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tempus

Defective drives Who is the worst?

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Like they would ever tell us!

Like we would ever forgive them.

I'm reasonably certain that employees of Maxtor, Seagate and Western Digital, if not IBM or Samsung, will read this though.

And I bet they're all dying to know what it is for the other guys, too.

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I believe the most qualified persons to make statements on the *current* reliability of different manufacturers, must be the large distributors.

I'm certain any new drive can be a lemon. The most reliable manufacturer today can unintentially throw a POS drive on the market tomorrow. On average, I buy one drive a year. As a consequence, my opinion is irrelevant. I can only say that my 1 gigabyte Seagate Medalist 31220A from 1995 has experienced a fair amount of abuse and it still has zero bad sectors. What does this mean? NOTHING, absolutely nothing. If you work at a retail store, you might have an idea on the subject, but your view on the matter will span too large a timeframe, like "We haven't had THAT much Maxtor RMA's the last two years...". But unfortunately, you can't judge the latest generation of drives...

Unless you work at a large distributor or a really big computer shop with a huge turnover, you just don't know.

I wished that the drive reliability survey would come back. It was a really great initiative.

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Depends on the family and model at the given time. It frequently changes from generation to generation, year to year.

Currently, many IBM Has received a lot of press about the reliability of their drives attributable to (a) the GXP reliability, (B) customer service/RMA procedures, and © the lastest recommendation of power on hours. Before the the 75GXP fiasco, IBM was considered by many the most reliable manufacture of HDDs.

Western Digital had their major recall a few years ago, and many at that time wondered if WD would recover--they obviously did considering the stunning performance and seemingly few complaints of their current line of HDDs.

Maxtor is also a noteworthy case. The IDE manufacture of value-priced HDDs did not have a reputation for reliability--consumer confidence seemed to be split on them, but in hindsight I wonder if it's because of their value-pricing and exclusive IDE line at the time. Maxtor surprisingly receives few complaints given it's enormous market share. On the SR reliability survey, it scored well if memory serves (which surprised me at the time).

When you look at a hdd for what it is, it's amazing they are as reliable as they are. They are rapdily approaching the molecular level in density, and this crude device of spinning platters, moving arms, and seeking heads is able to read/write data with no errors for over a terrabyte of data.

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IBM

Fujitsu

Seagate

Western Digital

Maxtor

Samsung

In that order.

That chart can only be true for the ATA world. For SCSI, Seagate has one heck of a reputation regarding the reliability of their drives. Of course, there's only four major players in the SCSI market...(I don't consider Hitachi to be a major one).

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Like they would ever tell us!

Like we would ever forgive them.

I'm reasonably certain that employees of Maxtor, Seagate and Western Digital, if not IBM or Samsung, will read this though. 

And I bet they're all dying to know what it is for the other guys, too.

We do read it, and actually, we have a fairly good idea how the other guys perform. There are industry publications that research such things (for beaucoup bucks, I might add), and the information is only divulged to the very high up folks in the company. (In other words, I don't know any more than you do, but I'm sure my CEO knows ;) ) And the charts published usually do not explicitly mention company names, only "insert your firm here" vs. Competitor A, Competitor B, etc., etc. Most people can guess who is who in these charts, especially when it's coupled with volumes produced and specs.

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