies' heads spinning. Poor manual. If you have any RAID/Linux/networking experience it should be a joy to use.

6. iTunes server is an awesome feature. Files must be in the iTunes folder on the box though (can't be on USB connected drives). This is a VERY annoying limitation. File access is fast and reliable though.

Overall, an awesome piece of equipment for the price. Very satisfied with the purchase.

-Evan-

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Won't let me edit my post, so here's the other points I wished to make.

3. "Home style" support team, when you can get a response out of them. Smaller company means longer wait times but you connect with people that really know the product (hell, they probably had a hand in designing it). You have to email them for firmware updates (they want to know what drives you are using) which is annoying but understandable.

4. Haven't run the gigabit link yet but it's a great selling point for future use. Important to keep in mind that if the box craps out you won't be able to get your data off until you get a replacement. I hooked a drive up to my machine and it's running some wierd EXT3 RAID variant but I couldn't get any bridge software to read it.

-Evan-

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Personally, i would build my own server.

If you start with a VIA C3 mobo, 600 or 800 mhz, and a quiet PSU like an Antec 350 you can build yourself a small, quiet, cheap Linux server that can do all you asked.

And way cheaper and more quiet than most or all NAS boxes there are.

Maybe have a look here to get an idea.

You would be way better off imho if you can build it - but you may have other priorities than i do.

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The OpenBrick looks good, and I considered it. But it's more expensive (plus you have to add memory unless you have a SDRAM stick laying around) and doesn't have a gigabit ethernet interface. Not sure it does hardware RAID either because I think it only has space for a single hard drive. Obviously, a box running Linux (like a self-built C3) can do more than the N2100 but strictly as a fast and stable file server I think it's hard to beat.

Evan

Edited by Quaiboy

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Tom's networking just reviewed the Infrant NV, it's like their earlier products, but has hotswap like the Thecus. http://www.tomsnetworking.com/2006/03/03/i...nt_readynas_nv/

The good: It's faster than the Thecus.

Only drawbacks: They say it's a little on the loud side, and something about not being able to transmit jumbo frames (only receive) but I think that's a fixable firmware issue.

It would be nice if it used an external brick power supply like the super quiet box that Shuttle has out.

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