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Linux Image Editing Software Suggestions?

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Hi folks,

Is there professional image editing software that runs on Linux with at least the capability of Photoshop, including the ability to open/save PS files?

Suggestions?

Thanks!

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As Occupant said, The GIMP, or GNU Image ManiPulator (obviously not named by the marketing department) is the best image editing software for Linux, period. While most applications have many viable alternatives, seriously, don't even bother with anything else.

Several professional artists that I have spoken with have indicated in the past (1999-2001) that they would probably switch to The GIMP if it supported CMYK color (rather than just RGB, indexed, etc.)

Your timing is interesting, because version 2.0 was just released like two days ago, after several years of development. It now supports CMYK color.

I was never personally a big fan of the thing, because I couldn't stand its interface. Not that Photoshop's interface is very good, but I am used to it. The GIMP 2.0 reportedly has a completely redesigned interface, but I have not yet tried 2.0.

You can get more information from http://www.gimp.org/

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CMYK was long touted as a "wait for the next release, it will be great" feature, and at least one release announcement that I read mentioned that it supported CMYK color. I am installing it now to find out.

It would be a terrible mistake on their part, IMO, to not support CMYK.

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Thanks - but no, without it CMYK won't work for me. It does not look like it supports LAB or HSV, either.

Sort of like Redmond Bill, Adobe (and Macromedia/Allaire, too) still seem to have me stuck - I hate 'em, and hate giving more and more $ to them for less and less back, but the reason they get away with it is they own the town....

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As Big Buck Hunter suggested, you should simply run PS under WINE. I've done it. It works. If you have trouble doing it the old fashioned WINE way, you can try this method.

If you're worried about support, Codeweavers Crossover Office will is a guaranteed way to run PS under Linux. Some production studios at Disney are running PS this way.

Do well.

Jonathan Guilbault.

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The GIMP is tremendously full-featured.

I think you may be doomed to wait until it is enhanced further. The development of GIMP is very consistent --it will improve further. Unfortunately this is of little use to you.

I searched for sometime for an alternative to PS to use in Linux. I do a great deal of photo editing and have been slowly moving away from Windows. My conclusion was that there is no alternative to PS. Most of my tools, like NeatImage for example, worked under Linux in my experimentations.

I know this isn't what you want to hear, but I wandered the 'net for a couple months and found nothing.

Do well.

Jonathan Guilbault.

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Another possible option besides gimp is the spin off cinepaint. More targeted for the film industry, cinepaint supports a more extensive set of image formats. The Gimp project isn't very sensitive to the needs of their 'high end' users unfortunately, and they aren't interested in incorporating patches for those items either.

Gimp really bogs down with anything over about 50MB and we regularly work on 350-500MB files. Gimp doesn't support high dynamic range or even 16bit images very well. Even Photoshop7's support for 16bit is poor. And color management in Gimp is nonexistent. (bummer for me) Pantone colors would be nice too.

Now, you mentioned you need CMYK support, out of curiosity... why? If you are using a windows box to control your printing system, I believe you will find, upon detailed research, that windows *always* converts print out put to RGB space before it sends it out over the wire. Most printing RIP systems actually convert to RGB internally before they compute the final gammas for each of it's target inks. So unless you are using a kodak medium format digital back with direct CMYK output (or better), Mac OS, and a really awesome printing system (Heidelberg perhaps? aka a CMYK RIP); in other words, a CMYK work flow, I'm not sure why you would want CMYK in your graphic editor.

But, even more puzzling, why didn't you ask about CMS support? Without color management, I really can't think of any reason to bother with CMYK, even with a CMYK work flow.

Sorry for being nosy but I really love color and all it's intricacies and beauty.

p.s.

Oooh, I just checked the latest gimp 1.3 and it is linked against liblcms1, so maybe they do have or are at least working on color management... interesting.

PS7 doesn't support HSV either. I need to get PS8. -- Eeew yucky, they have an activation system like Quark now. stupid. You know, I actually own a copy of quark express, but we haven't bothered to reactivate it after upgrading the os on that machine. Its kind of amazing that we have a thousand dollars sitting around idle because *I* can't get myself to call them up on the phone *again* to reactivate it. I really don't like activation systems. Humm, maybe you are right, adobe is going in an evil direction... Weren't they the ones that got that Russian cryptographer thrown in jail for discovering a bogus encryption method, even more infamous because it was adobe that was the one being ripped off... stupid.

long live open source

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Weren't they the ones that got that Russian cryptographer thrown in jail for discovering a bogus encryption method, even more infamous because it was adobe that was the one being ripped off... stupid.

His name was Dmitry Sklyarov, and he was arrested for breaking everybody's favorite law (DMCA) which allows companies to sue when flaws in their products are discovered, rather than fix them. Wired has a story about the Adobe case.

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Now, you mentioned you need CMYK support, out of curiosity... why?  If you are using a windows box to control your printing system, I believe you will find, upon detailed research, that windows *always* converts print out put to RGB space before it sends it out over the wire.  Most printing RIP systems actually convert to RGB internally before they compute the final gammas for each of it's target inks.  So unless you are using a kodak medium format digital back with direct CMYK output (or better), Mac OS, and a really awesome printing system (Heidelberg perhaps? aka a CMYK RIP); in other words, a CMYK work flow, I'm not sure why you would want CMYK in your graphic editor.

In a scenario where there is a CMYK app and an RGB print driver, it is good to keep images in their native format while doing edits to prevent dithering. Sort of like sound studios keep everything at 24/96 till it hits the distribution medium (CD) at which point it is downsampled to 16/44.1. RGB and and 15/16bit are horrible for edits.

Another scenario that you mention is that the user has access to a RIP (used Cannons can be found for cheap nowadays) or a printer with a CMYK print driver (Tektronix phaser 840?).

Thank you for your time,

Frank Russo

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Another possible option besides gimp is the spin off cinepaint

Gimp really bogs down with anything over about 50MB and we regularly work on 350-500MB files.  Gimp doesn't support high dynamic range or even 16bit images very well.  Even Photoshop7's support for 16bit is poor.  And color management in Gimp is nonexistent.  (bummer for me)  Pantone colors would be nice too.

Thanks for the cinepaint link - all of the above applies to us.

Now, you mentioned you need CMYK support, out of curiosity... why? 
So unless you are using a kodak medium format digital back with direct CMYK output (or better), Mac OS, and a really awesome printing system (Heidelberg perhaps? aka a CMYK RIP); in other words, a CMYK work flow, I'm not sure why you would want CMYK in your graphic editor.

All that and more. Actually, for in house still shooting we run from D1X through Leaf to Sinar. But more critically, we work in and out of all manner of color spaces - for going to press, as well as because we often are handed work that originated elsewhere that we have to further manipulate to make into something else.

Probably 85% of what we touch at one time or another in its life will be touched in CMYK space. I can guarantee you that if a client hires us and a designer and a catalog is produced, then the idea is hit upon to "make it interactive" or who knows what, well, it'll be a Quark doc and it will be in CMYK. Depending on what happens to it afterward, we may just have to dip into the CMYK, or actually work in it (in that example). Usually the desire is to make as few color space changes as possible, so even if our product will be RGB, if the source is CMYK we may need to work in CMYK, those files would be print-ready for future use, then we'd drop into RGB at the end.

But, even more puzzling, why didn't you ask about CMS support?

I think I was being naive...figured it'd have to have it. Heck, I even figured at least CMYK would be there, even if other spaces were not.

--  Eeew yucky, they have an activation system like Quark now.  stupid.

Uh, yeah, this and other comments about Adobe's wonderful customer service basically is what it boils down to.

I live in (work in) an extremely customer service oriented world. Without going into all of the loveliness of Adobe and copyright issues, let us just say I HATE giving my money to companies that treat me in such a way that if I treated my customers that way I'd be out of business.

They sure don't seem grateful to have my business....

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