HisMajestyTheKing

Noise Driving Me Crazy

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I already replaced my Papst 8412NGML with a 8412NGLE (only 1500 rpm vs 2500 rpm). I clearly hear the difference. Now the 80 mm on my CPU has to go. Too bad I can't easily get it off the heatsink so I'll get an entire heatsink/fan combo. The CPU is an Athlon XP 2400+ (T-Bred), the mainboard an Asus A7V600. I was looking at a Zalman CNPS7000A/B-AlCu. Does anyone have experience with these things? It's something I can easily find and it should be compatible with my mainboard, have to check for mounting holes around the socket.

Any other, compatible and silent suggestions are welcome as well.

I don't overclock and when I probably won't upgrade the CPU in this machine anymore. It doesn't have to be an iceberg either as long as it runs withing spec.

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Put a resistor in series with the fan. I did that on my system. You cut the red wire going to the fan, solder an appropriately sized resistor (one lead to each side of the cut wire), cover with heat shrink tubing, and the fan will run slower. I dropped my fan voltage down to about 8V. To figure the size of your resistor, use the equation R=V/I. V in this case is the amount of volts you want to drop (4 volts in my case), and I is the fan current at whatever the new voltage is (I forgot what mine was, but let's say 0.25 amp). This gives you R= 4/0.25, or 16 ohms. For most fans a resistor with a wattage rating of 1 watt should suffice.

Another idea is to connect an 8V regulator to one of the 12V outputs of the power supply and then run all your fans off the output of the regulator.

I purchased a new quiet power supply (the ones with the 120mm variable speed fan) earlier this year because my old supply was getting flaky. Anyway, it made such a big difference in noise that I decided to take other measures to quiet the system. First I disconnected the case fan. No problem with temps and the system was quieter. After that I disconnected the processor fan. No go-the system overheated so I decided to undervolt it instead. Now the processor still runs under 40°C but the system is barely audible even at night.

On another note, it is certainly possible to get rid of the amount of heat generated by most systems by turning the case into a huge passive heat sink rather than using noisy fans. As a bonus the system will stay clean inside. Other than possibly costing a little more, I don't know why this method isn't used. The hard drives would be the only noise source. With proper mounting they would be inaudible.

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On another note, it is certainly possible to get rid of the amount of heat generated by most systems by turning the case into a huge passive heat sink rather than using noisy fans.  As a bonus the system will stay clean inside.  Other than possibly costing a little more, I don't know why this method isn't used.  The hard drives would be the only noise source.  With proper mounting they would be inaudible.

JTR - the case you want is HERE.

I want one BADLY - but I understand they are about $700, and are fairly heavy too...of course, this will be cloned eventually, and probably come down to $200-300 or so.

Future Shock

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I want one too! B) That's pretty much the idea I had- and it would work even better with a 35W CPU like the one in my machine. Maybe a new M/B form factor is in order here. Let's call it ATX-Q (Q for quiet). You put the processor and any other heat generating components near the top (or back) of the case. You use an aluminum or copper plate to conduct heat away from the component to the huge passive heat sink located either on top or in back, and do away with the expensive heat pipe. You can sell different plates for different processors in case you can't design a one size fits all. You have the power supply passively cooled (all the heat generating components are connected to a heat sink on the part of the supply which faces towards the back). You have hard drive mounts which are thermally coupled to the outside of the case but acoustically isolated if possible. Once SSDs come out you no longer have even this noise source to worry about. Net result-near silent computing now, and in a few years totally silent computing.

The only problem I've noticed is that when my machine is off I can hear my monitor, and when that's off I can hear a very faint buzz from the fluorescent fixture on my bedroom ceiling. Yes, the light is electronically ballasted, and hence much quieter than those old magnetic ballasts. However, electronic ballasts vary in their noise levels-some are slightly audible while others are dead silent.

Now if we can only silence those damned airplanes that fly overhead every few minutes all would be well with the world!

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I use an $8 speeze cooler for my 2400+ and it is silent when the case is closed...

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I guess I should add that it is only silent because it is hooked to a zlaman fanmate.

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I'm not a total PC silence fanatic, but I do like my systems to not sound like portable generators ;) I have one system with a Zalman CNPS 7000A AlCu heatsink/fan and I'm pretty happy with it. It comes with a Zalman Fanmate too; so you can adjust its fan RPMs, but even at max rpms I can't hear the heatsink fan over other louder components in my case. Keeps my 2.8C@ 3.08 Ghz fairly cool; right now MBM is reporting 45C while running D2OL, ambient temp is 25C. (yes I know mb temp reports are not that great, but its not bad for something I really can't hear)

The only maybe worrisome part of that heatsink is that the 92mm fan is built in and not really a replaceable part. So far its been quiet, but if it ever gets loud you'll be stuck with it unless you are willing to yank it off and try to align another fan in the same spot and glue (I think its glued on) it down.

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ahh.. i just(5 minutes ago) replaced the fan in my Sparkle 300-60GRE PSU.

The fan made a bit of a clickety noise that was audible within a foot or 2... I've replaced it with a panflo... how nice...

This was the 1t PSU I've taken apart that was actually easy to do so.. no hassle.. what's more is it looks like it had ajustments for each voltage rail.. might come in handy.

Not bad for a $25 PSU

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Anon...?

s i l e n t p c r e v i e w . c o m

site down for scheduled maintenance - please try again later

:)

I already checked there yesterday and the CNPS7000-AlCu was at the top of their list.

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Anon...?
s i l e n t p c r e v i e w . c o m

site down for scheduled maintenance - please try again later

:)

I already checked there yesterday and the CNPS7000-AlCu was at the top of their list.

SPCR.com is up. :) Yep, I think that 7000-Zalman must be a very good choice. For 6000-series Cu-only they give 5+ compared to 7000 8+. And as I think my 6000AlCu is a very good cooler (and very quiet in silent mode too), CNPS7000-AlCu should be very, very good.

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I recently went on this quest for a Silent PC. There are a few Passive heatsinks for your CPU a couple are quite heavy but there’s one that's liter that uses Heatpipes and Aluminum. I found that after I silenced my Hard Drives and fans there was this very annoying whine it was from my Video Card I went Passive. I got my system Silent, however after a few minutes the Power Supply's fan had to speed up to deal with the extra heat there went my Silent PC it's still pretty quiet. :D

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I have an A7V600, CNPS7000A-Cu running and its real nice. Room temp 28'C, Motherboard 37'C and CPU (2500+) Max load @ 41'C. The only bad thing is my 9cm fan on the Zalman heatsink is a bit "shakey" at max speed. Its quieter than my HDDs (7 of them) at 2000rpm (sort of 8V). Go for it :P

The weight is not really a problem unless you are going to move your computer around.

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