Ron_Jeremy

combining 2 broadband connections

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I've been looking at the Xincom/Nexland/etc boxes that are available. However, firstly they are pricey & secondly I don't know if they fit the situation. Basically, 2 cable connections into the same house. Now, I don't really care for redundancy. What I'm interested in is combining the upload capabilities of both cable connections. Is there a Linux distro (similar to Smoothwall, etc) that would allow me to do this? So if we had 2 x 2Mb-down/1Mb-up connections into the house, we'd end up with ~2mb-up line. I'd like to build a larger capacity game server & splitting 2 Shaw cable connections amongst a few peeps is fairly cheap.

Also, is anyone using the Shawcable Docsis service here in Canada? If so, how do you like it?

Edited by Ron_Jeremy

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I don't know if it would be possible to combine two internet connections into a single one because each must have its own IP address, and each IP would be associated with its own unique connection.

Something like this was done in the past by combining the bandwidth of two analog modems, but this required ISP support, with the ISP's router translating the two internal connections to a single external connection.

You could do the next best thing and load-balance your connections. This wouldn't, for example, make your uplink to an online game account any faster (unless you were maintaining more than one connection), but it could spread the bandwidth requirements of multiple independent connections across your two accounts.

This looks like a good place to start.

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> What I'm interested in is combining the upload capabilities of

> both cable connections.

As the previous poster said, each cable modem connection will have it's own IP address and the upload capacity of each would be seperate. Unless whoever you're communicating with has support for both your connections as well then you may be able to rig something up with multilink-ppp or similar tech.

The benefit you'd get is that your game server could be listening on both IPs. So it's more of a manual load balancing... where if a person was getting poor pings on one IP they could reconnect to the other (but still be part of the same game).

You could also balance any downloads you're doing... where each IP you're trying to get to over the Internet would take a different connection. So a single web page or download wouldn't benefit... but several downloads or different web pages would. The more people in your house you're sharing the 2 connections with the better it would work. It also works well for P2P apps (i.e. BitTorrent) as your client will be trying to download from several different places automatically.

I replied to a similar topic here:

http://forums.2cpu.com/showthread.php?threadid=63961

Regards,

Rox

Edited by Roxor McOwnage

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I think doing this could be possible if your provider is willing to tie the connections together on their end.

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This is possible all ready, there are $200 Routers that do this for you. I beleave a Windows 2003 can even do this under the Routing Admin tab.

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Just a note: no dual-wan router, hardware or software, or any magic you perform with Linux will by themselves do what Ron_Jeremy is asking... which is to combine the upload capacity of both cable modems. At best they all make it easy to manage and load-balance both connections and handle failures of either connection automatically.

You need support on the other end, which as xSTLx points out would be best if your ISP does it for you. You see that type of thing most often with ISDN and dial-up lines from some providers. Google for "multilink PPP" (MLPPP).

Regards,

Rox

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I have seen this done with IDSL and a netopia R9100, of course it was the same provider on the remote end. I am not sure if it was easier becuase of the ATM relationship DSL has or if alot of work was needed at the head.

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The other potential issue is that cable modems are 10Down/2UP max per node, which depends on how many houses your particular cable co puts on a single node. In other words, unless the cable modems are artificially capped in some way, adding a second my only half the throughoutput of each, resulting in no net gain.

-Chris

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Just a note: no dual-wan router, hardware or software, or any magic you perform with Linux will by themselves do what Ron_Jeremy is asking... which is to combine the upload capacity of both cable modems.
Yes, this was confirmed over the last couple days buy hardware vendors selling "dual WAN" boxes. This sucks. I think maybe the ISPs are losing out here. IF it were possible they'd be receiving money for 2 accounts from our house. Now, only 1. Too bad, so sad..... Edited by Ron_Jeremy

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Just a note: no dual-wan router, hardware or software, or any magic you perform with Linux will by themselves do what Ron_Jeremy is asking... which is to combine the upload capacity of both cable modems.
Yes, this was confirmed over the last couple days buy hardware vendors selling "dual WAN" boxes. This sucks. I think maybe the ISPs are losing out here. IF it were possible they'd be receiving money for 2 accounts from our house. Now, only 1. Too bad, so sad.....

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You have to look at it from the ISPs side: they don't want that kind of customer. ISPs survive by overselling their bandwidth. Anyone requiring multiple connections is probably already maxing out one line, which is a losing proposition for the ISP. So, if they supported bonding two connections, they'd just end up losing money on two accounts instead of one.

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