schmoe123

Recertified Cheetah 15k.3

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Hi,

I was wondering if anyone has any good/bad experiences with recertified/refurbished Cheetah 15k.3's. The newsgroups nor the forums here at Storagereview seem to have many comments regarding experiences with these refurbished drives. My trusty old 9GB IBM 9LZX died on me after 5 years of usage and I need to find a new scsi drive for my digital audio workstation and the refurbs seem to be rather cheap compared to the new ones. By the way, is there a difference between refurbs and recertified or are they the same thing?

Thanks!

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I have a new one and a refurbed one (bought the refurbed one from a user who had received it as an RMA).

Both are working fine.

These are X15-36LPs, not 15k.3s, but still segate.

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If properly recertified, these drives should be as good as new drives.

I would watch how much warranty that you get. The longer the warranty, the greater the confidence that the drive has been properly refurbished. Ninety days is pretty standard; a year is stellar.

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mine aren't refurbs, but many of the drives i've used in the past were (10k cheetahs) and i've never had a single problem.

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In terms of experience with refurbs/recerts,

I haven't used refurbished hard drives personally, but I have a lot of faith in general in such equipment. I am typing this on an Hitachi Superscan Elite 21. It has been my monitor since I bought it, refurbished, more than 6 years ago (I think). It only had a 90 day warranty :D.

Especially with SCSI equipment, I would be inclined to trust refurbs. Every SCSI drive I've bought over the last nine years is still running. Anecdotal that is, but SCSI drives are designed to be very reliable, and most have tons of life in them. The refurbs should be no different.

Seperately,

is there a difference between refurbs and recertified or are they the same thing?

There is a difference. In general recertified equipment is equipment that was returned because the original purchaser found it to be defective. It was tested by the distributor and determined not to be, so it is resold as 'recertified,'

Normally, refurbished equipment is equipment that ends up being returned to the manufacturer because it was, certainly, defective. It is repaired and retested at the factory of the manufacturer and then redistributed. It is tested to the same standards as new equipment (it must pass all the same tests). Despite this it will usually feature a lower warranty.

With hard drives, some disks may get RMAed back to the manufacturer without being defective depending on how the purchaser chooses to exercise their warranty rights. You can send it straight to Western Digital, instead of Tigerdirect for example. These are labelled refurbs, when they might actually be recerts (although they're tested by the manufacturer so maybe they are refurbs:blink:. There is a thread in the forum archives which explored the cost of reburbishing disks and concluded that it was more expensive than making a new one, so maybe all hard drive 'refurbs' are actually 'recerts.' I believe MaxtorStorage was involved (to narrow a search). With hard disks it may just be a matter of who tests the drive. If the distributor tests it it's a recert, if the actual manufacturer does it's a refurb.

In general I would trust a refurb more than a recert. The refurb has gone back to the factory and been tested to the original manufacturer's specifications.

Do well.

Jonathan Guilbault.

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I used to know a fellow who worked on the assembly line at Seagate's integration factory in Oklahoma City. Based on the stories he told of how failed, but new, devices were repaired by hand and sent out as new, I'd be inclined to trust a refurbished device just as much as a new one.

Also I agree with the upthread poster. I have piles of failed Hitachis and Fujitsus, but not a single failed Seagate SCSI drive.

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Thanks for all the replies guys. I was looking at the 73GB Recertified 15k.3 at Hypermicro. It seems like quite the steal at $199 compared to a new one at $560. I guess the price difference seems so damn large I was wondering if I was gonna be throwing my money away on something that had a high probability of failure and would end up buying a new one anyway, but it looks like it might be worth that risk to save $360 over a new one. I'm just hoping I won't have any problems with the 80-68 pin adapter. Any of you guys using these 80 pin drives with a 80 to 68 pin adapter??...

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SCSI drives is built on proven technology. Defect and error handling are much more forgiving than the IDE counterpart. if you are buying refurb, keep an eye on the bad sector, use a good scsi diagnostic program to check the bad sector "grown list" frequently and scan for bad sectors frequently using windows(if using windows) chkdsk utilities. Its good to have 1 year warranty on that refurb cheetah.

Also You really need cooling on hot drive. I have a cheetah refurb 9G 10k i bought 4 years ago. and its still running and its still very quiet. This drive runs pretty hot so I installed a fan in front to cool it. my friend who also bought this drive didnt do the cooling thing and his drive is getting very noise and slow. i am amazed his drive can still load windows and his data is still "retreivable" :)

AS to the 80pin -68pin adapter, you can use such adapter on SCA drive, although not recommend by drive manufacturer. SCSI U160/320 needs a very good quality cable + active terminators on both ends (scsi host adapter provides built-in one)in order to work properly. I get away with no terminator connecting a max of 2 10k on a single cable running ultrascsi(40M/s) mode but windows event log always reports "controller error".

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o also that cheetah has 4 platter/disc. so it will run hot and may give out high pitch noise.

Hardly. I have to put my ear up to my 10k.6s to hear the high-pitched noise; the 15k.3 is much quieter (ball versus fluid bearings).

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Still, if c't mag measures a non-trivial idle noise level with the 73 gig 15K.3 (2.0 sone on beta, 2.1 sone on retail), I'll believe that. According to the noise specs, the 36 and 18 gigs should be much quieter, no noisier than a Cheetah 36ES which is certainly desktop compatible. (That's quite plausible, given Fujitsu's MAS shows something similar - 73 gig 2.1 sone, 36 gig 1.3 sone.)

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I got one of these. The SCSI BIOS string reads CSC 73GB 15k REFURBISHED on bootup, and idle noise of my sample is a lot louder than my single platter 18GB 15k.3. Subjectively it is as loud as a single-platter ball-bearing Fujitsu MAM, though with a much more pleasant lower pitch hum. Lot quieter than a 36Z15, and it came with a free U320 capable 68pin adapter too. Up to you if the extra noise and lesser warranty over a 74GB Raptor is worth it or not.

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I got one of these.  The SCSI BIOS string reads CSC 73GB 15k REFURBISHED on bootup, and idle noise of my sample is a lot louder than my single platter 18GB 15k.3.  Subjectively it is as loud as a single-platter ball-bearing Fujitsu MAM, though with a much more pleasant lower pitch hum.  Lot quieter than a 36Z15, and it came with a free U320 capable 68pin adapter too.  Up to you if the extra noise and lesser warranty over a 74GB Raptor is worth it or not.

interesting BIOS string.

it will remind the buyer that its a REFURB not NEW scsi hdd on every boot.yikes.

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I have 4 36GB 15K.3 SCSI drives in my system (all brand new when I bought them though) and I've had the chance to compare the noise levels of two of these and two Raptor WD740 74GB drives in my sysstem - and the funny thing is that the noise level fo the 15K.3 was just as silent as the noise level of the Raptor 74GB - though stats states otherwise.

I really testet the noise level thoroughly and I could not hear any difference in the noise level between the SATA FDB drive end the SCSI FDB drive at all.

I'm very pleased with my 4 15K.3 drives - and would only trade them for 4 faster and more silent running SCSI drives.

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