Tiger_Flash

LCD TV or LCD monitor?

18 posts in this topic

So I've noticed the biggest commercial LCD monitor for a computer one can buy is 24" and it supports 1920x1080 res. However, the biggest LCD TV I've found that supports this res is along the line of 37"! Here's one if you'd like to check it out. http://www.sceptre.com/Products/LCD/Specif..._X37SV-Naga.htm Other than the cost of each, can anyone tell me any other reason for why one should go for the monitor over the TV? I was told the only difference other than the screen size is one carries a TV tuner. If this is true, why won't anyone make larger monitors? Is it just too impractical to be browsing your desktop on a 37" screen? If it is.......I beg to differ! Lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go with the monitor. The TV will not support as high of resolutions and the dot pitch will be higher making the picture quality poor and hard to read.

Looking for a nice big monitor, the apple cinema display woll work on any pc and is huge at 30" plus its image is very good and high quality.

Link:

http://www.apple.com/displays/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tiger,

There is something called a minimum viewing distance - the distance at which you can actually see pixellation of the image, AND the distance at which the display requires you to move your head excessively to see the entire desktop. For example, imagine if you had a wall-sized display that was 3 fee in front of you - at a normal resolution the pixels would be the size of golf balls, and your neck would soon tire from having to swivel your head left, right, up and down constantly. That's obviously an extreme example - but it illustrates the point. For home theater use, the recommended viewing angle is something like 50-60 degrees of your field of view - which is obviously dependant upon the distance and size (think back to trig).

There ARE good LCD TVs that are basically high-quality monitors with included TV tuners - I've been in a doctor's office (plastic surgeon) where he had a huge LCD TV hooked up to his computer as a display (mostly for showing off samples of his work). I think it was one of the giant Gateway LCD TVs. But you do need to be careful on resolutions, and probably accept the fact that at a given price point the monitor will have a higher resolution and screen quality. Perhaps your best bet is a high quality monitor of the size you would like, and add a TV tuner card to your display...

Future Shock

PS - and for udaman - I was in the doc's office for professional reasons - one of his clients wanted me to build a website, and he was serving as her advisor...and boyfriend. Long story, better suited for B&G...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 47" tv that the s video out from my 5900 ultra goes to. Playing games might be ok but trying to read something like these forums would be near impossible and at the least would cause a severe headache.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to have a monitor the size of a drawing board. It would be ok if things that are not in the center aren't razor sharp. That way I could push things off to the sides that I'm not currently working on, but I'd still be able to see/find things that I want to pull into the center.

I think it would be hard to build a monitor with very fine pixels in the 32"x18" center, and grosser pixels in the rest of the monitor.

As is I have a three-monitor setup with the middle monitor being the one where I normally work, with Outlook, Quicken, documentation, tunes, forums, etc on the wings. It's still not normally as large as a draft board.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Go with the monitor.  The TV will not support as high of resolutions and the dot pitch will be higher making the picture quality poor and hard to read.

Looking for a nice big monitor, the apple cinema display woll work on any pc and is huge at 30" plus its image is very good and high quality.

Link:

http://www.apple.com/displays/

207298[/snapback]

Then try dual 30" cinema displays for large working area, do not get a tv to use for a monitor, you will be very disappointed with the quality, it will impossible to read, and you will be out the money for the tv only to have to go out and buy real monitors anyway. BTW the tv you would buy will say "the dvi input is not intended for use with personal computers" going against this warning will cut the life of the tv short and void your warrenty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woah that 30" monitor looks really sexy! And it goes up to 2560x1600 res! Would there be any compatibility issues sticking an apple monitor on a non-apple pc? Also, is Apple really the only company that makes monitors this big? I seriously couldn't find anything bigger than 24" till I saw this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The apple displays work fine on a regular pc, and I think these may be the biggest avaliable but I'm not 100% on that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dell and Apple use the same LGPhilips screen in the 20in size, just the Dell uses a different backlight (which there are reported problems with, but Dell's warrant is much longer than Apple's meager 1yr warranty).

At any rate, IIRC currently on the PC size you'll need a graphics card that supports dual-link DVI connections, and that will set you back $1000. You can get either a GForce or X800 on Apple's G5 that will drive these 30in, higher 2.3kx1.6k? resolution monitors, at $500-600. It's not inexpensive, what with 2 30in ACD's at $2800 ea. Hehe, but Apple's PB 15in & 17in with 128MB VRAM Radeon Mobility GPU's will drive one of these dual-link DVI monitors, for the ultimate in road-warrior machines.

30.jpg

FS--- getting ahead of the game here ;) ? TMI, we all know plastic surgeons don't do repairs for the 'broken penis syndrome'. Besides, you're confusing your threads, that link goes into the SC's B&G 'gigolo' thread... upcoming ;)

Whether it be built in as TV, or separate TV tuner; they are not all created equally. Hook up a poor quality tuner to a high-resolution monitor and you'll still get a lousy image for number or reasons and/or uses. If you want to spend $$$$, you can get both small and large HDTV screens that the Pros use in HD video capture, which are NTSC calibrated for accuracy and NTSC specs (Europe and Asia have different specs).

Hmm, can I get that 82in Samsumg panel to rotate into 'portrait' mode, Jessica Alba in hi-def, bigger than real life...woohoo!

Sharp's 1980x1080 (current highest resolution for broadcast HDTV, but there will come a day when ultra-def will replace that, maybe in digital theaters at 1st, but 10-20yrs from now 4k-16k resolutions would be possible.--- http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle....AN-SHARP-DC.XML

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The apple displays work fine on a regular pc, and I think these may be the biggest avaliable but I'm not 100% on that.

207347[/snapback]

Not exactly. <_<

You need a dual-link video card, which are rather rare, and very expensive.

EDIT: udaman also pointed this out above. Sorry for the redundant post.

Edited by Gilbo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Woah that 30" monitor looks really sexy!  And it goes up to 2560x1600 res!  Would there be any compatibility issues sticking an apple monitor on a non-apple pc?  Also, is Apple really the only company that makes monitors this big?  I seriously couldn't find anything bigger than 24" till I saw this.

207345[/snapback]

Well, the only issue with running the 30" Apple Cinema Display in all its wondrous glory on a PC is finding a decent graphics card with dual-link DVI (not to be confused with just dual DVI) to run it.

There are several cards capable of running this beast at its native 2560 x 1600 resolution. I'll see about posting a short list of the more readily available ones later today.

Dual Link

Dual Link DVI supports 2x165 MHz (2048x1536 at 60 Hz, 1920x1080 at 85 Hz). A dual link implementation utilizes all 24 of the available pins.

Single Link

Single Link DVI supports a maximum bandwidth of 165 MHz (1920x1080 at 60 Hz, 1280x1024 at 85Hz). A single link implementation utilizes 12 of the 24 available pins.

With reduced blanking, it is possible to run at 2560 x 1600 @ 60 Hz.

I've been waiting around for awhile, hoping that ATi would come through with a new high-end All-in-Wonder utilizing the Theater Pro 550 chip, one or two dual-link DVI or HDMI out, and the other usual goodies that come with an All-in-Wonder, especially considering that the Mac version of the Radeon X800XT will run a 30" Apple Cinema Display.

I'll follow up with more info later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...

With reduced blanking, it is possible to run at 2560 x 1600 @ 60 Hz.

I've been waiting around for awhile, hoping that ATi would come through with a new high-end All-in-Wonder utilizing the Theater Pro 550 chip, one or two dual-link DVI or HDMI out, and the other usual goodies that come with an All-in-Wonder, especially considering that the Mac version of the Radeon X800XT will run a 30" Apple Cinema Display.

I'll follow up with more info later.

207356[/snapback]

How much later?

I am looking at the PNY Quadrp FX4000 AGP or the FX4400 PCIe

I have seen a setup with the fx4000 and two displays but PNY will not tell me if the fx4400 will also support TWO 30" at 2560 x 1600 (2560 x 3200) total.

http://www.synapps.de/synapps/bin/view/Mai...aDisplayWindows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a 47" tv that the s video out from my 5900 ultra goes to.  Playing games might be ok but trying to read something like these forums would be near impossible and at the least would cause a severe headache.

I've sometimes noticed that same effect on just about every monitor I've ever tried storagereview.com with...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's probably because of the very limited signalling capability of S-Video. I don't think it can do much more than 800x600 if at all that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's probably because of the very limited signalling capability of S-Video. I don't think it can do much more than 800x600 if at all that.

208632[/snapback]

S-Video, like composite, is limited to 640x480 interlaced.

Most TV's aren't 1920 x 1080. They may accept that resolution, but then they down convert it digitially to match the panel size (or it happens analog with CRT based displays).

Sharp's LC-45GX6U (Aquos) is a true 1920x1080 LCD TV (45").

I'm waiting for prices to come down on the 1920x1080 LCoS front projectors. Why stop at 60" when you can have 160".

Edited by rabident

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I was hoping to put together a list of suitable cards that would drive the 30" Apple Cinema Display sooner, since I have done quite a bit of research on it and would like to share my findings. Sorry for the delay, but other things kept coming up.

After looking into it, there are several cards available which will drive the Apple 30" display on a PC. The list includes, but isn't necessarily limited to, the following:

Maxtor DL256 Parhelia (PCI/PCI-X, 64 bit, 66 MHz)

ASUS V9999GE (AGP 8x/4x)

ATi FireGL V5000 (PCI Express)

ATi FireGL V7100 (PCI Express)

ATi FireGL X3-256 (AGP 8x/4x)

QuadroFX 4000 SDI (AGP 8x)

QuadroFX 3000G (AGP 8x)

QuadroFX 3000 (AGP 8x)

QuadroFX 3400 (PCI Express)

The following cards can drive two (2) 30" Apple Cinema Displays:

QuadroFX 4000 (AGP 8x)

QuadroFX 4400 (PCI Express)

QuadroFX 4400G (PCI Express)

Please see geek.com for a lengthy thread with good information on running the Apple 30" Cinema Display on a PC.

If you are willing to compromise slightly on size, Dell has a 24" LCD that can be run with an ATi AIW X800XT, which seems to be the only viable path to attain my personal goals of wanting to have a graphics card with the ability to do quite a bit with video as well as have great gaming performance.

If you only care about gaming performance or don't want to spend as much, then the V9999GE might be your best bet.

On a related note, though, it does appear that quite a few manufacturers are getting ready to release monitors/HDTVs with 1920 x 1080 resolution and at least one DVI or HDMI input, so hopefully we'll see some of those hittings the shelves in another month or two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dell has a compatibility list for the 2405FPW, and most current gen graphics cards are on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It also looks like the new nVidia 7800 may sport at least one dual-link DVI connector, so for people only interested in gaming and not recording/watching video, the 7800 will provide the top gaming performance.

However, before purchasing any video card, please read the card specs to find whether a DVI output is dual or single link.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now