konxl

Advantage of DVD burner 8MB buffer vs 2MB?

Recommended Posts

I checked the market and found out that most DVD burners only have 2MB buffer. However, some brands like Plextor and BenQ market burners with 8MB buffer.

My question is: Do we really need 8MB buffer for DVD burners? Seem to me that many big name brands like Sony, LG etc don't think so. '

Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At DVD burning speeds (1.35 MB/s is 1x), a 2MB buffer would be burned through in 1/10th of a second (at the newest 16x speed,) where an 8MB buffer would last a whopping 1/3rd of a second. (Both are rounded.) Obviously, at these speeds, that increase in buffer size doesn't do much good to prevent buffer underruns. But every DVD burner I've seen has some form of buffer underrun protection, so I don't think it really matters. (Now, if someone had a DVD burner with a 64MB buffer, which would last almost 3 seconds, that might be worth it...)

Back when CD-R speeds were only 8x, and an 8MB buffer lasted almost 8 seconds, it was worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I recall correctly, technology that can pause burns (i.e. prevent buffer underruns) puts some sort of a "gap" into the track. The gap is corrected for by the reader's error correction circuitry, you basically end up with a (very slightly) damaged CD or DVD.

Assuming perfectly elastic, spherical cows, i.e. there will be NO further damage done to the DVD, you'll probably be okay. But, at the spot of buffer underrun, where the protection kicked in, you end up with compromised error correction capability. If any more damage occurs at that spot, you probably won't be able to recover your data.

Therefore, anything that reduces the chances of a buffer underrun is good by me. If your PC chokes for .2 seconds, it's good to have that buffer. I actually wish I could permanently disable buffer underrun protection so that I know that a CD I burn is done at reference quality, without these weakly error-corrected spots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Therefore, anything that reduces the chances of a buffer underrun is good by me.  If your PC chokes for .2 seconds, it's good to have that buffer.  I actually wish I could permanently disable buffer underrun protection so that I know that a CD I burn is done at reference quality, without these weakly error-corrected spots.

Ditto! I don't think my 52x Lite-On CD-RW allows that (disabling burn-proof), I don't know about my 4x NEC DVD burner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As adding this "gap" takes up some valuable space each time, you may still end up with a coaster if data is interrupted a few times while you are trying to burn a nearly full CD or DVD.

There is a lot of burning software that allows you to turn off this feature, or at least warns you if it has been triggered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

also, keep in mind that your cd burning software also has a cache....even burning at 8X dvd, neither nero's cache or the 2MB plextor cache never drop below 50%.......

IOW, i wouldn't worry about it.

-Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Back when CD-R speeds were only 8x, and an 8MB buffer lasted almost 8 seconds, it was worth it.

pretty much everything you said is right except this last statement so i had to nitpick.. at 8x the buffer will run out at ~8000KB / 1200KB/s = 6.6666666(...) seconds :) another thing is when the 8x burners were around there wasn't a single CD-R/W drive out with an 8MB buffer. The largest was 4MB. The largest buffer on a CD-RW period was on a Yamaha CRW-F1 44x24x44 drive which was 8MB.

p.s. i know this is kind of a useless post but what are you gonna do

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Back when CD-R speeds were only 8x, and an 8MB buffer lasted almost 8 seconds, it was worth it.

pretty much everything you said is right except this last statement so i had to nitpick.. at 8x the buffer will run out at ~8000KB / 1200KB/s = 6.6666666(...) seconds :) another thing is when the 8x burners were around there wasn't a single CD-R/W drive out with an 8MB buffer. The largest was 4MB. The largest buffer on a CD-RW period was on a Yamaha CRW-F1 44x24x44 drive which was 8MB.

p.s. i know this is kind of a useless post but what are you gonna do

hehe... Yeah, so I estimated badly. And I had a Yamaha with an 8MB buffer back in '98. Sorry, I don't recall the model number, but it was either my 4x CD-R, or my 8x CD-R / 4x CD-RW. But I remember what a big deal it was at the time.

As for disabling buffer-underrun protection? I believe that most CD-RW drives disable it if you tell it to burn at 4x or below. (If you read most CD-RW drive manuals, they say that for 'maximum compatibility' burn at 4x or below, even on fast media.) I don't know about DVD-RW drives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The dye in writable media is designed to be burned at a set speed or range of speeds. This has to do with the sensitivity of the dye. If the dye is not sensitive enough the information will not "keep". If the dye is too sensitive stray light from the lazer will actually modify the data on tracks neighboring the current sector which will result in a similar situation where the data will not be easily readable.

4x used to be recommended, but with current disks I believe 8-16x produces the best burn quality. This is something that can easily be tested with the right reader and software utilities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I actually wish I could permanently disable buffer underrun protection so that I know that a CD I burn is done at reference quality, without these weakly error-corrected spots.

If you use Nero, if buffer underrun protection kicked in during the recording process, a popup dialogue will appear when the recording is completed and tell you how many times it happened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

whatever odeen has said is just a theory, since you can never achieve refernce quality with consumer level burners. the closest you'll come will be the 8x audiomaster mode in yamaha drives or the plextor's varirec option where you always record CLV and have an option of sacrificing some of the discs capacity in order for larger pits and lands. the gap you receive with burnproof, powerrec, justlink or smarburn is tiny and well under the limits of being a hard c2 or a burst error (~100um). basically what i'm saying is the initial quality a of consumer level drive produced burn is commensurable with the possiblity of underrun protection caused deterioration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now