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Ibm Gxp Fiasco Secrets Revealed !

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We'll, this seems authentic, and the details are nothing short of sensational !!!

Read a scan version of the Maximum PC article in the following PDF:

http://www.sheller.com/PDF/2004.01.09_Maximum_P1.pdf

Taken from http://www.techreport.com/ :

start quote

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The possibility of serious reliability problems with certain of IBM's GXP-series hard drives has been well documented. High failure rates may have forced IBM's decision to sell its hard drive business to Hitachi, and anecdotal evidence has been overwhelming, spawning a massive thread that will not die here at TR, as over a thousand posts have rolled in over time detailing users' experiences with drive failures, failures of replacement drives, and struggles to get IBM to honor its warranties. The fiasco led to the filing of a class-action lawsuit against IBM on behalf of GXP failure victims. However, IBM has consistently denied unusually high failure rates on its GXP drives.

Now, the law firm behind the suit, Sheller Ludwig & Badey, has updated its news page about the case (thanks Lo Yuk Fai) with a PDF version of a bombshell report from the Watchdog section of Maximum PC magazine's February issue. (Reprinted without permission?) The report is based on IBM e-mails and documents made available recently by a California court in connection with the class-action suit. The Maximum PC folks have dug up some sensational info in these documents, including internal IBM discussions revealing failure rates 10 times as high as competing products from other manufacturers, an apparent determination to address the problem through marketing denials rather than manufacturing changes, and a decision to sell a batch of faulty drives into distribution (and thus to consumers) after its rejection by a larger customer due to high failure rates. These practices seem to have raised significant concern inside IBM, based on excerpts from internal communications. A sample: "We have woven a story based upon half truths and misinformation that now places IBM in a position that is almost untenable."

In short, this is one case where the anecdotal evidence, which is all we had at the time we first reported on this story, proved to be pointing us in the right direction. IBM was quite apparently engaging in a pattern of deception and knowingly shipping faulty products to customers while hiding behind rhetoric about standard industry failure rates and the like. Obviously, IBM's decision to bail out of the hard drive business was an indicator that GXP failures were a serious problem. Now, thanks to the class-action suit, we seem to be learning the truth. Let's hope the court sees fit to punish IBM and reward consumers appropriately.

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end quote

Amazing!!!

(in my company we had to replaced ~80% of the 30GB 75GXP drives, and ~50% of the 15GB 75GXP, and 41GB 60GXP !!!)

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and a decision to sell a batch of faulty drives into distribution (and thus to consumers) after its rejection by a larger customer due to high failure rates.

Re-Pug-Nant! They should be punished severely.

We are not talking potatoes here. We are talking hard drives, the most critical element of a computer, where reliability is a must.

Sadly, I have always had the impression that manufacturers usually sell the good batches to selected customers, and the bad batches to the rest. That is why, when you buy in certain shops, you get a high percentage of defective articles, while in other shops, the percentage is much lower. Now it is confirmed with IBM.

This makes me vomit.

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Reminds me of the time I bought 20 Maxtor 98H196 model drives and was RMAing 'em back to Maxtor at a rate of two per month.

I've always considered that model to have some flaw that Maxtor won't admit to, as their suddenly denying me any further warranty on said drives suggests.

Their 100GB/160GB drives seem to be working fine though.

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I've still got two GXP drives (30GB and 45GB) in my home server. Apart from running extremely hot, they haven't exhibited any problems. They must be two years old by now, maybe older, and have taken a lot of abuse. It's only a matter of time...

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Hope they catch on fire and burn :angry:

Should be glad i didnt own any of those... had a 22GXP... died after 2 years... so i got a WD in return :)

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for laughs, search for picard's posts that contain the word '75gxp'...

LOL

I did not fail to notice in these "Secrets revealed" that included was the ide cache bug.

Still, I wonder where that batch of defective drives were shipped.

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There are also some posts by someone contemplating two 75GXPs in RAID 0.  :blink:

I used two 75GXP's in RAID 0 for years. Don't have the drives anymore, but they are still in use.

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This news is old news yet people keep buying "Hitachi"!!!

What, no one learned from the Deskstars?

Like my father always says, "Half of us are below average!"

Stick me once, shame on you. Stick me twice, shame on me.

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This news is old news yet people keep buying "Hitachi"!!!

What, no one learned from the Deskstars?

Like my father always says, "Half of us are below average!"

Stick me once, shame on you. Stick me twice, shame on me.

IBM was known for having the best disks in the industry for many years.. they had a bad model... now they are leading edge again and have, in my mind, disks that are just as reliable as the other makers...

I think overall IBM/Hitachi's track record is very good. This stick me once, stick me twice stuff is crap.

There have been other manufacturers with bad models as well, I recall very specifically a bad WD line of drives around the 1-2GB range. And just yesterday I heard about a class action lawsuit against specific older samsung drives. I think quantum also had some bad drives because of a hot chip on the PCB...

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an average represents the majority in that most people can be expected to be found around that area. as such, there is certainly not 49.5% of the population above and below.

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IBM acted as fools. If they would have stepped up to the plate and recalled all the drives and replaced them with new models they would still be in the hard drive business and have some happy customers who would continue to buy their drives.

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an average represents the majority in that most people can be expected to be found around that area.  as such, there is certainly not 49.5% of the population above and below.

The average of 1,2,3,7,8,9 is 5

Isn't it?

/casa

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The average of 1,2,3,7,8,9 is 5

yes, but in the generic statement you're dealing with the entire world's population. it is impossible that it would line out so extremely.

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yes, but in the generic statement you're dealing with the entire world's population.  it is impossible that it would line out so extremely.

Agre to that...

Thats why "median" would have been more approperiate.

/casa

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well i guess that i've adopted a connotational definition of 'median'; glancing at the definition, the statement would be correct using it instead of 'average.' there does have to a be a middle somewhere, even with a gigantic sample size.

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As mentioned, "average" as used in the original context does not divide the population into halves, like median does. For instance, the average of

1, 1, 1, 9

is 3. More than half are below average in this sample.

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