blakerwry

Why Are People Buying S-ata?

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I'm just wondering what is prompting people to buy S-ATA gear.

I feel that P-ATA is more compatible and less prone to trouble, most S-ATA gear being new and hardware, drivers, and cabling/connectors are still getting the kinks worked out.

Additionally, most of the performance of S-ATA gear is equal to PATA, but S-ATA products seem to carry a slight premium, what's pushing the market?

And why not stick with the mature technology?

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I'm still buying mostly PATA gear. I was looking forward to the new cables, but the terrible connectors SATA uses have pretty much ruined that for me.

I've also noted that, on most products, the premium seems to be about a full capacity grade.

A media server I'm building is probably going to have to use 4 SATA drives. I'm cramming 8 drives into it and the mobo has 2 PATA connectors and 4 SATA. I didn't want to bother with a controller card. If you're planning to use a lot of drives the cabling is certainly an advantage in the airflow department if you don't want to use SCSI disks. The SATA connectors are so flimsy though you have be very careful when you're working in the case. A solid tug can snap them right off. I think the mechanical aspects of the specification were given too little attention. Hopefully SATA II will fix this.

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I have to agree with you both here. The performance is, to me, the same, and the SATA mainboard connectors are a "snapped connector waiting to happen", if your the type that has to fiddle around in your case now and then. Aside from the width of the connectors themselves, PATA/IDE cables now come sleeved with most mainboards, and rounded IDE cables are everywhere.

I guess the only advantage would be hot plugging, but that is reserved for native chipset controllers I believe.

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I tried hot plugging with a cheapo silicon image controller card, it worked without a hitch... I would assume that hot plugging will work with any controller (unless someone knows otherwise)... Its a base feature of SATA, just the drivers need to support it.

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I haven't bought any S-ATA devices yet, and the most recent ATA device I

have purchased is my DVD burner.

I'm also waiting a few more months to upgrade my system, hoping that a

few newer motherboard designs will come out to see how they apply the

latest technologies in the second round of release.

My 2 cents:

P-ATA is a more mature technology, so mature that we already know

(and are hitting) many of the limitations in its design.

Compatibility is limited to within a couple of generations (I have older drives

that my system will not boot with alongside my newer drives), and we still find

significant performance/quality differences in using "common" cables

(round vs straight, ATA-66 vs 100/133) and adapters (SIIG, Promise, Highpoint?, etc.)

The performance of S-ATA (in general) is equal to P-ATA (or even potientially slower thru the use of bridging connectors), but future S-ATA implementations

offer performance features that are not as easy to backfit into the P-ATA specs;

or are built in as a kludge that leads to proprietary implementations from specific

companies that want to be first to market with a solution.

S-ATA provides an incentive for introducing more advanced technology,

10k rpm drives, better RAID setups.

S-ATA is an interesting stopgap for those who are really looking forward to

Serial attached SCSI.

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I used a SIIG and Promise. I didn't attempt it, but both manuals claimed hot plugging was not supported. Dunno why.

I only attempted it, because I had an external drive tray to test it with... I wouldnt want to try it 'manually' - ie pulling cables outa the drive, while running...

Windows XP was really good about it... Find the drive, a few seconds after it was powered back up, and remove it as the drive was powered down... No squaking about it... Athlough to be fair, the drive was empty, so if something went looking for the drive, thier may have been squaking at that point...

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i use sata because i wanted a WD raptor. Its fast.

No driver issues, xpsp1 installed just fine with nothing special.

The cable connectors do seem kinda flimsy, but i dont plan on fooling with them much.

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most of the performance of S-ATA gear is equal to PATA

When I read the above statement, I'm thinking sure...

If you compare a single drive to a single drive.

But most of us use more than one drive.

So what might be an interesting comparison in regards to performance is isolating the difference the serial part makes.

So hook up a 'standard' two disk setup

1) OS/Apps

2) Swap, Data

And compare the performance between PATA and SATA.

And since we are in dream of a benchmark testing for someone else to do land,

maybe even start with a single drive versus two drive setup comparison.

My reasons for buying a SATA drive would be (in order)

A) it came with the laptop

B) it is a raptor

C) my new motherboard came with nice sata connectors and I'm itching to try them because I like the slimmer cables.

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I don't have anything SATA yet but my next disk will be SATA. Why? Cable clutter, upgradeability. The technology is mature enough for me. Biggest difference is the physical interface.

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SATA does not seem to me worth the premium unless it's for hot-swapping. On a somewhat unrelated note, I just changed out my 1-year-old WD1800JB for a 74gb Raptor and feel no performance gain whatsoever... Win2K boots a few seconds faster--that's about it

*edit Sept 2010*

Boy was I wrong about that. We saw the road, we saw it rising, we saw it rising off into infinity. And still we flinched. Now Jackie was a hayseed, but he knew his "purview" if you will. He knew how to milk a goat, he knew the primordial essence of things. God doesn't take kindly to such "gaucherie." Eighteen tons of cocaine moved and several paternity suits later, I'm still grasping for the "nards." Aye, brother, there's no rest for the exceptionally turgid, wicked ones.

Edited by housewares

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I started buying SATA disks in my datacenter at work. SCSI is just ridiculous $/GB these days and, although I still need SCSI for the absolute highest performance applications, the WD Raptor is a very fast disk and suffices in all other locations. With the 3Ware SATA controllers I get 12 SATA ports per PCI-X slot and the mainboards I've been using have 4 SATA ports as well. I have no driver problems with the 3Ware because they are identical to the 3Ware PATA controller cards as far as the host is concerned. We're talking $550 for 12 ports which is comparable to PCI-X u320 adapters.

Supermicro offers chassis with hot-swap SATA bays and backplanes. I think these are great. I expect to take delivery of one this week in fact, and I'm going to jam 4x74GB Raptors and 4x400GB Hitachi disks in that sucker. With PATA I wouldn't have this nice hotswap case and I'd have a lot more cable clutter. I don't ever want to see a host with 16 PATA ports, thanks.

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Other than the speed-bump to 300MB/s, does S-ATA 2 offer any other advantages? I've heard people saying they won't buy S-ATA because they're waiting for the next revision. If there're no additional benefits in the new specification, why wait? I'd imagine we need to go through another 3 or maybe 4 generations of drives before we max-out the 150MB/s interface.

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Supermicro offers chassis with hot-swap SATA bays and backplanes.  I think these are great.  I expect to take delivery of one this week in fact, and I'm going to jam 4x74GB Raptors and 4x400GB Hitachi disks in that sucker.

We have six of these Supermicro SATA dual-Xeon chassis with hot swap trays and they are great performers and have been running rock solid stable. Awesome bang for the buck.

They just came out with a P4 version as well which would make a killer workstation.

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I can't believe that there aren't more positive replies, here....I have been running 2x 36G Raptors since January...and am very happy with them. Believe it or not, they are faster in RAID 0 that the 2 Maxtor Atlas 10K IIIs I had running RAID 0 on a MegaRAID Express 500 RAID Card...and since my Asus A7N8X-Del came with the SATA +RAID onboard, I figure I am way ahead (the MegaRAID express 500 is around $160 used, right now!!!).

I have had NO stability issues...I am running a Barton 3000+ at 2300Mhz (11.5 Mult @ 200 FSB)...and am very happy with the whole setup.

Thanks,

Kelin :P

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Believe it or not, they are faster in RAID 0 that the 2 Maxtor Atlas 10K IIIs I had running RAID 0 on a MegaRAID Express 500 RAID Card

They should be. And you do not need a MegaRAID Express 500 RAID Card to run U160 or U320 drives in raid 0.

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ANyone hae any opinions on why the raptor is a P-ATA drive that is only offered in a S-ATA interface?

It certainly does not max out the UDMA mode 5 P-ATA interface... it doesnt seem to actually support any advanced features of S-ATA over P-ATA... except for possibly hot swap, which is supported in P-ATA under some controllers with a hot swap drive cage.

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ANyone hae any opinions on why the raptor is a P-ATA drive that is only offered in a S-ATA interface?

I'd agree that it's rather strange to have (what is marketed as) an Enterprise-class drive designed around an age-old desktop interface. I think this is just WD marketing-speak: after all, they have no 10k S-ATA competition just yet so they can jazz-up the image of their drive at their leisure. I don't think you could consider such a drive "enterprise-class" even if it has the performance & warranty to match - or am I on my own with this one?

I'm looking forward to other manufacturers entering the fray with 10K (native) S-ATA drives of their own, but we may be waiting a while.....

B'Billy

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Me too.

The only reason I got SATA is Raptor.

But really hate the SATA controllers and would like to make my

36G Raptor into PATA.

I heard Raptor is PATA drive and there adapters which can make the drive

PATA, does anyone know more about this?

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I can't believe that there aren't more positive replies, here....I have been running 2x 36G Raptors since January...and am very happy with them. Believe it or not, they are faster in RAID 0 that the 2 Maxtor Atlas 10K IIIs I had running RAID 0 on a MegaRAID Express 500 RAID Card...and since my Asus A7N8X-Del came with the SATA +RAID onboard, I figure I am way ahead (the MegaRAID express 500 is around $160 used, right now!!!).

I have had NO stability issues...I am running a Barton 3000+ at 2300Mhz (11.5 Mult @ 200 FSB)...and am very happy with the whole setup.

Thanks,

Kelin  :P

Good for you, Iam glad that you've gotten everything outa your system that you've expected. I think part of SATA's problems are overly optomistic marketing, that causes customers to be disappointed when they get thier rig up and running.

Iam personally waiting for sata 2.0 to come down the pike before I buy into sata, as the connector will be different, I dont want to be stuck with incompatable drives.

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Why SATA?

How many PCI-X PATA controllers are available on the market?

How many even at 64bit 66MHz? (3Ware!)

You want to build a workstation requiring multiple independent HDD channels, are you going to throw them all on the 33MHz PCI bus along with all your other peripherals?

I was faced with a choice of SATA or SCSI. I could not afford the SCSI solutions available, and for less than half the money am satisfied with SATA (so far).

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