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pinnocchio

Areca 1260 Native PCI-E or Bridged?

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The essential difference between the PCI-X and PCI Express SATA RAID adapters from Areca is in I/O processor. The PCIe cards are using an Intel IOP332, which is equipped with an external PCI Express interface, while the PCI-X cards are using an IOP331 processor, which has an externel PCI-X interface. So yes, the ARC-1260 is native PCIe.

Intel IOP specs

Edited by FemmeT

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Why is everyone so obsessed with native vs bridges?

200192[/snapback]

Performance.

What is the use of a high performance bus if you are limited by the intermediate bus. People want the higher bandwidth of PCI-E over PCI and bridging PCI-E to 32/33 PCI will have lower performance than a base 32/33 PCI.

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Performance.

I can't think of anything non-snarky to say right now. Back it up with some kind of documentation. The card's internal circuitry doesn't have anything to do with the bus it's attached to.

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Performance.

I can't think of anything non-snarky to say right now. Back it up with some kind of documentation. The card's internal circuitry doesn't have anything to do with the bus it's attached to.

200217[/snapback]

No, but it's interface with the rest of the machine does. This is I/O we're talking about...

You could have a chip capable of shifting 2 GB/sec, and if you attach it to standard PCI it'll still have to go at >133MB/sec. Bridging also adds more overhead, possibly increasing latencies and thus reducing peak bandwidth.

Dave

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So what you're asking is whether the card sucks or not. Bridging has nothing to do with it. There are a dozen different ways that bridge chips could be used without impacting performance. I assume you read the 9-card RAID review that was published a little bit ago? The one where the Areca cards dominated?

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I have no experience of either of the exotic PCI types, but I remember back to the days when ISA started to be bridged through PCI.

FAST-SCSI ISA cards dropped hugely in performance when plugged into these boards - less than 2MB/s in a bus which was capable of 8-12MB/s (depending how it was clocked).

I have no idea how comparable this is to the various PCI's, but it does go to show that sometimes bridging can be disastrous.

cheers, Martin

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I have no idea how comparable this is to the various PCI's, but it does go to show that sometimes bridging can be disastrous.

200233[/snapback]

It definately can be - just as any other aspect of card design can be if done poorly. However my point is that bridging - in and of itself - does not say anything significant about the quality of the component.

Never gotten my hands on an Areca (seeing as they're rather costly) but from what I've seen they aren't victims of poor design.

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I have no idea how comparable this is to the various PCI's, but it does go to show that sometimes bridging can be disastrous.

200233[/snapback]

It definately can be - just as any other aspect of card design can be if done poorly. However my point is that bridging - in and of itself - does not say anything significant about the quality of the component.

Never gotten my hands on an Areca (seeing as they're rather costly) but from what I've seen they aren't victims of poor design.

200248[/snapback]

I too have heard lots of good things about the Areca raid cards. I have yet to see one for sale... but there are several good reviews of them around...

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I too have heard lots of good things about the Areca raid cards. I have yet to see one for sale... but there are several good reviews of them around...

200249[/snapback]

They're pretty high-end parts, and have a price tag to match. Because of this you're unlikely to find them most places and will have to hunt a bit.

Alternatively, send them an email sales@areca.us and I'm sure they'd be glad to help.

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Who cares if it's bridged? Take a look at your system chipset, it is full of PCI/AGP/FSB/hub bridges.

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I know this is an old thread, but I just had to correct the wrongness here. Post #3 is wrong: the Areca cards are not "native" PCI-Express. The other posts are correct: it doesn't matter.

The Intel CPU used on the Areca controller has a PCI-Express bridge with two PCI-X busses. The controller itself is on one PCI-X bus, and the other is unused. The performance impact of the signalling bridge is indistinguishable from zero. If you though it was a problem, you'd probably be really upset about the HyperTransport-to-PCI-Express bridge, right?

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The Intel CPU used on the Areca controller has a PCI-Express bridge with two PCI-X busses.  The controller itself is on one PCI-X bus, and the other is unused.  The performance impact of the signalling bridge is indistinguishable from zero.  If you though it was a problem, you'd probably be really upset about the HyperTransport-to-PCI-Express bridge, right?

212652[/snapback]

Not to mention that the Raptor you are likely to plug into the Areca is bridged also.

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