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sprockkets

See the 75GXP click of death

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http://home.mpinet.net/joesoid/75gxp.mpg

2.5 MB. Got it somewhat cheap off ebay.

After watching it do this I'm not sure it's the mechanics of the drive that fail, but the electronic controls. What is also weird is that it did made funny noises when my Promise ATA/100 controller on my Asus A7V tried to detect it. Might give some truth to the controller issue, but is not an excuse for failure.

Feedback and ideas welcome.

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Hate the way you can't edit posts. Anyway, just a thought, when I got my 75GXP back from repair, it failed when I did a xfer from one partition to another, in the gigabytes. I couldn't stop it cause if you do then it erases the file in transfer (used the cut function). During the xfer though, the computer spontaneously reseted, and the hd failed, only a couple of months after repair. The drive was very hot as well.

OK, the drive did boot up when it cooled down, then I backed up everything, but after restarting the computer after that, the drive never came back. Just the same noise you hear in my video.

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http://home.mpinet.net/joesoid/75gxp.mpg

2.5 MB. Got it somewhat cheap off ebay.

After watching it do this I'm not sure it's the mechanics of the drive that fail, but the electronic controls. What is also weird is that it did made funny noises when my Promise ATA/100 controller on my Asus A7V tried to detect it. Might give some truth to the controller issue, but is not an excuse for failure.

Feedback and ideas welcome.

Hmmm. Just downloaded it and watched it. Initially, I thought something was rubbing the actuator/VCM, hence it wasn't able to unload off the ramp and that odd hissing/rubbing noise. But then it swept across the disk without any problems, although it then immediately parked again.

It's not a problem of not having enough current available to spin-up, as the heads can obviously unload and the disks are spinning. It probably spun down because there is a timer for how much time/retries the drive allows for the heads to find themselves on the disk before it automatically spins down.

My guess is there is a firmware bug preventing the heads from unloading soon enough. I've seen a drive do something similar once due to a firmware bug. It can be something such as misplaced/mistimed heroic recovery, possibly triggered by something else, such as reaching a preset number of errors or retries. *shrugs* At least, that's my speculation.

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Well let me clarify. It turned off cause I turned the computer off.

However, when I tried to take out the power connector and quickly put it back in, it wouldn't start up again, which is good in a way.

Actually before I took it apart to test it, it actually did come up just fine. But as soon as the Promise BIOS came up to try to detect what was on the cable, it started the noises.

I've just always wondered why it made such a high pitched noise since my ex 75GXP did it. The heads move freely back and forth manually.

When I first took the cover off that platter was sooo shiny clean. It also makes quite a lot of air turbulance for one platter.

Anyway, enjoy the clip, for all those who might wonder what is going on when that high pitched noise occurs.

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I've just always wondered why it made such a high pitched noise since my ex 75GXP did it. The heads move freely back and forth manually.

A few causes of the high-pitched noises would include: rubbing, head crash in progress, or resonance in the mechanical system. I'm thinking the latter makes the most sense, since it almost sounds like a pure tone in the frequency range of a suspension mode. I had a failed drive at work once that would excite a resonance remarkably similar to fingernails on the chalkboard when seeking to a specific cylinder. 8O Ow, that hurt my ears! The other possibility is it could be a motor pure tone.

The turbulence is due to the high speed of the disks spinning. If you look carefully on the disk surfaces of failed drives (a magnifying glass helps) you can sometimes spot headslaps on the media, a good indication of shipping/handling damage. To the naked idea it often looks like tiny shiny specks on the platter, although since it's glass media it will look like tiny cracks under a microscope. 50X is enough to see a lot, if you are so inclined. ;)

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