Sign in to follow this  
catinthehat

This is interesting....

Recommended Posts

standard drive cache... in DOS/win 3.1 we used to use smartdrive... since win95 this has been built into the OS...

I'm not quite sure if I'd trust a Maxtor (or any other drive manufacturer's) caching program over the Microsoft one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Intel or AMD processor, 700 MHz or higher (Dual processors not supported. Hyper-Threading must be disabled.)

Hell to that.

I'm not quite sure if I'd trust a Maxtor (or any other drive manufacturer's) caching program over the Microsoft one.

catinthehat 

M$ is not on my fan list but I have to agree. M$ can probably handel their OS operations better than someone else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the website:

Frequently Asked Questions

MaxBoost Software Beta Test

How does MaxBoost work?

MaxBoost is a performance filter driver for Windows specifically designed to work on Maxtor drives. MaxBoost intelligently monitors and caches I/O requests to the drive in order to improve performance.

Doesn't Windows have its own caching scheme built in?

Yes, Windows has its own caching scheme residing at the file system level; however, MaxBoost provides performance improvements above and beyond the Windows caching scheme.

How is this different from the cache built into the drive?

MaxBoost provides a larger cache and an advanced caching algorithm that complements the cache built into the drive.

What kind of performance increase can I expect?

MaxBoost provides performance gains ranging from 2-50%. MaxBoost can be benefit performance in a wide range of applications ranging from file copying to business applications to multimedia playback. One way to measure the performance improvement provided by MaxBoost is to run the Business and High-End Disk benchmarks is the VeriTest WinBench 99 test suite. WinBench utilizes the access patterns of applications such as Microsoft Office, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Premiere to provide an accurate, real-world measure of disk performance. WinBench 99 is available for download from www.etestinglabs.com. Individual system results will vary depending upon system configuration, processor speed, available memory, drive speed, applications, and benchmarks.

MaxBoost doesn't work on my computer even though it has the required system configuration. Who should I contact for help?

Because MaxBoost is currently available as an unsupported beta, Maxtor technical support representatives, the Maxtor.com website, and the Maxtor Knowledge Base will be unable to assist you with this product. If you are experiencing any issues with MaxBoost, please send a detailed description of the issue to maxboost@maxboostbeta.com. We will use your feedback to improve future versions of MaxBoost.

Why won't MaxBoost work on my older computer with less RAM and a slower processor?

MaxBoost requires a minimum set of memory and processor resources to effectively boost disk performance. The minimum specifications necessary to ensure a consistent performance boost are a 700 MHz processor and 256MB of RAM.

Will this work on my Seagate/WD/IBM/Hitachi/Fujitsu/Samsung hard drive?

No, MaxBoost will only allow you to enable its caching scheme on Maxtor and Quantum branded hard drives; however, it can coexist peacefully with other drives. MaxBoost has not been tested with competitor's drives.

Is MaxBoost WHQL certified?

No, filter drivers are not required to be WHQL certified by Microsoft at this time.

Can MaxBoost be used with the Intel Application Accelerator or VIA Hyperion drivers?

Yes, but you should install MaxBoost after you install either of these drivers.

Is MaxBoost compatible with Hyper-Threading on Intel processors?

MaxBoost is not currently compatible with the Hyper-Threading functionality of select Intel processors. To use MaxBoost on a system with Hyper-Threading, you must disable Hyper-Threading in the system BIOS. See your system documentation for details.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still, I'd like to see an article on this. I'm gonna try it out myself, but I do not have the right software tools to benchmark correctly. All I have is HDtach and Sandra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
you can time some disk intensive tasks... copying files, unzipping large archives...

I don't think this will be able to boost STR-based tasks....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it sounds like the (in)famous Intel Application Accelerator....

only this time tweaked for maxtor drives(althought i seriously doubt about the "maxtor only" technical difficulty, i think it's a hardcoded maxtor brand check with a lot of marketing bullshit on front)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Intel or AMD processor, 700 MHz or higher (Dual processors not supported. Hyper-Threading must be disabled.)

Hell to that.

So basically they wrote OS driver-level code that is NOT RE-ENTERANT. That's why it cannot support dual-CPUs or even the appearance of such (Hyperthreading). Best practices on this type of code are that is SHOULD be re-enterant. I'm not sure I would trust such code on my system, especially where data corruption is a very possible outcome...not that I don't think it can do it's job, but because I don't trust the coding skill of the developers...

Future Shock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A rule of thumb I've gone with....don't trust hardware companies with software. Drivers are a necissary evil that is to be minimised.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd call it a cache program too as it appears to use the host memory...

I have a PIII running WinXP Pro. with 512MB of RAM, I tried to compare Winbenh results on my MaxtorDiamond Max with 16MB and with 32 MB.

Perf increase is :

- +10% using Winbench business with a 16MB cache

- +16% using Winbench business with a 32MB cache

In both cases, I have more than 50% perf. improvements using winbench high-end !!!

I don't know what they're doing but it looks like it's pretty efficient.

Even better : I had a very old 8GB Quantum BigFoot HDD. It gave me an amazing +220% perf. increase with Winbench business !!!

This could revive this old HDD for a while... :-).

Share your results...

From AnandTech Forum User Thread Here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's only one way to increase HDD performance

from the OS point of view.

And theres two main goals:

1. Serve one/few requests fast (desktop usage).

2. Serve multiple requests effective (server usage).

1. Will swing the head along the entire platter based on the

current request. This one consumes more power giving more

heat and probably shorter HDD life but a snappier feel

(specially with several HDD's doing swap/OS/app).

2. Will swing the head to the nearest request (can be in

one direction only to save more power and life, reverting in the

outer positions only). This will give the most of the HDD and

may be faster than 1. on a total view.

Today desktop usage is more HDD intensive than ever and for

one HDD systems this may be helped out using more of a 2.

approach. But I don't think Windows have required knowledge

about HDDs to be effective in this.

HDD manufacturers probably have and can make a smarter

scheduling. That would probably be holding all the write requests

until they corresponds to 2. whilst doing all the reads as 1.

This would save some time during write but would add a

greater risk of loosing data on a power fail.

And if as above this would give most performance boost

if you have a single (preferably slow) HDD. Any other

setup including faster arrays and / or multiple HDD's in a

smart way would bring minor boost or even lower

performance.

Or am I totally off line ?

/casa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TCQ (command queuing) tries to accomplish number 2. Faster seeks tries to accomplish number 1.

you're inline, but I don't think a drive with faster seeks is going to wear out faster than one with slower seeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this