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Trinity. First Pentium System With PCI 64

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There are a few boards floating around that are S478 with 64 bit PCI, and there have been a few uniprocessor boards using the i440BX/GX chipset with 64 bit PCI in leiu of the AGP slot for a while. The point of these boards so far has been uniprocessor servers, and if you want higher end performance you need to go to dual processor boards in most cases (somewhat understandably). Since you can run multiprocessor boards as uniprocessor systems, and in the case of servers requiring higher performance most purchasers will indeed go to a higher end board, making only DP boards with high performance PCI was not a big deal for quite a period of time. Take for example the C440GX board.

Also, this has a Serverworks chipset and PCI-X, not just regular 64 bit PCI. To make a uniprocessor board which includes 64 bit PCI, currently you must use a multiprocessor capable chipset such as the Serverworks GC-SL/-LE/-HE/-WS, i860, E7500/7501/7505 or similar. To use AGP in a system based on these chipsets, you limit your choices quite a bit (to the GC-WS, i860 and E7505).

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I doubt Intel would let the E7505 be modded to work with a pentium 4. (or even if its possible)... I was thinking that IF SIS could come up with a PCI 64 chipset... or if they could hack PCI-X into an existing SIS chipset... (hopefully supporting the P4C's also)...

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I'd love to see a board with BOTH 64/64 PCI AND an 800 MHz FSB. The 800 MHz FSB, of course, requires a Pentium 4 rather than a Xeon, and will likely do so for quite a while to come because Intel has announced that it does not plan to release 800 MHz FSB Xeons in the foreseeable future.

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I'd love to see a board with BOTH 64/64 PCI AND an 800 MHz FSB.  The 800 MHz FSB, of course, requires a Pentium 4 rather than a Xeon, and will likely do so for quite a while to come because Intel has announced that it does not plan to release 800 MHz FSB Xeons in the foreseeable future.

Oh yes, and an AGP slot too. This would make for an ideal Photoshop machine for large files, where dual processors are usually of limited usefulness but the 32/32 PCI quite a limitation.

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There's no modding required: the E7505 will work with Pentium 4's already, just as the Serverworks GC series will work with the Pentium 4 as well, and the i875 chipset will run a single Xeon. Except for the sockets and onboard processor features (such as SMBus) the chipsets are interchangable technically, although there may be some liscensing issues with it.

Also, the three companies which make PCI-X chipsets right now are Intel, AMD and Serverworks. The reason is that they are actually technically reasonably hard to make and require advanced logic and alot of bandwith to the northbridge.

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There's no modding required: the E7505 will work with Pentium 4's already, just as the Serverworks GC series will work with the Pentium 4 as well, and the i875 chipset will run a single Xeon.  Except for the sockets and onboard processor features (such as SMBus) the chipsets are interchangable technically, although there may be some liscensing issues with it.

Also, the three companies which make PCI-X chipsets right now are Intel, AMD and Serverworks.  The reason is that they are actually technically reasonably hard to make and require advanced logic and alot of bandwith to the northbridge.

I'm not sure who you were replying to, but in case it was me...

Neither the E7505 nor any ServerWorks platforms support the 800MHz FSB, and the i875 provides only 32/32 PCI. So the ideal of a motherboard that provides both 800MHz FSB and 64/64 PCI still appears to remain elusive.

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