armresl

Data Recovery

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Hi,

I am new here and found this site through a google search on the new pci x motherboards.

Upon looking at just the first page of topics when I logged in, I noticed several hard drive problem topics. Data recovery is what my company does and if anyone on the board has a problem and needs a company to help out I will be more than happy to not only help. I will attempt to recover your data for a fraction of what you may expect to pay.

The reason that I posted it here in this forum is because I know that there are HD problems everyday and most ppl can't afford to send it off to a clean room or spend hundreds of dollars on a recovery. We have 40 different data recovery programs as well as pc's set up to recover in DOS and Linux as well as OS.

If I can be of any help to any of you guys please feel free to email me at u12armresl@excite.com and put data recovery - storage review in the subject.

Thanks

Darren

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Though the above may sound like an advertisement, I recommend you write to Darren if you do have a problem with your drive.

In another thread I lashed out at Maxtor for basically telling us to jump in the lake after my husband's 120 Gb 18 month old hard drive failed without a warning as older drives tended to (the so-called soft errors.) He freaked out as that drive contained 5 years worth of informnation, projects and other stuff that had just been stored on it from a collection of several other older drives as a backup.

He wrote to the email address in the post above and Darren gave him some good advice that actually worked, completely free of charge! We have been able to recover all the data before the Maxtor drive finally died.

So, write to him if you have a problem... It doesn't cost anything to write.

Needless to say perhaps, but I am giving Maxtor a big miss for my next drive purchases and advise everyone that considers getting new drives to go with the newer technology if your computer can handle it of SATA at 10,000 or 15,000 RPM or if not, to go SCSI.

EIDE is notoriously unreliable. The army would not touch it, so why should we?

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In another thread I lashed out at Maxtor for basically telling us to jump in the lake after my husband's 120 Gb 18 month old hard drive failed without a warning as older drives tended to (the so-called soft errors.)
Did they refuse to replace the drive? If you were expecting them to even remotely consider paying for data recovery, you will never find that offer from any drive manufacturer.
He wrote to the email address in the post above and Darren gave him some good advice that actually worked, completely free of charge! We have been able to recover all the data before the Maxtor drive finally died.
Glad to hear you were able to recover your data. Be sure to back it up now that you almost learned the hard way though. :)
Needless to say perhaps, but I am giving Maxtor a big miss for my next drive purchases and advise everyone that considers getting new drives to go with the newer technology if your computer can handle it of SATA at 10,000 or 15,000 RPM or if not, to go SCSI.

EIDE is notoriously unreliable. The army would not touch it, so why should we?

Because IDE hard drives are generally reliable enough, and cost about $0.50/MB if you shop around, whereas SCSI drives are typically 5-10 times that cost (usually closer to 10). Western Digital Raptors (the only 10KRPM SATA drive that isn't really a SCSI drive with a new connector) are far from cheap themselves. SCSI drives are certainly more reliable in general, and I prefer them for storing important data, but IDE drives don't exactly drop like flies. RAID and backups can do wonders at a lower cost. Almost all systems that I sell to people now use IDE RAID1 (since you can recommend regular backups all day long and it never seems to happen...Not that I have been a perfect angel about this myself).

At the end of the day, IDE just works well enough for most people and is incredibly cheap.

BTW, the Army uses IDE drives in most of their workstations, which are just conventional Compaq/Dell (etc.) systems. There are a few field computers that use hard drives like the notoriously crappy IFSAS, but in my opinion they are morons to use any kind of spinning platter hard drive in a field computer. SCSI drives still die if you drop them or bang them around.

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He freaked out as that drive contained 5 years worth of informnation, projects and other stuff

If it's important, you've got backups.

advise everyone that considers getting new drives to go with the newer technology if your computer can handle it of SATA at 10,000 or 15,000 RPM or if not, to go SCSI

15k SATA? ME WANT!!!

EIDE is notoriously unreliable. The army would not touch it, so why should we?

You're either ignorant or a troll. Which one is it?

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I really don't have anything to add after Sivar and HMTK already posted. :) I just wanted to mention that I have never had a drive die yet, be it SCSI or IDE or even that one ancient ESDI (or was it RLL?), back in 1986. As a population, drives really are quite reliable mechanical devices. That isn't to say their infallible. Far from it. However, considering how many are out in the field (I think something like 50 million units per quarter for the industry as a whole), it's not as if they're dropping en masse.

As a consumer, though, I understand the frustration involved when a drive fails. I sympathize with anyone that has to do go through it. I'm happy that you were able to get your data back, though. You'd think folks working at a drive company would know better and regularly do backups, but I had a coworker that "assumed" his local drive would never die (!). It died one day and took 2 years of his work with it; data recovery couldn't do a thing. :(

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I had one drive that was a little touchy after 2 years of constant 24-7 use (i was so happy with my machine and the fact i never had to restart it), and 1 1/2 years of being nearly full. It is still in use today 4 years since purchase (1 year of completely not being used). So i do not ofr one second think they are dropping like flies.

Second i think it is is a big advertisement, if the story is true i am sorry about your troubles but 2 people coming in and selling one business that is that UBER but you can't even mention the name of the company and gives us a free email adress seems fishy. Then again i am Pariniod of everything. Basically all i am saying is becareful.

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Hi

Since 1995 I have had 3 hard drives die under me, the first was a 1.6Gb WD one day OK the next day on start up, dead. That cost me 6 months work and I knew from then on I would "BackUp" right, wrong. By the time the next drive went, a 8Gb Quantum almost a years worth of work went with it. I had forgot to test that the backup would in fact work when needed, it did not! :o

Now the last drive to die on me, a 40Gb Maxtor was 2 and a bit years old. It made a few clanks and then went to Hard Drive Hell. But this time I was ready. I even had a spare 80Gb Maxtor Plus 9 so was saved a trip to the local computer store. Everything was backed up to DVD and the server, so within a few hours the computer was fully back to life. :)

Backup, make sure the backup works and keep a spare drive ready.

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I am not one to say drives never die i just wasn't a big fan of the IDE is crap statement that was made. Just a few thing bug me the 5 years worth of work. 5 years for a hard drive is a long time IMHO. And if it was copied at some point from another time then that means there should of been a backup at that point. Losing alot of work instead of it all is definately better. And nothing is ever better then backing up your information. Don't let yourself find put the hardway. Trust me it will be the only time in your life when it really matters that your data will up and disapear. I really think any person useing their computer for bussiness should back up that info with every change.

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Though the above may sound like an advertisement, I recommend you write to Darren if you do have a problem with your drive.

In another thread I lashed out at Maxtor for basically telling us to jump in the lake after my husband's 120 Gb 18 month old hard drive failed without a warning as older drives tended to (the so-called soft errors.) He freaked out as that drive contained 5 years worth of informnation, projects and other stuff that had just been stored on it from a collection of several other older drives as a backup.

He wrote to the email address in the post above and Darren gave him some good advice that actually worked, completely free of charge! We have been able to recover all the data before the Maxtor drive finally died.

So, write to him if you have a problem... It doesn't cost anything to write.

Needless to say perhaps, but I am giving Maxtor a big miss for my next drive purchases and advise everyone that considers getting new drives to go with the newer technology if your computer can handle it of SATA at 10,000 or 15,000 RPM or if not, to go SCSI.

EIDE is notoriously unreliable. The army would not touch it, so why should we?

Any important information should ALWAYS be backed up, and the backups should be tested and ensured up to date.

AFAIK SATA 15000 RPM does not exist yet. Just because there are less 'consumers' at home running off SCSIs doesn't make them any more reliable. A hard drive is a hard drive and is prone to failure. The most cost effective solution is to BACK UP.

Everyone's had problems with different brands; as far as I'm concerned I label Maxtor my best brand after using:-

1. Seagates that start 'clicking' do death where their head just keeps spinning up and down.

2. WD's with PCBs that eventually covered half of my computer in smoke.

3. Most worrying of all, the IBM Deskstar 75GXP series which other members here can write whole books about.

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