Mickey

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Everything posted by Mickey

  1. No, I don't know if there are any CSS (contact start/stop) drives being made any more. Those are the ones where the heads will land on the media during spin up/down to park. This type of design is more sensitive to non-op shock, as the shock impulse goes directly into the slider. Also, the act of parking causes a slight amount of wear, which is why you'd typically see things like park cycles rated for 50K vs. 300K (or more) for rampload drives. Pre-emptive wear leveling is a way to distribute the grease in the pivot bearings. Since bearings are usually designed for 360deg of motion, but only go through ~60deg of travel in a drive, the internal grease can build up on both ends of the stroke. Over enough cycles, this can cause a problem if you have to turn off power to the drive and park the heads, as the actuator has to have enough "oomph" from the back EMF to go over the bump. Something similar can happen with media lube build-up with time, though I don't know if this wear-leveling is also meant to spread out media lube.
  2. Mickey

    can laptop drive sustain 1m drop?

    As others have already said, it all depends on what the drive is dropped onto. It also depends on how it lands, as that will affect the actual energy that is input into the drive. Specs are written so testing is easily reproducible and the results can be compared between different products. Laptop drives still typically use glass media. It can handle higher shock loads than aluminum.
  3. Interesting. It looks like it'd keep the heads from sticking together, but depending on actual points of contact, you might still cause damage. Independent of the fact that most people don't have access to a cleanroom. I wonder if their customers are primarily professional data recovery firms rather than consumers?
  4. Mickey

    Noise From HDD

    My understanding is if you send the HDD to an approved professional data recovery company, your warranty will still be valid and you can get the RMA. The approved list depends on the HDD maker. Either way, it sucks to lose data. Good luck.
  5. Mickey

    Noise From HDD

    I wouldn't bother. The only people with the proper equipment and skills to successfully do this are professional data recovery firms. This might have been possible a few decades ago, when hard drives were literally assembled on factory floors, but certainly isn't possible now.
  6. Mickey

    Noise From HDD

    Drive is dead. The sounds you hear are the heads trying to find their startup and servo information. Most drives will automatically shut off if it cannot initialize within a preset time period. Based on your description of the noises starting after dropping the drive, you are unlikely to have much chance of fixing it yourself. You need to ask yourself how important this data is to you and how much you want to spend on salvaging it, since professional data recovery is likely your only hope.
  7. Mickey

    4TB HDD with 1TB platters

    It is not a rebrand. It's a new platform. As for when 1TB/platter drives will reach multi-platter products, your guess is as good as mine. Seeing an industry-wide delay makes me think there may be a more fundamental technical issue that remains to be resolved. Either that or the customers out there aren't demanding (or willing to pay for) the next areal density jump.
  8. If the picture is accurate, it's a 5-disk platform. In fact, it looks like Hitachi's 5-disk platform. I guess they must have gotten the design from the divestment sale with WD.
  9. There aren't any fuses on the drive PCBA. If the motor is able to come up to speed, I'm inclined to think at least that part of the circuit is still fine. I assume you tested this part by removing the drive from the enclosure and directly connecting it to a SATA port? Another option is putting the drive in a different enclosure, if you don't have access to a spare SATA port. If the drive still won't detect under those conditions, then there is probably some sort of damage to the rest of the board, maybe on the SoC itself. That won't be something you can troubleshoot or fix yourself.
  10. Probably because there is too little profit margin in selling just the enclosure. It also forces you buy the HDD makers' drives. Why make a cheap enclosure (or subsidize one) just so a consumer can buy your competitor's hard drive?
  11. Mickey

    Seagate 7200.10 failure

    If you remove the drive from the docking station and plug it directly to your motherboard, does the drive get detected and stay detected? Could just be a problem with the dock. If it's not the dock and the drive has those symptoms, then it's hard to say definitely where the problem lies. The board is obviously able to spin up the drive, but for whatever reason (not able to stay at speed, head damage, etc.), it shuts down. I'm suspecting a mechanical problem. Sorry, can't help on the diodes.
  12. Mickey

    WHERE BUY BLANK HDD DISC PLATTES

    No, I do not believe you can do this successfully only using a transparent box and gloves. At least, not reliably enough that you can turn this into a business. The "blank" disks are not sold via retail. Each HDD maker buys a proprietary formulation for the platters, either in-house or from one of the few media makers. A regular consumer is not able to just go to one of them and say, "I want to buy 10 disks of whatever you make for the Quantum Bigfoot." Moreover, you still need to safely remove/reinstall the headstack. That requires not only a clean environment, but adequate ESD protection and delicate tools as the heads are so easy to damage.
  13. Mickey

    WHERE BUY BLANK HDD DISC PLATTES

    Physically installing disks isn't that difficult. You typically only need the appropriate Torx screwdriver to install the screws. But without the correct tools, you will not be able to install the headstack properly. Plus, disks are not interchangeable between products. They are usually formatted for a specific product and often even for the specific drive. You cannot simply swap parts and expect to have a working drive afterwards. This ignores needing to do all of this inside a Class 100 cleanroom, too.
  14. Mickey

    WHERE BUY BLANK HDD DISC PLATTES

    Media and headstacks are proprietary in design to each HDD maker and often to specific products. Aside from the difficulty of doing such a swap for the average consumer, there is no place to source new parts. They cannot be purchased off-the-shelf nor are there third-party knockoffs available.
  15. Did a piece fall out or did the drive come that way? If the latter, then it's probably normal, as different motor designs seal that area differently.
  16. Mickey

    4TB HDD with 1TB platters

    I don't think they can rebrand the tech wholesale, at least not for another couple years (or a little less by now).
  17. If the heads somehow got stuck on the media, then it will no longer spin up and/or be detected. Freezing it isn't likely to help, though it's unlikely to hurt it, either. Back in the days of CSS drives, you could try shaking the drive firmly in a rotary motion when spinning up to try and "jar" it off the media so the heads could fly again. With rampload drives (and all 2.5" drives are rampload now, AFAIK), that old trick will no longer work. You are probably out of luck, I'm afraid.
  18. Mickey

    Western Digital Thailand Vs Malaysia

    If the customer is big enough, I'm sure they can insist on their own production lines (and cherry-picked parts, people, etc.).
  19. Mickey

    2.5TB Caviar Black branded as Mediamax?

    The heads and formatting are tuned for a specific spin speed. Swapping with a board that spins faster (or slower) than expected will cause a head crash.
  20. But are the profit margins sufficient to support the R&D needed? That plays a role in how quickly new products are developed.
  21. Well, the initial announcement was 2 years. As for IP, keep in mind that the various HDD makers all have cross-licensing agreements in place for specific portions of their IP portfolio. If the particular tech needed is part of the agreement, it could have been shared even before this merger. I somehow doubt the various regulatory agencies would be happy with wholesale copying, though. At any rate, should be interesting to see this product once it's released/shipping.
  22. I suspect it will be quite a while before you see Hitachi tech under a WD badge. As part of the terms to gain regulatory approval for the merger/buyout, the Hitachi GST and WDT subsidiaries have to run separately for 2 years. So no "cross-pollination," at least not for 2 years.
  23. Mickey

    2.5TB Caviar Black branded as Mediamax?

    It's a WD drive internally, but I have no idea who MediaMax is. Maybe it's a rebadge or OEM reseller? I've seen Dell-branded drives in the past, for example.
  24. Probably pick whichever 7200 rpm 2.5" drive strikes your fancy. I doubt there will be huge differences between models, as customers that really want the higher performance either opt for SSD or hybrid drives and everyone else is going to be more cost-sensitive.
  25. Head positioning becomes trickier as the TPI goes up. It's dependent on a combination of mechanics and servo, whereas BPI improvements are more related to head technology. Obviously, there are design tradeoffs for which gets increased more to achieve a particular areal density. I think what you're seeing is a combination of the inherent technical difficulties of keeping fast random access at higher TPI, plus the recent price increases in raw magnet materials (cost limitations). If most customers don't really care as much about random access as compared to sequential (particularly, with more enthusiast users opting for SSD), then it behooves the manufacturers to optimize for sequential performance, both from a design and cost standpoint.