alanx

Where is you MFT?

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Thank you for you comments. Sorry about the contention.

Hi alanx!

I like good and healthy discussions, carried in a nice tone. You and most of us are able to do that.

I wouldn't dream of telling someone that they are wrong because there is always the possibility that I am wrong. I would rather initiate a discussion on how our conflicting conclusions were reached and hopefully work it out.

Usually, I sit on my hands to prevent me from typing when I get "insulted" but this time I was a bit more spontaneous. I can't say that I regret my reaction but I would rather not have had it.

Thanks to You too and everyone else, for Your input to this forum!

Christer

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I wouldn't dream of telling someone that they are wrong because there is always the possibility that I am wrong.

Chicken. ;)

-- Rick

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And proven to be right when he thought he was wrong, too!

(Ref: Einstein's "greatest mistake")

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Actually, having the MFT in the center of the partition is the best place to have it. The OS looks in the MFT to find the location of a file. Then it moves the head to that location to read or write the file. Having the MFT in the center is the shortest distance to the rest of the partition. Shortens access time a little.

All the XP and Win2003 installs I have done, the MFT is in the center of the partition.

Bozo :D

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Actually, having the MFT in the center of the partition is the best place to have it.

If you said "in the center of the data," I would agree with you, but it is very clear that having the MFT in the center of the partition is counter productive in this case:

CAnal.gif

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Your right as long as you don't put anything on your hard drive.

But as your hard drive fills, having the Pagefile in the center shortens the access time.

Picture your chart with the hard drive almost full, and the Pagefile at the beginning of the partition. It's a long way to the other end of your data.

Bozo :D

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True, but hard drives are rarely full, especially one's OS and applications drive. I would say my OS takes up about 1-2 GB and my main apps take up maybe 2-3 GB... that's 4-5 GB of space that almost all of my frequently used files reside in. How big are most peoples' drives? 80 GB now?

If you use an intelligent defragger like Norton Speed Disk, which places your most frequently used files together at the front of the drive (I think WinXP does something like that as well), then putting your pagefile and MFT at the center of the drive is counterproductive. Even if you somehow have filled your drive to capacity, being in the middle of all your files is not what's important necessarily -- it's being in the middle of your most frequently used files. I would be willing to bet the 80/20 rule is a good guide here: you use 20% of your files 80% of the time.

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That makes sense.

On a related note, I received my sales email from perfectdisk, and noted that one of their reasons for buying the product is:

"PerfectDisk is the only defragger that optimally places the Master File Table (MFT) where Microsoft recommends for improved performance."

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Interesting. I just ran Perfectdisk both on line and off line twice. The MFT is still near the center (offset towards the outside of the hard drive slightly) with the Pagefile right behind it.

Bozo :D

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As an experiment, I loaded a partition to it's max. Then I ran Perfectdisk (analize mode) and found that the MFT had been moved more towards the end of the hard drive, but still near the center. (about 2/3 back from the beginning.) After running Perfectdisk offline, the MFT is moved towards the front of the hard drive(about 1/3 back from the beginning).

One more interesting thing. I disabled File Indexing and the MFT is now only about 10% of it's original size. Cool

Bozo :D

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The Green got smaller.

Right click on a partition in Explorer. Choose 'Properties'. At the bottom of the menu you can disable the indexing 'feature'.

Bozo :D

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To definitely stop indexing of files, disable the Indexing Service. If the service is left enabled (default = manual ...... :unsure: ...... I think) then it has been known to get started "by itself".

Christer

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I usually disable the Indexing service and uncheck the Index this drive option in drive properties... but I do wonder: what is indexing used for? In what circumstances would it be useful to have it enabled? I assume it's normally not that useful. Is it only useful in speeding up searching? Does it have advantages when your drive is being browsed over the network, for example, or in any other situation?

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Your right as long as you don't  put anything on your hard drive.

What I said was that the MFT should go in the center of the data. That makes me right under all data loads. :)

-- Rick

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One more interesting thing. I disabled File Indexing and the MFT is now only about 10% of it's original size. Cool

Bozo :D

There is "Indexing Servcie" in Computer Management/Disk Management/Properties and also "Indexing Service" in Windows Services.

Which one or both did you disable?

Any downside to doing this?

Thanks.

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