bfg9000

10,000rpm 2.5" Drives

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Actually I'm stoked, this product is what I've been waiting for, there is another review they posted on the front page of 2cpu.com that shows a caddy that holds SIX of these baby's in a single 5.25" bay!!

anyway I'm waiting for cheaper (MUCH) 7.2k rpm versions of atleast 120gig (or a sweet spot of a dollar a gig at around that size) and I'll grab heaps of em, put this together with a broadcom 8 channel controller that allows you to put 4 x of these on each of it's channels(multi-lane) and I'll have some serious performence and storage! *wet dream*

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Actually I'm stoked, this product is what I've been waiting for, there is another review they posted on the front page of 2cpu.com that shows a caddy that holds SIX of these baby's in a single 5.25" bay!!

I have seen the picture from trade shows, but this is not possible.

The Savvio drives are 70x15mm, but half-height is only 150x40mm.

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I thought the Savvio's were 15K Drives. I'm a little surprised that they spin at 10K are there 15K's in the works?

No, IIRC they were always 10K drives. Have not heard anything about 15K 2.5" drives, though I'm sure they'll happen *eventually*.

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The multi-user, and low-level tests on the Savvio are done for those who are curious.

I paired the Savvio up against the 10K V, and the WD740GD here, if you want to see it in action.

I'm quite surprised by the performance. I expected it to be much better. It seems they took advantage of the smaller platter size, not to increase positional performance, but save costs by using a slower actuator. 4.4ms is quite impressive, but not spectacular considering the new platters. Also, despite the slightly speedier access times the drive is unable to pull ahead of the 10K V in multi-user tests.

I've always been most excited for Fujitsu's 2.5" 10K offering. I still am.

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Actually I'm stoked, this product is what I've been waiting for, there is another review they posted on the front page of 2cpu.com that shows a caddy that holds SIX of these baby's in a single 5.25" bay!!

I have seen the picture from trade shows, but this is not possible.

The Savvio drives are 70x15mm, but half-height is only 150x40mm.

I assume it's not six in the front, but spread in the length too.

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Also, despite the slightly speedier access times the drive is unable to pull ahead of the 10K V in multi-user tests.

I've always been most excited for Fujitsu's 2.5" 10K offering.  I still am.

Does that test use the entire range of cylinders/sectors or does it only use the first part of the drive?

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Also, despite the slightly speedier access times the drive is unable to pull ahead of the 10K V in multi-user tests.

I've always been most excited for Fujitsu's 2.5" 10K offering.  I still am.

Does that test use the entire range of cylinders/sectors or does it only use the first part of the drive?

It uses the entire drive.

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One thing I think of when I see this is that most SCSI drives use signifigantly smaller platters than desktop 3.5inch drives. I don't know if they are small enough to fit the 2.5 inch form factor but I see this as more of shrinking the rest of the drive than using smaller platters. As for the discussion of raided 2.5 inch drives it I believe most of this was done with notebook drives that are quite a bit thinner than these drives.

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Most 10K drives (SCSI and Raptor) use 84 mm disks. I think Fujitsu uses the smaller, 2.5" media (forget the metric size), just like all 15K drives.

Even desktop drives will eventually convert over to the smaller, 2.5" form factor. It should be interesting to see when it actually happens, though.

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This is possible because they use 9mm high notebook drives.

The fujitsu ones are unlike any 2.5" drive of the last few years not 9 or 12.5mm, but 15mm thick, so they wouldnt fit...

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Most 7.2K drives use 95mm media. This allows the most GB/HDD in a 3.5" FF.

Most 10K drives use 84mm media. This is primarily for reduced power.

Most 15K drives use 70mm media. This is primarily for reduced power.

2.5" FF 10K drives use 65mm media. This is a limitation of the Form Factor.

2.5" SCSI drives are not designed to outperform their larger brethren in one-on-one comparisons. They're designed to provide a means of getting more IOPS per cubic foot (or meter if you're metric) by distributing the workload over more spindles, but in the same space occupied by a less dense 3.5" FF array. They improvement in IOPS comes with a steep $/GB price premium over 3.5" form factor drives. 2.5" Server drives only provide 1/4 the capacity per unit compared to their 3.5" brethren (the Savvio is only available in a 2 platter 73G vs. the Atlas 10K V 4 platter 300GB).

To make a performance analysis meaningful, you need to fit as many 3.5" HDDs into a given volume, and as many 2.5" HDDs into the same volume, and then test the resultant array's performance. Since most array performance scales with the number of drives in the array, the 2.5" HDD array should win (though based on the Savvio numbers, I'm not so sure...)

The problem is that while 2.5" 10K will deliver more IOPS/Sq.Ft. in your data center, they don't come close to providing the same GB/Sq.Ft..

If you're limited on floor space and you need more performance and you *don't* care about capacity, 2.5" is the solution for you. Few if any data center operators are going to find themselves in this position.

If you aren't limited on floor space, and/or capacity is an important consideration, 2.5" is not going to look very attractive. Most data center operators are in this position, where 2.5" FF 10K will not provide any advantages worth the added cost and lower density.

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yeahhhh, size is a problem for me unfortunatly(I'm going to need to drop box dimensions)..I'm noticing that the drives used in the formentioned review are SATA, I diden't realise Lappies were using SATA connectors yet, which would lead me to believe that their designing these drives to eventually be used in the desktop market.

I realise that the sivvo units are not going to fit into this caddy, but I was attempting to demonstrate that they can pump up the spindle speeds quite easily should they chose, and I imagine the smaller drives might end up being a very reasonable offering, I'm just curious how long this is going to be..

anyone got any insider info on 7.2k version of these ? ( would be willing to pay say..a 30% premium to move to these if they had 120gig versions over the current 200GB 7.2k drives)

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Can I put it in my laptop. Thats all i care about.  :D

No.

...though I expect some niche laptop makers might design a desktop replacement model that can use the 15mm high form factor.

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