Cavicchi

Need some advice on building a computer

Recommended Posts

So with the above configuration, I do not have a fan on the motherboard.

I just have to put a SLK -800A _ Panaflo L1A for cooling the CPU.

Am I correct so far?

Now, if I decide to chuck the Antec 380 and the rear Antec fan, I should go for Super Tornado or Super Silencer and 120 mm Panaflo L1A and use a fanmate?

Thank the good lord above, you've got it!

How do I adjust the fanmate? On screen or have to get inside the case?

See previous post.

One final note, I have the ATI 9600 Pro which does have a fan. Some people claim it's a noisy fan. I hear something coming out the back of my unit but not sure if it's the video card - sounds like mid-pitched hum. ATI does make a fanless video card the 9600 but it only supports up to 24 bit colors - I don't know if that is really an issue here. However, seems to me that a fanless video card can make things better in terms of noise.

It might make a small difference, but it's not like your 9600 Pro is a GeForce FX5800 or something. Those things are noisy. You can always try converting your 9600 Pro into a fanless unit by removing the onboard HSF and installing a Zalman HP-80 passive cooler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So with the above configuration, I do not have a fan on the motherboard.

I just have to put a SLK -800A _ Panaflo L1A for cooling the CPU.

Am I correct so far?

Hooray, I got it. :D

But it's not over yet. :lol:

The Sonata case has, I believe, 4 bays. I will use 2 for optical drives. I do not see any reason to add another HDD. So, it appears there is no problem using NoVibes if I so choose.

As to the video card, someone wanted to remove the HSF combo and replace with a Zalman cooler but said there are no mounting holes for a Zalman and the heatsink has to be glued on.

Hey, that's what he said.

I just got a reply from Mike Chin, the guy who reviewed the Sonata, at SilentPCReview and he says the Antec 380 PSU and 120 mm rear fan are not noist but do provide good cooling. He also said that modifying the PSU can be dangerous in light of the voltage and cause failure. Now, the guy who did swap the original PSU fan with a panaflo L1A has had a failure and so Mike appears to be right. For me it comes down to either replacing the PSU completely or leaving it alone. At this point I am inclined to accept Mike Chin's description of noise and see what happens. he did say there was some bearing noise in the PSU but that it was masked by the 120 mm rear fan. So, perhaps I'll leave things alone and see how it goes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i'm only skimming the thread, but is an slk heatsink really necessary? unless you're overclocking or very against the retail hsf for noise reasons, i don't see why you should spend an extra $60 to get your own hsf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i'm only skimming the thread, but is an slk heatsink really necessary?  unless you're overclocking or very against the retail hsf for noise reasons, i don't see why you should spend an extra $60 to get your own hsf.

Hi honold, yes, it is for noise reasons. I am trying to build a system that offers reasonaby fast speed and be very quiet, not silent, but quiet enough so I can concentrate on playing chess. :)

I hate to lose. :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OK, lets try and unconfuse things (on the AMD side)

As for the Thermalright SLK Heatsink (used to cool the CPU).  There is a new model SLK947U, this superseeds the 900 and 800 models and should be bought instead (it is both AMD and Intel compatible).  Price difference is negligable between all these models.

For and idea of what we are talking about look here

http://www.overclockers.co.uk/acatalog/Onl...lright_120.html

This also provides some 'reviews' and link for you to read.

As for the fan (that attaches to the Heatsink mentioned above).

Papst (sorry for the previous spelling mistake) and Vantec have a look here http://www.overclockers.co.uk/acatalog/Onl...ue_Fans_47.html

You'll find some links in there.  there are many different makes and models.  Papst & Vantec just make quiet ones.

As for Panaflo they are another maker of these 'quiet' fans and will do the job just as well, if not slightly quieter than the Vantec under standard use (ie 12V).  Buy what you can get.

The Thermaltake silent Boost would be 'instead' of the above heatsink and fan combo.  It would be a cheaper solution.  But probably not as quiet and as cool (I cannot say though as I've not read much about it as it is new to me but that review above seems very promising and I don't think you'll go wrong buying it)

For a view of it see here http://heatsinkfactory.com/cgi-bin/HFAstor...atalogno=HS-013 and review http://www.overclockercafe.com/Reviews/coo...Tt_SilentBoost/ e_dawg should be able to provide better links.

Now over to the motherboard.

By Passive hear thay mena the chip on the board anre not cooled by any fans (and is a seperate issue from the CPU & HSF information given above)

Yes get one with no fans on it for what your useing it for.

Link to the board here.

http://www.asus.com/products/mb/socketa/a7v600/overview.htm

Click on the picture of the board and you'll see a 'silver' image just to the top-right of the middle.  This normally has a fan on it, but due to a better design they don't need it.

Looks like a good board, although lacks FireWire.

Also have a look at Gigabyte version http://www.amdzone.com/articleview.cfm?ArticleID=1333

BUT Gigabyte doesn't have the mounting holes for the SLK-9xx Heatsink mention at the top of what i've just written.

Thanks for those links!

Okay, looks like I have another choice to make now. The SilentBoost is rated at 21 decibels providing 27.5 cfm and rotating at 2450 rpm. The SLK-800 has to be bought along with a fan. The fan probably should be either the Panaflo L1A or Papst. I checked the site showing the SilentBoost but all the Panaflo's there are different models than L1A - there are low output, medium output, and high output Panaflo fans. Which do I get? Where is the Panaflo L1A?

To continue, the Papst fans shown in your link are available in the UK and I am in the USA. So it remains to be seen if I can get the Pabst - which one do you recommend for my Barton 2500+?

Next, depending on the noise level of either the Papst or Panaflo, there may or may not be a case for the SilentBoost. Of course the SilentBoost eliminates the need to look for a fan but at what cost? Performance wise that is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, I'll reiterate the earlier suggestion of getting the Thermalright SLK947U heatsink ($37.99), and I recommend you put a 92mm fan on it (the Panaflo 92mm is $11). The Panaflo 92mm fan does 2850 RPM, 56.8 CFM, 35.0 dB-A when run at 12V, but a Zalman fanmate ($3.99) will effectively silence it.* This will result in the quietest possible combination of seperate heatsink & fan (the SilentBoost ($22 on pricewatch) being an unknown quantity - probably a bit noisier).

*If you're not too sure about doing this yourself, I expect your system integrator would set it to its lowest setting & check that CPU temps remain below 60ºC for you. That's all it's likely to need. You can spend hours working out the best noise to cooling ratio if you want to, of course. :)

The A7V600 & Athlon XP 2500+ is a good choice. One advantage is that there's only one model of Athlon XP 2500+ - the Barton (newest) model. Far less confusing.

The Panaflo L1A is the low output (i.e. quietest) model - if it's not listed as L1A, look for the specs: 1.3W, 3200 RPM, 24.0 Max CFM, 21.0 dB-A.

All prices from Newegg, not counting shipping (won't be too much if you order them all at once).

If you want to swap out the case fan, the 120mm Panaflo is also $11. I'd suggest a wait-and-hear attitude on the case fan and PSU, though.

If you want a passive cooler for your Radeon 9600, the Zalman ZM80A-HP is $24.99. The ZM80C-HP is presumably a newer model, but I don't know why it costs $5 more. Don't get the original ZM80-HP (no A or C) - it lacks a refinement added for the Radeon 9500 & higher.

Getting dynamat or similar for the case seems a good idea - an Akasa pax.mate kit is $14.99. You could also look at Antec noise killer fan and psu vibration dampers (under case accessories at newegg), but only if you find you need them.

A novibes will reduce HDD seek noise, but not idle whine (as will AAM - and I believe that every current IDE drive has this feature, though not all HDD utilities allow you to change the setting).

Hope this helps you to decide. All the products mentioned are my personal suggestions for you, though in some cases there are equivalent products that are just as good.

All prices from Newegg, not counting shipping (won't be too much if you order them all at once).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
First, I'll reiterate the earlier suggestion of getting the Thermalright SLK947U heatsink ($37.99), and I recommend you put a 92mm fan on it (the Panaflo 92mm is $11). The Panaflo 92mm fan does 2850 RPM, 56.8 CFM, 35.0 dB-A when run at 12V, but a Zalman fanmate ($3.99) will effectively silence it.* This will result in the quietest possible combination of seperate heatsink & fan (the SilentBoost ($22 on pricewatch) being an unknown quantity - probably a bit noisier).

*If you're not too sure about doing this yourself, I expect your system integrator would set it to its lowest setting & check that CPU temps remain below 60ºC for you. That's all it's likely to need. You can spend hours working out the best noise to cooling ratio if you want to, of course. :)

The A7V600 & Athlon XP 2500+ is a good choice. One advantage is that there's only one model of Athlon XP 2500+ - the Barton (newest) model. Far less confusing.

The Panaflo L1A is the low output (i.e. quietest) model - if it's not listed as L1A, look for the specs: 1.3W, 3200 RPM, 24.0 Max CFM, 21.0 dB-A.

All prices from Newegg, not counting shipping (won't be too much if you order them all at once).

If you want to swap out the case fan, the 120mm Panaflo is also $11. I'd suggest a wait-and-hear attitude on the case fan and PSU, though.

If you want a passive cooler for your Radeon 9600, the Zalman ZM80A-HP is $24.99. The ZM80C-HP is presumably a newer model, but I don't know why it costs $5 more. Don't get the original ZM80-HP (no A or C) - it lacks a refinement added for the Radeon 9500 & higher.

Getting dynamat or similar for the case seems a good idea - an Akasa pax.mate kit is $14.99. You could also look at Antec noise killer fan and psu vibration dampers (under case accessories at newegg), but only if you find you need them.

A novibes will reduce HDD seek noise, but not idle whine (as will AAM - and I believe that every current IDE drive has this feature, though not all HDD utilities allow you to change the setting).

Hope this helps you to decide. All the products mentioned are my personal suggestions for you, though in some cases there are equivalent products that are just as good.

All prices from Newegg, not counting shipping (won't be too much if you order them all at once).

Seems like e-dawg is very happy with his SilentBooster and that seems like a good route to take as it's all one piece. However, I believe he has a Tbred 1800+ and I plan on a Barton 2500+ and so don't really know if it makes a difference.

You suggest 92 mm fams opposed to 80 mm fans and I wonder why?

I am strongly considering the Asus A7V600 motherboard to use with the Barton 2500+. Do you still suggest 92 mm fans and why?

As to the video card, I have the Radeon 9600 Pro which has a fan. Someone wanted to replace the fan with a Zalman heatsink but discovered the 9600 Pro doesn't have mounting holes for the Zalman and the Zalman would have to be glued on. This is something I read and cannot give you more information. Any thoughts?

The noise rating for SilentBooster is 21 dba which seems a lot quiter than your Thermalright SLK947U/Panaflo combo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a general rule the larger a fan is the more air it will move for a given RPM. So were you to use a 92 mm fan instead of an 80 mm one you should be able to achieve the needed airflow running the fan at a slower speed and therefore lower noise level.

Note though that the particulars of a fans design can more than outweigh this. So a 92mm fan with an inherently noisy design may well be louder than an inherently quiet 80mm unit, even though the 80mm unit would be spinning faster.

The 92mm panoflo that spod mentioned is a quiet fan so, were you to get one of them, you’d be getting the benefit of both the larger size and the good design.

Also, manufacturers dBa ratings should be taken with a healthy pinch of salt.

Much as with bicycle weights and loudspeaker sensitivities there is a lamentable tendency for manufactures to economise on the truth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As a general rule the larger a fan is the more air it will move for a given RPM. So were you to use a 92 mm fan instead of an 80 mm one you should be able to achieve the needed airflow running the fan at a slower speed and therefore lower noise level.

Note though that the particulars of a fans design can more than outweigh this. So a 92mm fan with an inherently noisy design may well be louder than an inherently quiet 80mm unit, even though the 80mm unit would be spinning faster.

The 92mm panoflo that spod mentioned is a quiet fan so, were you to get one of them, you’d be getting the benefit of both the larger size and the good design.

Also, manufacturers dBa ratings should be taken with a healthy pinch of salt.

Much as with bicycle weights and loudspeaker sensitivities there is a lamentable tendency for manufactures to economise on the truth.

Thanks for the explanation. So now just when I thought I had it all set, here comes you two guys and makes me think about another configuration. Boy am I confused. :D

Seriously, I really appreciate all the help I can get. You guys have raised a very interesting point and I have to give it some thought. My brain is working overtime and in need of a rest. :(

But I'm getting there.

Keep it coming and my head will explode. :lol:

Just kiddding.

This is why I come here for advice - there are so many nice people here helping guys like me with limited knowledge. All you guys are really great.

Thanks!

This is one great forum and a big thank you to whoever made it possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Basically, a bigger fan can move more air with less noise. If you can use a bigger fan (as the SLK-9xx heatsinks allow you to), that would be a better choice. No question of it.

Possibly, the integrated design of the silentboost allows it to rival the "big heatsink, big fan running quietly" suggestion I outlined above. Sounds pretty good from e_dawg's testimony, and you need quietness more than cooling ability. Certainly good value. It uses the same technology as the panaflo fans (licenced perhaps?)

Note, in any comparisons, that the 35 dB(A) rating is for the fan at its maximum speed - it'll be much quieter if you use a fanmate to spin it more slowly. Also, that might be the specs for the high output fan - newegg didn't specify, but it looks like it from the part number. There might be a quieter 92mm Panaflo available.

The mounting holes (or lack of) on your Radeon could be an issue - maybe the Zalman website would help. See if theRadeon fans stand out when your system is finished - dynamat etc. could help reduce this noise anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is one great forum and a big thank you to whoever made it possible.

Donations welcome!

You'll probably be fine with either the silentboost or the SLK-947-U + Panaflo 92mm + Zalman fanmate combination. The silentboost might be simpler, the combo might be slightly cooler or quieter, but the combo would be about twice the price. (Not much compared to the $1000+ you're already spending, though). Your choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As for the 9600 Pro, it depends on your 9600pro, not all 9600pro's are equal

A look at the cooler

http://www.quietpc.com/uk/vgamb.php#zm80ahp

As for HSF -- You are probably best of with the Silentboost (you can always change it if you really don't like it)

AS for the motherboards. Pretty much all the KT600 based boards are passively cooled another one to look at is http://www.epox.org/products/mainboards/8kra2/

But the choice will come down to, Price, can you buy it and does it have everything I need on it.

Go Buy it !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is one great forum and a big thank you to whoever made it possible.

Donations welcome!

You'll probably be fine with either the silentboost or the SLK-947-U + Panaflo 92mm + Zalman fanmate combination. The silentboost might be simpler, the combo might be slightly cooler or quieter, but the combo would be about twice the price. (Not much compared to the $1000+ you're already spending, though). Your choice.

What about e-dawg's suggestion of either SLK 800/900 and Panaflo L1A? Why should I consider the SLK-947-U? Is that for AMD or P4?

That brings to mind another question which might be relevant here. According to e-dawg, the Barton 2500+ runs cooler than the P4 2.6 and thus less cooling is required = less fan noise. The SilentBoost or HSF combo is I would imagine related to the chipset. If I go for a Barton 2500+, then a SilentBoost should (I guess) do the job but perhaps need a higher setting than for what e-dawg is using (1800+). So, maybe the 92 mm fan makes sense in that regard because I could run it at the lowest setting while having to run the 80 mm Panaflo at the middle setting?

As you said, the money difference is not an issue. And the SilentBoost is so inexpensive that one could give that a first try and see how it goes. However, I am not a technically oriented person (oh, I can change a video or sound card) and so I probably would have to call someone over to change the HSF thing at a costly expense overall. So I am trying to do it right the first time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As for the 9600 Pro, it depends on your 9600pro, not all 9600pro's are equal

A look at the cooler

http://www.quietpc.com/uk/vgamb.php#zm80ahp

As for HSF -- You are probably best of with the Silentboost (you can always change it if you really don't like it)

AS for the motherboards.  Pretty much all the KT600 based boards are passively cooled another one to look at is http://www.epox.org/products/mainboards/8kra2/

But the choice will come down to, Price, can you buy it and does it have everything I need on it.

Go Buy it !

The problem is if I had to change it, I'd most likely need someone to come over the house to do it. I am having someone build this system for me - at a cost.

I can change a video or sound card and add memory, but these kind of technical things (removing & installing HSF) just make me uncertain as I have never done them.

I looked at the motherboard picture and features but don't see anything not offered by the Asus A7V600. Also, Asus might have better support for their motherboard?

I honestly don't know what that picture of the Zalman cooler is supposed to tell me. My Radeon 9600 Pro has a fan, and from what I've read, a Zalman cooler has to be glued on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What about e-dawg's suggestion of either SLK 800/900 and Panaflo L1A?

The 800 takes up to an 80mm fan, the 900 takes up to a 92mm fan, and the 947 also takes up to a 92mm fan, but has a more refined design that works a little better. The SLK-947-U is compatible with both P4 and Athlon XP CPUs.

The Panaflo L1A e_dawg mentioned is an 80mm low output panaflo. The 92mm panaflo would be better, for reasons given above.

So, maybe the 92 mm fan makes sense in that regard because I could run it at the lowest setting while having to run the 80 mm Panaflo at the middle setting?

That's the idea. Whatever you're cooling, a 92mm fan will be able to cool it just as effectively as an 80mm fan, but with less noise.

The SilentBoost or HSF combo is I would imagine related to the chipset.

Mind your nomenclature! :) * Replace 'chipset' in the above sentence with 'CPU' and you're dead on. 'Chipset' refers to the nforce 2/KT600 thingy soldered onto the motherboard, and is passively cooled on the motherboards you're considering.

*I'm not trying to be offensive, just trying to make sure you know what we're talking about, and vice versa.

Addressing your point, the silentboost (from what I gather) is very quiet and simple, and will cool your processor adequately. It might run up to 60ºC under load if you leave it in quiet mode, but that won't significantly shorten the lifetime of your CPU. Given that you've no plans to overclock and that quietness is important to you, I wouldn't try to dissuade you if you went for it.

The more traditional combination detailed above is more flexible. If you turn the fanmate right down until you can't hear the fan, it'll still cool pretty effectively. If you turn the fanmate up a little, the large fan will push enough air through the large heatsink to keep your CPU very cool for little noise. Essentially, it will cope better (with less noise overall) if you want to keep your system that bit cooler, or you want to cool a hotter CPU, but will probably cool roughly as well and as quietly as the silentboost if you turn it right down.

Sorry if I'm waffling a bit, I'm weighing the arguments as I write. Hopefully you can make out which bits are actually helpful.

I reckon that, with the sonata having pretty good airflow > cool case temps, the silentboost will cope just fine with your 2500+ at or near its minimum speed/noise setting. If you wanted to run anything hotter (e.g. the P4 2.6), I'd suggest the combo for it's better cooling ability. But for you, I'll jump of the fence (finally!) and say silentboost.

If your 9600 Pro really doesnt have heatsink mounting holes, I'd not bother putting a heatsink on that. Invest in some dynamat or pax.mate, and dampen all of the sounds coming from your PC's innards. Along with your enclosure, that should be pretty effective.

Spod

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Zalman Heatsink for the Graphics Card 'picture' was actually a link to what you would need. On there is some information about it AND links how it installs and some other probably useful links. It was to give you an idea and point you in the direction of information.

YOU need to find out if you have the HOLES. Do not take other peoples word for it, there are many different 9600Pro cards out there. Hence the links so you can SEE what we are on about.

From what I'm reading you need to get it bought sooner than later as we are going round in circle.

Epox have very good support, it was another example of a KT600 board that you maybe able to get your hands on.

So this is what I would buy (in your shoes)

AMD AthlonXP "Barton" 2500+ OEM

ASUS A7V600

Thermaltake Silentboost

Will get you started.

The case you mentioned above including the PSU. These PSU are actually pretty quiet and it is something YOU can replace if you need to. It is a couple of screws and sticking wires in the correct place, whic can only go in one place anyway.

Harddrive - cannot remeber what you decided but but Samsung or Hitachi 7K250 will be perfectly quiet.

Optical drive. These are going to be the noisest part of you computer. I cannot remeber what was decided or what you actually need.

That's pretty much it, apart from memory and the other little things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Spod

Okay, Spod, I just have one more question. You speak about adjusting the fanmate to achieve a certain temperature of the CPU. How is that accomplished? I mean, turning the knob will adjust but how do I know what the temperature is? Are you talking about a motherboard monitor that shows the temperature on the screen relative to how the fanmate is set?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup. Crude, but effective. Okay, so it's not scientific (case open=cooler air & lower than normal CPU temp readings for a given fan speed, case open/not in enclosure=will sound louder while you're testing than it will when it's all put away), but it'll give you a rough idea.

You should be able to see CPU temps from your BIOS; if not, boot into windows and run Motherboard Monitor, Asus' monitoring utility or similar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yup. Crude, but effective. Okay, so it's not scientific (case open=cooler air & lower than normal CPU temp readings for a given fan speed, case open/not in enclosure=will sound louder while you're testing than it will when it's all put away), but it'll give you a rough idea.

You should be able to see CPU temps from your BIOS; if not, boot into windows and run Motherboard Monitor, Asus' monitoring utility or similar.

Can you be more specific as to where in the BIOS I may see the temperature? I know how to get into BIOS by hitting F1 upon rebooting but need further instruction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Zalman Heatsink for the Graphics Card 'picture' was actually a link to what you would need.  On there is some information about it AND links how it installs and some other probably useful links.  It was to give you an idea and point you in the direction of information.

YOU need to find out if you have the HOLES.  Do not take other peoples word for it, there are many different 9600Pro cards out there.  Hence the links so you can SEE what we are on about.

From what I'm reading you need to get it bought sooner than later as we are going round in circle.

Epox have very good support, it was another example of a KT600 board that you maybe able to get your hands on.

So this is what I would buy (in your shoes)

AMD AthlonXP "Barton" 2500+ OEM

ASUS A7V600

Thermaltake Silentboost

Will get you started.

The case you mentioned above including the PSU.  These PSU are actually pretty quiet and it is something YOU can replace if you need to.  It is a couple of screws and sticking wires in the correct place, whic can only go in one place anyway.

Harddrive - cannot remeber what you decided but but Samsung or Hitachi 7K250 will be perfectly quiet.

Optical drive.  These are going to be the noisest part of you computer.  I cannot remeber what was decided or what you actually need.

That's pretty much it, apart from memory and the other little things.

I have decided on Samsung optical drives based on the cd-rw review on SilentPCReview. No review on the DVD -R but I tend to believe should be of same noise quality as their cd-rw.

HDD I have chosen is a Samsung.

I'm not really overly concerned about the video card because if it doesn't work out with my 9600 Pro, I can get the passively cooled 9600 (non-pro).

If given the choice, I'd prefer retail over OEM regarding the Barton 2500+

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why Retail ?

Your not using the heatsink & fan that comes with it.

You'll probably void your warrenty (3yrs as opposed to 1yr) on it not useing a recommended heatsink and fan combination and using thermal paste (as opposed to a thermal pad that would come with a recommended HSF)

save the few $$, have a beer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why Retail ?

Your not using the heatsink & fan that comes with it.

You'll probably void your warrenty (3yrs as opposed to 1yr) on it not useing a recommended heatsink and fan combination and using thermal paste (as opposed to a thermal pad that would come with a recommended HSF)

save the few $$, have a beer

I don't drink that sissy beer. :D Just gimme some nice red wine and I'm happy. :)

I guess it's the word OEM that drives me nuts. It all stems from my Compaq/Gateway experiences. I see OEM and I get MAD.

You mean I have to use paste? Elmer's Glue or Colgate's?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Possibly, the integrated design of the silentboost allows it to rival the "big heatsink, big fan running quietly" suggestion I outlined above. Sounds pretty good from e_dawg's testimony, and you need quietness more than cooling ability. Certainly good value. It uses the same technology as the panaflo fans (licenced perhaps?)

It uses different technology from the traditional (axial) Panaflo case fans. The Panaflo fan (it actually is a Panaflo fan... says right there on the label) is a unique "ring cage" design, where the sides of the fan have air vents that help reduce turbulence. I have pasted an excerpt from 7volts.com's website for your reading pleasure (themselves quoting Lemont Aircraft):

The Ring Cage

"The Augmented Fan is a new, low noise fan  technology that allows for a 40-50 % increase in flow @ equal noise levels. The Augmented Fan?s difference in operation can be observed with the  addition of a patented multiple ring structure or ringcage. The ringcage acts as a radial flow ejector in combination with an axial fan. Utilizing  the normally-wasted energy in the  fan tip vortex the Augmented Fan induces added air into the normal propeller flow. The added inflow through the rings destroys the tip vortex and helps maintain boundary layer control; the smoother flow through the system eliminates fan duct stall  and reduces noise 6 - 8 dbA."  quoted from Interesting paper at  http://home.att.net/~alemont/noise2.html

Panasonic's Application of LAC Augmented  Fan Technology (from 7volts.com):

panasrc.gif

Also see http://home.att.net/~alemont/noise1.html

7volts.com also has an excellent webpage dedicated to quiet computing techniques:

http://www.7volts.com/quiet.htm

The Tt SilentBoost is the only HSF to my knowledge that uses this unique augmented / ring cage type of fan from Panasonic. Of course, you could track down these fans and use them with other heatsinks like the Thermalright SLK-800/900/947, but I have never been able to source them in Canada. So, I did the next best thing: buy an HSF that comes with this fan!

It is my opinion that the SilentBoost virtually matches the performance of the SLK-800A + L1A and gets about 90% of the performance of the SLK-900/947 + 92 mm L1A, but at 60% of the cost. Highly recommended.

Whatever HSF setup you choose (this applies to both the SilentBoost or SLK-800/900/974 + L1A setups), I would recommend that you also do the following:

- Use a Ducting Mod and direct the intake towards the rear case fan

- Orient the rear case fan such that it blows into the case (intake, not exhaust)

- Use little neoprene pads to decouple the fan from the Ducting Mod and heatsink assembly to reduce the vibrations transmitted to the motherboard (and therefore, the case itself, as the motherboard is directly bolted to the case)

- With the SilentBoost ring cage fan, you can only use 2 screws to attach the fan to the Ducting Mod due to the fact that the fan does not have the 25 mm thick frame that you run the screws through. The alternative is you can go to a hardware store and buy 2 shorter screws and nuts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Tt SilentBoost is the only HSF to my knowledge that uses this unique augmented / ring cage type of fan from Panasonic. Of course, you could track down these fans and use them with other heatsinks like the Thermalright SLK-800/900/947, but I have never been able to source them in Canada. So, I did the next best thing: buy an HSF that comes with this fan!

It is my opinion that the SilentBoost virtually matches the performance of the SLK-800A + L1A and gets about 90% of the performance of the SLK-900/947 + 92 mm L1A, but at 60% of the cost. Highly recommended.

Whatever HSF setup you choose (this applies to both the SilentBoost or SLK-800/900/974 + L1A setups), I would recommend that you also do the following:

Can we make this simple? I am not very confident about using Ducting Mod, duct tape - yes! Ducting Mod? No.

So, I just want to cool with best situation. Forget the ducting thing and let's talk SilentBooster or HSF combo. From what has already been discussed, the SLK 800 or 900 with Panaflo L1A with fan mate is the way to go with Barton 2500+ - correct?

There is also a new version of Thermalright that is 9472 or something like that - I have the page bookmarked. Now, some have suggested a 92 mm fan but I don't know about that.

One other thing has to be addressed, someone said while the P4 2.6 runs hotter than the Barton 2500+ it dissipates heat better and so all is even in the end. Comment?

So now let's just forget Ducting Mod and focus on HSF or SilentBooster. Do you feel the SilentBooster is the way to go or SLK number ? and Panaflo L1A with fanmate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So, I just want to cool with best situation. Forget the ducting thing and let's talk SilentBooster or HSF combo. From what has already been discussed, the SLK 800 or 900 with Panaflo L1A with fan mate is the way to go with Barton 2500+ - correct?

Yep.

One other thing has to be addressed, someone said while the P4 2.6 runs hotter than the Barton 2500+ it dissipates heat better and so all is even in the end. Comment?

It may dissipate heat a little better (it comes with an integrated heat spreader), so there wouldn't be that much difference when it comes to being able to keep the CPU cool, but don't forget that the extra 10 W or so that the P4 2.6 pumps out has to go somewhere... and it ends up inside your case. What do you do with all that heat? Well, you gotta pump it out of your case using fans. But what happens when you have more heat to pump out? You need more airflow. More airflow = more noise. Still want a P4 2.6? :)

So now let's just forget Ducting Mod and focus on HSF or SilentBooster. Do you feel the SilentBooster is the way to go or SLK number ? and Panaflo L1A with fanmate?

My personal opinion is that the SilentBoost is the way to go. You sill need a Zalman Fanmate to reduce the SilentBoost's fan down to 1900 rpm, though, to make it silent.

-----------------------

If it's not too copmlicated for you, I would recommend that you decouple the fan from the heatsink using rubber grommets or neoprene/foam-rubber pads (any hardware store should carry foam-rubber pads; people usually stick them on drawers/cubpoards to stop them from banging when you shut them). All you do is undo 4 screws, take the fan off, and stick one pad on each of the 4 holes on the heatsink. Put the fan back on and put the 4 screws back on, puncturing the pads in the process. The pads will serve to isolate the vibrations of the fan from the heatsink (and

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now