Fuzzy

Rounded IDE cables

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for what it's worth, ive been using high quality rounded shielded ide and scsi cables for close to 4 years now and i've never had any issues. 1 device per 18" cable for 8 ide drive in a 3ware array and 3 scsi hdds connected a 3 device 30" cable atm. i've used cables built by vantec and cables2go as well as firstcableline and i've put together boxes with those and i have yet to encounter a problem. i'm not building tons of boxes i guess that partially accounts for my luck with rounded cables but i never skimp on the quality and always get the shortest cable possible.

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@rfarris:

I take it you don't have the tool for removing flat-cable connectors. You should never, ever disconnect a connector by pulling on its associated cable.

No, I don't have any such tool. I will Google search to see if they are interesting.

So then why is it you are so acquainted with detecting damaged cables? :-)

-- Rick

In a flat cable you can see all the wires all along the cable. Then, if a wire is broken

(for example, because of manufacturing fault), you can see it very easily.

Furthermore, if you use a powerful lamp, you can see the inner metalic conductor of each wire.

I once purchased a flat cable, and it had a small dent. The plastic was not broken, but the inner conductor of a wire was partially broken:

P8100005detail.jpg

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Your points are mizirable how often you pull cables away?

I will make full replay later but u should not remove them by pulling on cable (flat or rounded) anyway unless u want them damaged.

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No, I don't have any such tool. I will Google search to see if they are interesting.

To be perfectly honest, I pull on cables, too, but each and everytime I do it, first I figure out if I can get it out (conveniently) without pulling on the cable, and if I decide to pull on the cable I am careful to distribute the force over as many connections as possible. Typically I put my forefinger alongside the connector and then lay the cable over the top of my finger and kind of rotate my hand so that the force is applied all along the width of the cable.

I never, ever tell myself "this is ok, everybody does it."

In another life, when I worked in manufacturing repairing computers, I had all the proper tools, including the aforementioned connector puller.

Here's a picture:

ET10.GIF

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that's actually a pretty neat tool, i think the primary function was as an eprom prying tool but you could use it on tons of other junk. i have a few kicking around still from the old days ;)

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I'd like to add that most high end server drive cables are rounded. If it's good enough for my IBM 365 servers and bladeservers, it should be good enough for my home PC. The difference could be cable quality - the IBM cables don't look special, but maybe they are...

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@z_unit:

Your points are mizirable

:lol:

how often you pull cables away?

all the time

I pull them away like an animal :lol:

I will make full replay later

OMG :o

but u should not remove them by pulling on cable (flat or rounded) anyway unless u want them damaged.

okay, lets see if I can find one of those tools posted by rfarris...

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@rfarris:

To be perfectly honest, I pull on cables, too,

aaah, you finally confess

I never, ever tell myself "this is ok, everybody does it."

oh, then you are excused!... You pull them, but not because everyone pull them. You pull them because its your OWN choice! WELL DONE!

keep on pulling !! :D

but each and everytime I do it, first I figure out if I can get it out (conveniently) without pulling on the cable, and if I decide to pull on the cable I am careful to distribute the force over as many connections as possible. Typically I put my forefinger alongside the connector and then lay the cable over the top of my finger and kind of rotate my hand so that the force is applied all along the width of the cable.

yes, I also try to distribute the force evenly over the cable. But sometimes its not easy to use the hand properly, depending how the case is built, and where is the drive placed. That is also why I guess I will have difficulties to use the tool shown in your photo.

In another life, when I worked in manufacturing repairing computers, I had all the proper tools, including the aforementioned connector puller.

but is it convenient to use? do you need open space behind the drive to put the tool (and your hand), and then pull back? or you can use it from the side?

I feel it won't be easy.

Besides, it seems that you don't use it :rolleyes:

@TobySmurf:

I'd like to add that most high end server drive cables are rounded. If it's good enough for my IBM 365 servers and bladeservers, it should be good enough for my home PC. The difference could be cable quality - the IBM cables don't look special, but maybe they are...

well, after all, maybe even NASA uses them for the most critical missions :lol:

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that's actually a pretty neat tool, i think the primary function was as an eprom prying tool but you could use it on tons of other junk.  i have a few kicking around still from the old days  ;)

Actually, that one *is* a chip puller. (Worst job I ever had -- installing roms in big circuit boards. If you're not careful, it's easy to embed one of those babies in your thumb.)

I couldn't find a picture of the ones made for IDE connectors. They are a little wider on the top, and I never had one with a fancy yellow plastic cover on the handle. I think they used to come from AMP and 3M -- free with every few miles of cable. :)

--Rick

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