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Sivar

Incorrect Wep Key

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I am using a DLink DWL-122 USB wireless card and have a 128-bit WEP key that I have entered into MacOSX's wireless config tool. I keep getting "Incorrect WEP key"

It isn't incorrect.

Latest Dlink driver (the problem was reported with older drivers), "excellent" signal strength... Any ideas?

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My WEP, in 128 bit mode, actually wants 104 bits...

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are you generating a wep key from a passphrase?

Are you entering the key in ASCII mode or the other mode (I assume binary)?

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I was typing the key in directly in hex. Anyway I just set it to use a 64-bit WEP key rather than 128. It seems to like that. Not that it really matters, WEP is about as secure as IIS anyway regardless of key size.

Now the DWL-122 USB wireless adapter is locking up the Mac after about 5 minutes of use. It's a hard lockup, requiring the 4-second power off. Mac forums say it's a "known issue" and is either D-Link's drivers, or an incompatibility with certain USB chipsets. I have to wonder if they actually tested the thing on a Mac at all before proclaming Mac compatibility. Supposedly they released new drivers to fix the problem, but the filename and website disagree with the documentation in the download itself about what version the drivers are. Very professional.

This, after the D-Link DI-624 router was DOA and had to be replaced, combined with the amateurish router config utility, makes me less than impressed by D-Link's products...

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Yeah, that looked good, but it's made by Apple, therefore costs about twice what it's worth. I'll probably mess with this a bit more, give up, and go with it. Apple may charge an arm and a lower torso, but their stuff always works like a charm.

I'd really rather get this to work though--for five minutes, it has a good signal strength through tons of furniture and a floor. One thing honold said about D-Link stuff is that it tends to connect better than a lot of other hardware. Of course, he also implied that D-Link hardware wasn't crap, so... (j/k).

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Hmm. So, I updated the drivers, sort of. The system still reports the same driver version. One thing has changed though--now it says even 64-bit WEP keys are the wrong key. :blink:

Sigh...

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ouch.

Hammer time! ow! can't touch this!

i've had good luck with D-link.. but I dont think they actually made the 704 I like so much.. or atleast I dont think they designed it... some discussion on dslreports lead me to believe that it was someone elses design which is one of the reasons for the high quality. Although D-link obviously chose the design for a reason and marketted and sold it competitively. Much better product than anything else available at the time... now days it's almost just a commodity, just goto the local computer mega store and pick up whatever router is on sale this day of the week.

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Are you adding a $ before the code? if memory serves this is necessary for 64 bit encryption. i think a # is required before 128.

3ER6GM9OXE -> $3ER6GM9OXE etc.

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D-Link tech support explicitely admitted that the DWL-122 is "flaky" and "very buggy" when used on a Mac. The admission I respect, the fact that D-Link markets it as Mac compatible, I do not. I have to wonder if it occured to them that it should probably be tested before claims of Mac compatibility are made, as this occurs on widely divergent Apple hardware.

Recap of the call:

dial...phone system options...waited 4-6 minutes for tech rep. He had no idea what I was talking about and repeated the rpoblem back to me completely inaccurately, as if trying to "make it fit" into one of a few known problems on his script. Was polite though. Asked me to wait when I explained the problems a third time, took about 8 minutes, then he said he would transfer me to level 2. Similar "think inside the box" problem with level 2 tech support, but less so. I told him that 2 other computers were working well on the network. I said I suspected it was probably flaky D-Link drivers or a hardware incompatibility with the USB chipset. He agreed in general (not to any one statement), and said "Yeah, that unit is very buggy with MacOSX. What version are you using? 10.2 or 10.3?" "10.2. 10.3 is apparantly unsupported, no?" "Yes it is unsupported. Hmm. Well, that unit can be flaky with Macs. Let me get you to pre-sales to see what they can do; a refund maybe, or replacing it with something that will work."

So, was transfered there, waited 38 minutes, got to someone who asked me for a case number (was never given one, though I had explicitely asked for one). I explained again, he said he would transfer me to his supervisor(?), then came back and said his supervisor "will hopefully call you back when he gets off the phone" (hopefully?). He didn't call back for 2 hours, so I called back, actually got to the same person, informed him I hadn't been called back, and he said he had told me I would be called tomorrow. I don't recall hearing that, but I am not sure.

So, it's a flaky piece of hardware. In addition to saying the wrong WEP key was entered (sometimes, I did get it to work once with 64-bit encryption), it also crashes the mac when unplugged from the USB port, randomely locks it up after 5-40 minutes of use, and randomely drops the connection after 15 or so minutes of no use, though it still says it is connected. Sometimes I can get it to reconnect after deleting the info that the Mac has about the wireless network and rescanning, but half the time it will randomely decide that the network is WEP encrypted (which is not the case, since I disabled WEP to get the DWL-122 to "sometimes work"), and wants a WEP key. Of course, there is no WEP key, and if there were, it would probably again say that is the wrong one.

As far as the WEP key itself, the Mac probably takes care of that. It won't let me enter anything but hex when I choose a hex key, and entering the '$' doesn't seem to have any effect when entering the key in ASCII. In any case, Dlink says it is flaky and I'll just have to wait and see what happens.

By the way, D-Link is off of my list of recommended hardware vendors. ;)

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Hi Sivar,

I'm sorry to hear about your poor experience with DLink, (I've dealt with DLink Australia on a regular basis, who were excellent in every instance that I've called them).

But I do feel your pain with suppliers. I had an experience with Netcomm and a USB ISDN modem. Took over 4 months of constant communication to get the modem to work using both B Lines (128K connection). (Single 64K line, no problem, but getting a stable 128K connection next to impossible). In the end, I thought the Netcomm techs handled it well, but an saddened that the company put out such a poor product to begin with...

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Re: Dlink support, I haven't actually been all that unhappy with it. I mean, their support is a lot better than, say, Sprint, CableOne, and god forbid Quest's "Spirit of service" :blink:

Considering how cheap D-Link stuff seems to be, I am impressed that they have 24/7 support from people that can speak English.

dude, it's a MAC!

That isn't the issue. The issue is that D-Link and their packaging and documentation says "Works with Mac OS X (v. 10.2x or Later)" and it doesn't.

  • It crashes MacOSX 100% of the time when unplugged (this is a USB DEVICE!)
  • It suddenly decides that the network is WEP when it is not and demands a key that does not exist
  • It refuses to acknowledge the validity of valid keys that do exist when the network is WEP "protected"
  • It locks up the system after 5 or more minutes of use, requiring a hard reboot
  • It claims it is connected to a network even before it finds any, and even when it is very NOT connected
  • It drops connections for no apparent reason
  • Its reported signal strength is apparently arbitrary, showing values between 33% and 100% within seconds, with no change in its environment. To top it off, the signal strength meter has nothing to do with the signal strength as reported in a percentage value. The bar could be half full and show 100% strength, it can be 80% full and show a signal strength of 45%.

In short, it SUCKS, and no company that cares about the quality or compatibility of their product would release such a POS. If they don't want to support Mac, fine, but don't say that it's supported on the packaging!

Actually, even if you ignore the bugs, the packaging also says it supports all versions of OSX 10.2 and up, but the website explicitely states that only 10.2 (not 10.3 or later) are supported.

This specific product definitely sucks, but then, many companies have at least one crappy product.

The D-Link router came with non-working wireless hardware (a rather important feature for a wireless router), but DOA happens sometimes. The replacement works, but it occasionally (every few days, far less often than the USB adapter) drops connections and refuses to re-establish a connection except for remote system reboots. It's configuration utility is very poorly put together. It is extremely flaky with any browser but MS IE6.0, which is nice considering that I had to access it from a Linux system at one point which had only Lynx. It randomely decides to ignore button presses (like "apply"). It's interface is somewhat confusing (IMO), and is missing any semblance of polish.

As far as the router, those are mostly relatively minor problems, and overall I am pretty happy with it (though I can't believe it only works with IE6--a router configuration tool isn't some random Frontpage weenie's homepage--there is no excuse for not bothering to test it with anything else).

I had a most annoying problem of specifying MAC addresses for allowed cards, and being locked out because the rules took effect immediately, before I could add any other than my server. If I had added my desktop MAC first, it would have worked, and this was mostly my fault anyway, but because of the lack of support for !IE6, I had to reset the router and reconfigure from scratch.

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Not wanting to start the next holy war or Jihad: But what's wrong with a MAC?

it was kind-of a joke. in the unlikely event that i ever bought one, i would be fine with using 3rd-party stuff like keyboards/mice/monitors/etc, but wireless networking is one area where i would be largely inclined to buy airport-only products just because of software compatibility.

as for what d-link did, it does sound wrong of them to 'support' macos x at all.

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What with the price war in consumer grade routers and networking gear, Ive found that the functionality of these devices have really been crippled.

They where forced to take the word "firewall" off the box last year, I imagine it wont be long before they're foced to take the word "router" off too. Some so called 'routers' dont even route any more, they're just sad little NAT boxes...

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They where forced to take the word "firewall" off the box last year, I imagine it wont be long before they're foced to take the word "router" off too. Some so called 'routers' dont even route any more, they're just sad little NAT boxes...

But all that comes down to what the definitions of a firewall and router are?

IMHO a firewall can only be called a firewall if it has the ability to open and close ports as required and have those defined via a ruleset, and feaures SPI.

IMHO a router can only be called a router, if static routes can be inserted into the configuration, and has the ability to support mutliple subnets. (The whole purpose of a router is to route packets between different subnets).

Which a lot of these home gateway boxes quite simply can't do...

PS. The above are simplifcations of my overall definition, which I hope everyone can understand and maybe agree with...

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I got the same wireless adapter for my parents' laptop (running WinXP Home), and I've only been able to get it to work with their router when SSID broadcasting is turned on. If SSID broadcasting is turned off, it'll only work until the laptop is turned off or put in hibernate, then it won't be able to connect to the network. I wasn't sure if it was the adapter of the router, but now I'm thinking it's the adapter.

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