LOST6200

Dropped Hard Driver

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Holy crap, I'v done it now!. Tonight I dorpped the haard drive on my barefoot. How can I tell it it is damaged?

Thanks

B.

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If there is serious damage from a drop, you'll usually hear either bearing damage (if it's a ball-bearing drive) or a headcrash in progress. Both sound like a loud scraping/grinding noise.

Less severe damage can consist of a ding (or several) on the media. Such damage may cause the drive to die prematurely, either because the head was damaged, or because the impact caused particulates from the media to spew inside the drive, eventually lodging under the head and causing a head crash.

And if it's really light damage, or if the drive used rampload, your drive may be just fine. Since it landed on your foot (and not on a hard surface), the impulse duration was probably fairly long. Drives are more resistant to damage of a long pulse duration, so chances are the drive is just fine.

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If the drive does work, I would replace it soon. [X]

What many people don't understand is that HDDs need to be treated like they eggs, or better yet, like they're full of nitroglycerin. Even a 1" drop to a desktop surface can cause permanent damage. That damage is unlikely to manifest itself as an early failure, but will show up in increased probability of failure over time... Mishandling is the most common cause of failure in HDD field returns.

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The toes or the drive?  :P

Sorry couldn't resist

Well, I can tell by the little blood on my right foot that the ris biologoicla damage. But you should know that is not my concern. :P

Charles:

I wish I knew which drive it was or if it has the FDB. I could narrow it down to three, perhpas two. I was juggling around four drives in the removable enclosures and do not know with certainty.

Bettis

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Modern drives aren't so fragile unlike the older stuff. I've been lugging around town an 80GB Barracuda ATA in a pistol hardcase for almost a year and it still writes the disk images I dump on it as fast and reliable as ever.

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I am guessing your drive is totally fine. Dropping it on your foot as Mickey said is a relatively soft impact (although your foot probably didn't think so). Way to sacrifice your body to save a HD! You have acquitted yourself well in one of the official geek rites of passage :)

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I was juggling around four drives in the removable enclosures
Juggling drives with your feet... A crash was inevitable...:) Do you juggle other large objects with your feet? Running Chainsaws perhaps? Flaming swords? :P

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I'm afraid that if you've dropped it that it's time to Ebay the drive.

This is one reason I will never buy a used drive from eBay. <_<

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Why is everyone so literalla? I did not mean juggling like an acrobat, rahter, I interchange many drives. At 3AM, I was tooo tired and foolish to hold two drives at once. Anyway, is it likley to have sustained more than 350Gs of shock falling 30" (75cm) onto the FOot? Does the removable enclosure help?

Thanks,

Eric

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Anyway, is it likley to have sustained more than 350Gs of shock falling 30" (75cm) onto the FOot?  Does the removable enclosure help?

It isn't the amplitude of the shock so much as the impulse duration that is going to determine whether there is damage. Dropping a drive from tabletop height onto a hard surface (concrete, for example) will get you over 1,000 G's, but of a very short impulse length, something like 0.5 ms or 1 ms. I'm going to guess that falling on your foot (or any other padded surface) will give you something in the range of several milliseconds of impulse.

So to answer your question, yes, it's probably seen more than 350 G's of shock, but since shock specs also specify duration, it's hard to say if this was "too much" for the drive.

The removeable enclosure probably helped distribute the load on the drive, dissipating the impact. This will depend on the design of the enclosure, of course, plus how the enclosure landed on your foot. I'd be quite surprised if it amplified the forces.

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