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StorageHobo

Ok this is doin my head in. 80pin/40pin? wtf

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I really need this cleared up. Im going insane.

I been to a number of tech? forums. Visited sites like cdrinfo (which I really like, dont get me wrong).

Googled, even thats stressing.

I was normal b4 :blink: but now, Im starting to question my existence>

I dont get it!!!!

Is there such a thing as 80 pin ide cable????????

I always believed there was only such a thing as 40pin40wire and 40pin80wire cable. But NEVER 80 pin?????

I even corrected a number of ppl on other forums over this, but it looks like a pandemic. Sometimes it seems that Im the only person one this planet who thinks theres no such thing as 80pin ide cable. Even cdrinfo, my trusted site calls dvd/ide cable 80pin even on their latest reviews. And when I troll back its there all over the place.

I feel like the last man standing in invasion of the body snatchers. Its like aliens have invaded our tech communties and pertutrated this 'fact'. Hell even Im believing in it.

That is until I come to my home, my storagereview. If any1 can save me its u guys. Please tell me Im not going insane.

*lays down in foetal position and sucks thumb*

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If you are referring to the standard PATA or normal IDE interface, they are only 40-pins. The only difference is the cable used for each ATA standard.

Normal PIO and ATA33 uses only the normal "40-wire" cable. This can be found mostly used for CD and DVD drives.

ATA66, ATA100 and ATA133 requires the "80-wire" cable. This is usually used for HDDs.

Btw, you can use the 80-wire cable for CD and DVD drives also, makes no difference anyway since most of these drives use ATA33 standard only.

:rolleyes:

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Lex is right and so are you. There has never been any "80-pin" IDE devices. 40 pins and 40 or 80 wires, that's all you get.

Michael

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::evil grin:: what about the missing pin? I thought IDE cables were only 39 pin :-D

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At the top of the SR article it also states that it was:

Reprinted, with permission, from

The PC Guide

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I really need this cleared up. Im going insane.

I been to a number of tech? forums. Visited sites like cdrinfo (which I really like, dont get me wrong).

Googled, even thats stressing.

I was normal b4  :blink:  but now, Im starting to question my existence>

I dont get it!!!!

Is there such a thing as 80 pin ide cable????????

I always believed there was only such a thing as 40pin40wire and 40pin80wire cable. But NEVER 80 pin?????

I even corrected a number of ppl on other forums over this, but it looks like a pandemic. Sometimes it seems that Im the only person one this planet who thinks theres no such thing as 80pin ide cable. Even cdrinfo, my trusted site calls dvd/ide cable 80pin  even on their latest reviews. And when I troll back its there all over the place.

I feel like the last man standing in invasion of the body snatchers. Its like aliens have invaded our tech communties and pertutrated this 'fact'. Hell even Im believing in it.

That is until I come to my home, my storagereview. If any1 can save me its u guys. Please tell me Im not going insane.

*lays down in foetal position and sucks thumb*

199476[/snapback]

As already mentioned, there is no such thing as an 80-pin IDE cable, just an 80-wire.

But I, like you, run across WAY too many people who don't know the difference. Maybe I'm just pedantic, but these kind of things kill me. I also can't stand it when people call DVD-R discs "DVD minus R".

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As already mentioned, there is no such thing as an 80-pin IDE cable, just an 80-wire.

But I, like you, run across WAY too many people who don't know the difference.  Maybe I'm just pedantic, but these kind of things kill me.  I also can't stand it when people call DVD-R discs "DVD minus R".

199532[/snapback]

Then what do you call DVD+/-R? 'Plus and dash'? :P

Speaking of mis-statements: ATM Machine? PIN Number? Microsoft Works? Army Intelligence? :D (I kid because... I was in the Air Force.)

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SO here is the real deal, the 80 pin actually refers to this:

there are 40 wires (1 not used = 39 i guess). But around each of these wires is another wire that is grounded. The same way the cat 5e wires work. Another wire (grounded) wraps the communicating wire to prevent cross-talk or stray capacitance!!!...

SCSA

I prefer to use rounded cables with foil. Or even better, get SATA cables.

SCSA

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Cheers guys. U really cleared this up for me. I can sleep better now.

U really dont what this means. I seen pros, ppl I really respect call them 80pin and just sometimes I had the feeling that the tech world produced something I was totally unawares of. I felt like I spent the last 10 years living in a cave. Totally out of my depth. :unsure:

Thanks a plenty. :blush:

PS I'll try and figure out why its 39pin rather than 40pin. Although it doesnt bother me as much as the 80pin fiasco.

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Ah this gets interesting.

I found out what the 39-40pins are for.

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/ide3.htm

I havent yet found out what that extra 40th wire that doesnt have a pin do, or if its there. Why would any1 include a 40th wire that doesnt do anything? Surely that would add to costs?

Also it becomes more confusing because some of the pins are ground, that means the connecting wires are ground. So why would an 80wire cable have a pair (an extra wire for ground); to reduce crosstalk?

Might have to find a white paper or something.

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Actually, I and quite a lot of other people I know know that the - in DVD-R stands for dash but still call them minus. But DVD minus R is easier to say DVD dash R. Calling them DVD Rs is just confusing. Also, it helps set them apart from DVD+R much easy. I think the + guys were quite smart since by doing what they did, not only did they get the people who don't know on their side, most of the people who do know still call it that probably for the reasons I mentioned except for a few who are either pedantic or DVD-R fanatics :-P

Edited by Nil Einne

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Ah this gets interesting.

I found out what the 39-40pins are for.

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/ide3.htm

I havent yet found out what that extra 40th wire that doesnt have a pin do, or if its there. Why would any1 include a 40th wire that doesnt do anything? Surely that would add to costs?

Also it becomes more confusing because some of the pins are ground, that means the connecting wires are ground. So why would an 80wire cable have a pair (an extra wire for ground); to reduce crosstalk?

Might have to find a white paper or something.

199590[/snapback]

I'm not sure but I don't think it does anything. Whether it's required by a standard I don't know. But remember that the way flat cables are designed, not including the wire would in fact probably end up costing more...

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Now if you substituted the words "cat 5e" with "coaxial", i would agree with you. In a coaxial cable the return conductor (copper braid / foil), surrounds the central signal conductor and is grounded at each end, shielding the central signal carrying wire.

UTP, or unshielded twisted pair works differently; the two wires are twisted symetrically around each other along the length of the cable. UTP uses differential signaling, meaning that the transcievers aren't concerned about the voltage of one of the two (or 4, or 8, etc) wires to ground, but rather just the voltage between them. Because they're twisted around each other, an outside interference acts on both cables in oposite directions, canceling out. The tighter the twisting, the better the noise reduction.

This is also the reason why you can get into ground loop problems with coaxial ethernet, cable tv, etc but not with UTP. Because none of the cables in a UTP connection are grounded to each chasis, there is no ohmic connection between the devices, then thus no potential for ground loop problems. With coaxial however, more care has to be taken into ensuring that both chasis have a good solid building ground. Ever wonder why BNC terminators (for the few of you who remember em) sometimes had little chains at the end of them? Grounding.

-Chris

there are 40 wires (1 not used = 39 i guess).  But around each of these wires is another wire that is grounded.  The same way the cat 5e wires work.  Another wire (grounded) wraps the communicating wire to prevent cross-talk or stray capacitance!!!...

SCSA

199566[/snapback]

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Actually, I and quite a lot of other people I know know that the - in DVD-R stands for dash but still call them minus. But DVD minus R is easier to say DVD dash R. Calling them DVD Rs is just confusing. Also, it helps set them apart from DVD+R much easy. I think the + guys were quite smart since by doing what they did, not only did they get the people who don't know on their side, most of the people who do know still call it that probably for the reasons I mentioned except for a few who are either pedantic or DVD-R fanatics :-P

199958[/snapback]

Yes, but I AM pedantic. :P

Mostly though, I just prefer to call things by their correct names.

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