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Linux Instal On Old Hardware.

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Ive kludged togethor a little machine to install linux on, in order to get more experience with it. However the install always fails at the 'searching for infofile' line.

Ive got a Supermicro 370DE6 motherboard (serverworks chipset), 2xP3 1GHz, 2GB RAM, Geforce 256 video card, ICP-Vortex 4 port SATA raid card, (1 drive, seagate 160gb, I just dont want to boot off the motherboard's IDE controller). Useing SuSE Linux 9.1...Ive tried safe settings, ACPI disabled, ect... whatever type of install I try fails at the same spot. Any suggestions?

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You call that an "old" computer? I thought you meant a Pentium 90 or something like that.

Anyway, can you boot from a non-SuSE boot CD (such as Knoppix or Gentoo)? You might want to try a different CD-ROM.

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You call that an "old" computer?  I thought you meant a Pentium 90 or something like that.

Anyway, can you boot from a non-SuSE boot CD (such as Knoppix or Gentoo)?  You might want to try a different CD-ROM.

Ive used Knoppix before. I can't seem to find my CD, so Iam downloading a new one... Gentoo is a little beyond me right now... Ive used the SuSE media on other systems, so I know its good.

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Gentoo is a little beyond me right now...

I didn't mean install gentoo. I meant boot off the gentoo CD (which has automatic hardware detection) to see if you can get to the root prompt. If you can do that without seeing errors, then your hardware is supported and it's the SuSE installation disk that's causing the problem.

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S-ata is not well supproted in linux. I'd recomend you stay away from it for now, unless you have a 3ware or or possibly ICH5 ...something with good driver support.

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Or if you want to install linux on SATA disk, you'll need installer with 2.6 series kernel (or 2.4.27->). And you probably still can't use your raid features. I installed debian with beta installer on my KT400A/VT8237 based system. Check if your installer has boot options, for SATA-support or using 2.6-series kernel.

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Ok... I just checked. Suse 9.1 apparently comes with 2.6 kernel. :( So that's probably not your problem. Sorry for unhelpful posts. :(

Not unhelpful at all... Thinking about what could be wrong helps...

;)

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Interesting. Quite possibly a Suse thing --> if you submit "searching for infofile" in google, all the top hits are for Suse. I browsed through them quickly but didn't see any general solution, although they may still be worth a look for you as a few suggestions were outlined.

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Ok. Ive now tried it on 4 different computers. (all with some version of this motherboard or other) and does Linux work with Grand champion chipsets?

3 of the motherboards just go to sleep 'looking for infofile' while the 4th will actually start to install linux, only to die a sudden death after the first boot.

Ive also tried a red hat fedroa core. (not sure of the version, I found it in a box of junk) and it does the same thing. (suicide on first boot)....

Whats up with this?

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I cannot speak for SuSe, but Gentoo, Debian and Red Hat ES all love serverworks Grand Champion chipsets, including the HE version of the chipset.

Michael

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I should add that supermicro boards can be finicky things to install on, quite often with Red Hat ES we had to use the command line parameter noprobe to get it to install.

Michael

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I will add that while Gentoo is a *great* way to learn more about the inner workings of linux, it is *not* fast. Make sure you have a weekend set aside to follow the handbook instructions - it will often take that long. It has become my distro of choice even though it still shows occasional signs of being "immature".

Michael

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I was thinking of just getting the kernel or base install from gentoo. Then using SuSE to install KDE and YaST.

Ummm, how is that going to work?

I dont know. I was just thinking. Not trying yet...

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Ya, Iam begining to think, I'll have to get gentoo, and figure out how to build my own linux...

Gentoo's install is largely automated. If you really want Gentoo, and want to build it from the ground up, you would need to go back to 0.9 or so.

If you want to build your distribution and really see how everything works, and you are a masochist, try LFS (Linux From Scratch). It is a neat educational toy, but it lacks certain handy things like, say, a package management system, so it isn't something you would want to use for anything but learning and gee-wiz factor.

(Granted, it is Linux, so you can implement a package system, or use an existing one, but then why not really go all out and implement your own POSIX OS in assembly language. After a certain point, mental exercises become more trouble than they are worth).

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I will add that while Gentoo is a *great* way to learn more about the inner workings of linux, it is *not* fast.  Make sure you have a weekend set aside to follow the handbook instructions - it will often take that long.  It has become my distro of choice even though it still shows occasional signs of being "immature".

Michael

GPM and stage-3 installs make the process muuuuch faster, though for some reason I always do a stage 1.

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I do remember installing gentoo back in the 0.9 days. Man, that was rough. The documentation at the time was not always accurate, either. Learned a lot, though. Since 1.4 (now 2004.X series), the installation has been pretty straightforward with lots of automatic hardware detection and very good documentation. Starting from stage 3 is pretty quick, though, and you will be hard pressed to notice the difference in speed between a base install optimized for Athlon/P4/whatever versus a generic i686 (i.e. starting from stage 1 or stage 3).

As for the earlier idea of starting with gentoo, but using SuSE's rpm's for apps... I meant no disrespect, but this simply doesn't fly. It's best to go all gentoo, or all SuSE, etc... FWIW, I have at least half a dozen gentoo and debian systems currently running on serverworks boards (CNB20LE). In fact, these same systems used to run SuSE 7.3 before I switched distros.

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Gentoo 0.9 was disgusting, at least with LFS you *expected* it to be a pain in the ass...

I still can't help thinking there is something common with those machines *other* than the mobo that is causing your problems. Perhaps some kind of funky SCSI CD-ROM? Old old BIOS?

Serverworks is normally a very stable chipset, even if they have the worst IDE implementation in history...

Michael

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Ive kludged togethor a little machine to install linux on, in order to get more experience with it. However the install always fails at the 'searching for infofile' line.

Try another install CD.

Ive tried 3. 2 SuSE and 1 redhat. The SuSE'ers do the same thing. And the hatters install, but die at first boot.

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