mtakedown

No gigabit support in 915/925 chipsets

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Every new chipset is supposed to be an improvement over the previous. The 865 and 875 supported CSA gigabit Ethernet. Why did Intel drop this in their new chipsets?

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intel put centrino's wireless networking capabilites into the chipset instead... However motherboard vendors do have boards out, with gigabit eithernet, Gigabyte for one, already has such a board.

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I'd rather have Intel Gb into the chipset than WiFi.

At least one can be certain that an Intel Gb NIC is actually quality material. Many mainboards with Gb NICs use Realtek chips.

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I agree with HMTK - Gigabit Ethernet is a frozen, well-established standard. Wireless standards are mutating like crazy. What's the standard of today? B -> G-> N? Who knows. Building wireless into the chipset seems rather limiting compared to Gig E - unless Intel intentionally WANTS your chipset to age poorly... ;)

Future Shock

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I think there is no real need for CSA anymore.

915/925 have 20 PCI Express lanes

Thinking of an Board with one 16x and two 1x PCI Express Slots the Chipset has still the possibility to connect a GBit NIC onboard using 2x PCI Express (i.e. up to 4GBit Full Duplex). That should be a good replacement for CSA.

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I think there is no real need for CSA anymore.

915/925 have 20 PCI Express lanes

Thinking of an Board with one 16x and two 1x PCI Express Slots the Chipset has still the possibility to connect a GBit NIC onboard using 2x PCI Express (i.e. up to 4GBit Full Duplex). That should be a good replacement for CSA.

Absolutely. The only reason to have CSA in the first place was because PCI couldn't handle the full bandwidth of Gigabit Ethernet. In a chipset that can support PCI Express (which has no problem with Gigabit Ethernet), there's no need for an ad-hoc, proprietary standard like CSA. Welcome back separate NICs... ;-)

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Thinking of an Board with one 16x and two 1x PCI Express Slots the Chipset has still the possibility to connect a GBit NIC onboard using 2x PCI Express (i.e. up to 4GBit Full Duplex). That should be a good replacement for CSA.

So why not do this? It is going to take longer for third party companies (linksys, dlink, etc.) to make PCI Express nics that if intel placed them on the board.

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So why not do this?  It is going to take longer for third party companies (linksys, dlink, etc.) to make PCI Express nics that if intel placed them on the board.

They do. I think pretty much every 9xx board I've seen has PCI-E GbE built in except the ones from Abit.

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Intel Centrino, incidentally, does NOT have chipset-level wireless.

Centrino means you have a Pentium M chip (Banias or Dothian), a supporting 855-series chipset, and either a Pro/2100 or Pro/2200BG mini-PCI wireless card. Operating word: Mini-PCI

The southbridge on my "Centrino" Gateway M505X is an ICH4M, which seems to be a low-voltage version of ye olde ICH4 (6 USB 2.0 ports / built-in 10/100, etc).

My M505X used to display the blue/pink heart-shaped Centrino logo every bootup until I took the Pro/2100 out and put in a Dell Truemobile 1400, which is a Broadcom-based 802.11G card. The logo on bootup switched to the blue/yellow "Pentium M"

So, by switching a user-removable component, I de-centrinized my laptop.

As far as the subject at hand goes.. Does the ICH6 still have a 10/100 MAC built-in? I couldn't care less about GBE, but I feel that having chipset-level networking that doesn't go through a general-purpose bus is more efficient - lower latencies, less potential for hardware conflicts, etc. I think it's a waste implementing external PCI or PCI-E chips when all you need is a PHY for basic networking capabilities.

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