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bobdavisnpf

Quiet RAID: 3x 44dB or 5x 38dB disks?

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Hi all,

I'm looking at the Samsung Spinpoint 250GB vs the Seagate 7200.9 500GB disks for a 1TB RAID set. Which do you think would be quieter: 3 of the Seagates at 44dB each, or 5 of the Samsungs at 38dB each?

Cheers,

Bob

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Hi all,

I'm looking at the Samsung Spinpoint 250GB vs the Seagate 7200.9 500GB disks for a 1TB RAID set. Which do you think would be quieter: 3 of the Seagates at 44dB each, or 5 of the Samsungs at 38dB each?

Cheers,

Bob

Don't go by the manufacturer specifications. They're inaccurate. I suggest you check out these pages:

http://www.silentpcreview.com/article283-page1.html - Seagate 7200.9 500GB drive

http://www.silentpcreview.com/article258-page1.html - Samsung P120 200GB drive

SPCR hasn't done a review on the 250GB Samsung P120, but if the platter counts are the same, the noise characteristics should be nearly identical.

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By the way, due to the logarithmic nature of sound measurements, for three drives, you'll want to add 4.5 decibels to the idle noise of one drive, and for five drives, you'll want to add 6.75 decibels to the idle noise of one drive.

Also, if you don't mind me asking? Why are you considering odd numbers of drives? RAID 5 isn't really what its cracked up to be reliability or performance wise. You might want to consider mirroring two pairs of drives and then stripping the pairs, so that way, if one drive goes, there is a 2/3 chance that if a second drive goes you won't have any down time.

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By the way, due to the logarithmic nature of sound measurements, for three drives, you'll want to add 4.5 decibels to the idle noise of one drive, and for five drives, you'll want to add 6.75 decibels to the idle noise of one drive.

Also, if you don't mind me asking? Why are you considering odd numbers of drives? RAID 5 isn't really what its cracked up to be reliability or performance wise. You might want to consider mirroring two pairs of drives and then stripping the pairs, so that way, if one drive goes, there is a 2/3 chance that if a second drive goes you won't have any down time.

Shining,

Thanks for the link! I'd forgotten about that site. Also for the info re: how to figure the added noise level for the number of drives.

The spcr review's description of Seagate's high-pitch whine is a good alert for me. The 1500-2000Hz range is one that constantly sticks out to me, and the Seagate whine would bug me to no end. My 120-200Hz range perception is much less annoying for me.

The odd number of drives is mainly just to get the most rudimentary protection level. I don't need the performance or continuous protection of RAID1 but I'm not quite rash enough to go for a straight RAID0 setup. I rely mainly on offsite tape backups for data protection, supplemented by CDROMs and offsite "cold" hard disks.

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