Guest Eugene

Seagate Savvio 10K.1

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Guest Eugene

For the better part of two decades, the standard for hard drive chassis has rested with the 3.5" form factor. In an effort to integrate more spindles per cubic foot, however, industry-giant Seagate has started shifting its enterprise-oriented offerings towards a more svelte 2.5" standard. How does the firm's first implementation stack up? Let's take a closer look at the Savvio 10K.1!

Seagate Savvio 10K.1 Review

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Just a few typos I noticed:

It is important to note again that the lower seek time predominately arises from the smaller distances that the Savvio's actuator must travel rather than from a the actuator sporting more power.

Should say "...Savvio's actuator must travel, rather than from the actuator sporting more power."

The following results serve only as a reference; SR does not factor them into final judgmentsand recommends that readers do the sameT.

Missing space and extra T.

Subjective impressions concur- this is a remarkable silent drive when idle.

Remarkable should be remarkably.

In fact, StorageReview will soon demonstrate, today's 5400 RPM notebook drives, sharing the same form factor as the Savvio, give the drive a run for its money.

Should say, "In fact, as StorageReview..."

Thanks for the article. It was an interesting read, even though I'm not looking for drives.

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Yes, anal is a better word. Anyway, I think that this drive does have a place in the hdd world. The world of devices that require low heat, low noise, and ultra reliability. Unfortunately, as already pointed out, not for the desktop market! It will be interesting how many units are actually sold period. Will the unit actually selll in the retail market!!!...

SCSA

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And it would be able to setup 8 drive (atleast) 1U boxes... or 24 drive 3U boxes, compared to todays 4 drive and 14/15 drive.

More space on few U's == $$$

Darking

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Quick question. I noticed in this review that the single page view is gone. Was that intentional?

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Will the unit actually selll in the retail market!!!...

Er, I think the review answers that question adequately.

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It is important to note again that the lower seek time predominately arises from the smaller distances that the Savvio's actuator must travel rather than from the actuator sporting more power. The other 10,000 RPM designs listed above would approach or even beat the Savvio's score were they short-stroked down to 73 gigs. They would, however, remain just as bulky as always, relatively speaking.
Is there any chance that you will do a comparison between the performance of the Savvio and the performance of short-stroked competitive drives? Otherwise, this statement is a bald assertion left begging for evidence to support it.

Other than this point, I thought the article was up to your usual standards of thoroughness and integrity.

Phil

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Your Leaderboard comment:

"... Finally, the Seagate Savvio 10K.1 leverages a smaller form factor to easily turn in the best random access performance of any 10K RPM hard drive"

I'm not sure I see this in the random IO numbers. Savvio seems to be significantly trailing Maxtor and Fujitsu except on Q1 where it's on par.

Savvio did better than 10K.7 but that's not saying much.

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