Sign in to follow this  
Styler2K

What's The Best Scsi Card For Both Hd And Cd-rw?

Recommended Posts

Hey guys, I need a suggestion on which PCI SCSI card to pick up...

I'll be using it with my Yamaha CRW-F1 burner (50 pin, SCSI-2, SCSI-3) and maaaybe an older 2.1 gig hard drive (if I can find it - I know it's around here somewhere). I don't remember any specs on the drive, but I'm hoping from the size you guys can estimate its basic specs.

While on the topic, what are your opinions on running an optical device and a HD on the same SCSI channel? Any red flags?

Also, what are your opinions on those 50-68 pin converters? Reliable? Finicky?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as the the optical isn't slowing the bus down, I don't generally see an issue putting it on the same channel as a harddrive.

I have a DVD-ROM drive on a 50 to 68 converter, and except for some foo with getting termination correct, I haven't had any issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any inexpensive SCSI card would do... Unless you are planning to use a modern SCSI drive with > 40 MB/s xfer rate, an Adaptec 2940 would do just fine... even a slower one Ultra fast narow (20 MB/s) would do for both the Hd 2.1 GB and CD writer...

Also LSI logic equivalent, or Qlogic, or Initio... as long as they are supported by the OS !

MEJV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies!

I was looking at the 2940 myself because accessibility is verrry easy, and inexpensive. But there are about 6 different versions of the damn card! :lol:

Any idea as to which one specifically would suit me best?

Also, I read in a post here that if you have a dual-channel card with only one device connected, you should disable the empty channel otherwise boot-times will be delayed because the system will be looking for that other device. My question is, if you do have two devices, should you connect each to it's own channel, or both daisy-chained on one? What are the pros/cons of both scenarios?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW: I was looking at the LSI cards, especially since they come so strongly recommended here at SR. Thing is, they seem to be very difficult to come by what with my being in Canada. Either retailers here don't carry them, or US e-tailers aren't willing to ship outside the US. And the selection on eBay is not that impressive either...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My question is, if you do have two devices, should you connect each to it's own channel, or both daisy-chained on one? What are the pros/cons of both scenarios?

if you get a 2940 UW, you will have two channels, a wide and a narrow one (in memory serves me correctly, as I used to have one of these cards) and you should do exactly the same. Connect the wide drive to the wide channel and the narrow to the narrow channel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The SCSI card should have options to remove ID numbers from the seek process at boot.

So... you don't really have to disable the entire channel - you could put one device on each channel and turn off the "boot seek" for all unused SCSI IDs.

I liked using the 2940/U and same generation Tekram cards since they had 68-pin and 50-pin ports on the card. No need for adapters. But requires two cables.

DogEared

8^)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 29160 that runs 2 hd's @ 160mbyte(lvd,synch) each, then a chain of 3 optical drives, 2 of them @ 20mbyte(synch) each, 1 of them @ 10mbyte(synch).

All drives are at their maximum speeds (disk->controller, that is).

This setup performs great, and the hd performance is not at all hindered by the slower optical drives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A 2940W is 10MHz, the 2940UW 20MHz. In either case upgrade the BIOS so you boot MS CDs.

There are no problems with several devices on SCSI, unless they are 25-pin. This is Apple's SCSI-1, and often doesn't play well with real SCSI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's say we're talking about the Yamaha CRW-F1 alone (not the hard drive), do you guys think that I'll be able to get any performance advantages by purchasing a u160 card such as the 19160 or 29160 (reason I ask is because I can find both for only about $20-$30 more than the 2940...)

Just to recap, the CRW-F1 is a 44x24x44 IDE burner which I'll be using with a SC2200 coverter that was supplied with the drive. Specs for the converter are here ...

According to the site, the converter is compatible with most SCSI-2 and SCSI-3 controllers with 50 pin connectors.

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
if you get a 2940 UW, you will have two channels, a wide and a narrow one

The 2940UW is a single channel controller with 3 segments. Most models can use only two of those segments at the same time, more recent models (I think 2940UW Pro) can use all three at the same time.

A 2940UW or equivalent should be enough for your needs. Anything that costs more than €50 (cables included) doesn't seem worth it unless you get at least U2 and have plans for LVD disks in the near future. If you disk has a narrow SCSI connector, a simple 2940U suffices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The 2940UW is a single channel controller with 3 segments.  Most models can use only two of those segments at the same time, more recent models (I think 2940UW Pro) can use all three at the same time.

Hi there, thanks for your response...

I'm kinda new to SCSI, and have been using the tutorial at howstuffworks.com

(http://computer.howstuffworks.com/scsi.htm), to learn about SCSI. Thing is though, it doesn't mention anything about "segments"...

Could you maybe explain that briefly?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Let's say we're talking about the Yamaha CRW-F1 alone (not the hard drive), do you guys think that I'll be able to get any performance advantages by purchasing a u160 card such as the 19160 or 29160

No! Any Ultra SCSI HA would be fine for the thing (maybe UW if the elderly hard drive is wide SCSI - most should have been narrow SCSI stuff in those days). Things are entirely different if you plan on using a current SCSI hard drive l8r, then an U160 HA would be worth it given it's not too much more expensive (but be aware you'd need a matching U160 compatible cable with terminator then, in addition to the cabling for the burner).

Stephan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Could you maybe explain that briefly?

Thanks.

The 2940 series is a single channel SCSI card, not dual channel even though it has 3 connectors on it - one external 68-pin, one internal 68-pin, and one internal 50-pin (as I recall). All devices will share *1* SCSI channel.

When you connect a 50-pin (narrow) device to 68-pin (wide) bus (the W part of the card's name), you need to terminate, or shut off, the extra lines.

The 2940's do this for you by providing a narrow (50-pin) connector. Just plug in the appropriate cable and you are all set.

No fuss. ;)

So... each connector could be considered a "segment" of the SCSI channel, since you *could* have a cable connected to all three ports. Although you are still limited to a total cable length of 2 meters.

DogEared

8^)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this