Quitch

Swap file where

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I'm putting together a new machine, one drive for the OS and one for the apps (mostly games). Should I put the swapfile on drive 1 or 2?

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Drive 2. It's even better if the drive is on a separate channel.

Virtual Memory in Windows XP

I'm guessing you're using Windows....?

Thanks for the link... fascinating article, and thank god someone realises it's the total combined that matters. Don't agree with everything he said, since I'd say that if you can afford to, you're better off simply buying more memory than you will ever need, since the second you dip into the pagefile you just reduced performance (unless it was done during idle time).

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Yeah use the fastest disk for the O/S, and the slower for the swap file.  If they are the same, then i would put the O/S and progs on the same drive, and swap / data on the second.

SCSA

I tried this and found system boot-up and map load times in UT2004 noticably slower. My "fast" drive was a 10K, 72MB/s drive and my slow drive was an 80gb per platter 7200rpm drive. I have 512MB ram.

Just using the 10K drive for OS, programs and swap was much better than the 2 drive setup.

Now what I'm trying is I have 2 10K drives of the same type. The 73GB 10K is my os, apps drive. The 36GB 10K is my swap disk and the 7200rpm is for data storage.

Boot-up might be slightly faster over the single disk, but UT2004 performance doesn't seem much different. Nothing that I can tell at least.

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Here is a question. Is it possible with Windows XP to create a swap partition that is usable, but does not contain a drive letter? This would make it so its like Linux, but the swap parting would not show up as a drive that you could access via windows explorer.

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OK correction, the pagefile.sys, but the answer seem to still be no. you can create a drive and mount it as a folder, but the swap file needs to reside with the root of the partition for some reason. oh well.

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Windows pages, it does not swap.

So, the answer is no.

So? Linux pages as well. Old habits die hard so swapping and paging tend to be used to describe the same thing (paging) even though computer science distinguishes between them.

The use of a partition or a file as the secondary storage and the "visibility" of the associated drive letter has no relation to the fact that Windows pages.

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