supercaffeinated

You've Got 7 Days To Buy Dvd X Copy

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Don't encourage anyone to buy that POS software. I can't wait for those 321 clowns to be sued back to where they come from.

If you want to back up your DVDs you use the following:

DVD Decrypter from http://www.dvddecrypter.com/ to rip the DVD <free>

Then use CloneDVD from http://www.elby.ch/en/products/clone_dvd/ to pick the options you want and burn to DVD <30 days free then $40>

A fraction of the cost and I've never burned a coaster. Compare that with the money spent on 321's stinker and the 10 coasters in 15 DVDs I tried to back up. Their software is crap and they know it - their company line is "it's new, we'll fix it" Yeah right; after days on hold with their techs I finally got them to admit their software works "most" of the time and that "nothing works all of the time" Save your money and help drive these jokers out of business.

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I don't use the software but I heard that for the new versions to work it has to call home each time the program is used.Seems to me that if that be the case a lot of folks are about to be screwed.It would also seem that the sofware could be remotely disabled which means another good screwing.Of course it's all a mute point since for the people who really want to can find free stuff to do the same thing as DVD X-Copy .

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Thanks for all the info about Dvd-x copy. I didn't know it could be remotely disabled. I tried a bunch of the free/shareware stuff back when I first got my 2.4x HP +RW burner a year or so ago. I was able to make copies, but they weren't readable in regular DVD players. Maybe I'll try again.

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Most DVDs will not fit onto DVD+R(-R) media, so archiving them is more or less not possible. I mean, you could resize the video or re-encode it into, say, divx, but that defeats the purpose of archiving.

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Most DVDs will not fit onto DVD+R(-R) media, so archiving them is more or less not possible. I mean, you could resize the video or re-encode it into, say, divx, but that defeats the purpose of archiving.

What are you tring to say here.Don't take me the wrong way I just don't understand your point.

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I've had a couple of perfectly pristine looking DVD's go bad.... that was in a playstaion though.. not a DVD video

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My friend uses DVD Decrypter and Gordian Knot I believe. I don't know the specifics of it because he usually leaves them in the native DVD format and than use Alcohol 120% to mount the ISO images of the discs to watch them. (A waste of 700+ GB, but I guess when you have that much, you really don't care.)

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Most DVDs will not fit onto DVD+R(-R) media, so archiving them is more or less not possible. I mean, you could resize the video or re-encode it into, say, divx, but that defeats the purpose of archiving.

What are you tring to say here.Don't take me the wrong way I just don't understand your point.

DVD-R/+R discs have a capacity of about 4.5GB. Most movies use dual-layer discs with a capacity of 7+GB. Sometimes the video fits, sometimes it does not. Many Anime DVDs can fit in 4.5GB, but many regular movies cannot fit even after removing unneeded audio tracks and such.

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Most DVDs will not fit onto DVD+R(-R) media, so archiving them is more or less not possible. I mean, you could resize the video or re-encode it into, say, divx, but that defeats the purpose of archiving.

What are you tring to say here.Don't take me the wrong way I just don't understand your point.

DVD-R/+R discs have a capacity of about 4.5GB. Most movies use dual-layer discs with a capacity of 7+GB. Sometimes the video fits, sometimes it does not. Many Anime DVDs can fit in 4.5GB, but many regular movies cannot fit even after removing unneeded audio tracks and such.

I suppose I was looking at it from the point of even if you have to use two disk to make a backup of everything on a double layer disk minus the CSS you would still have an archive of the orignal data.If you look at archiving as being 100% of the orignal including CSS,then I would agree it can't be done.Today :rolleyes:

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I've been using DVD Shrink for a number of weeks now, and it too performs the entire process of ripping a dvd, removing extras as necesary, and then burning it out to a dvd. But what is also does (which I'm sure others do as well) is compressed domain transcoding. Compressed domain transcoding allows you to transcode an MPEG-2 stream into a lower bitrate MPEG-2 stream, without completely decompressing then recompressing the entire thing. If a DVD still doesn't fit on a DVD-R after you've removed all the extras, you can "shrink" the main feature down to fit. A full length feature film on the highest quality settings takes maybe an hour to transcode and burn...and the quality is very good.

-Chris

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Cool, thanks Chris. I'll give dvdShrink a try. I wonder how long it'll be before the MPAA goes after them too. I suppose they'll wait until they beat 321 studios fully in court before they chase these guys.

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I use DVD Shrink as well, free and does the job. As with all of them, until dual layer recording hits us "masses", often you will often need to make decisions concerning what to keep, to compress or put on 2 disks etc. But that is the name of the game for a while yet.

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The MPAA will have a bit of trouble killing DVD Shrink(Great Software)as it's free and while it seems that one person does most of the coding ,if you have a good suggestion you can get your hands on the code you'ld like to change.If MPAA goes hunting these guys they'll just go to ground and keep putting out updates.The sad thing is that many of the programs you see on the web claiming to do what Shrink does is in fact Srink with a new face and a large price tag.

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I see a new term coming to usage in light of the MPAA, DCMA, Patriot Act, RIAA....etc.....

"Guerilla Programmers"

I think the analogy is actually rather good.

-Chris

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So what is the fastest way to use DVDShrink to backup a DVD? Can it burn while it re-sizes? I only have one drive, so I was thinking it would be fastest to first rip the DVD to hard disk and then if Shink could burn while it writes, that would be best.

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Um, 'cause blanks are about a buck.

http://www.ecost.com/ecost/shop/detail.asp?dpno=151152

DVD movies are compressed to begin with. I can see compression artifacts all over the place on commercial DVDs. DVD Shrink uses a special algorithm to simply enhance the compression ratio by additionally compressing certain parts of the DVD that can be further compressed.

To prevent piracy, commercial DVDs should simply offer substantially higher quality than I can afford to burn on my PC. That or they should invest the money in buying up every piece of software that comes out that can breach their security, just like the oil industry does when an engine comes out with crazy high mileage.

They shouldn't wine about how people are copying stuff. They should invest some money in computer professionals to secure their stuff, or to make their commercial product of a high enough quality that the average joe can't afford to reproduce it.

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so what if blanks are a buck? ok, clarifying: has anybody here ever had a dvd destroyed (especially when handling/storing properly) and had to resort to a backup?

for my money, it's not worth $1 and my time to get a worse quality version of a disc i'll probably never break.

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I think it needs to perform the compression before it begins the the burn. I think you're best route would be to rip the entire disk using dvd encrypter in file mode, and then opening that up in DVD shrink.

As for honold's questions; yes I have had DVD's begin to develop errors...particularly after having been loaned out to someone for a while :-) Better to loan out the copy and have that damaged then the original.

-Chris

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