st63z

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About st63z

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  1. Oh trust me I use both 1394a/USB2 on all my home PCs and trying to equip as many PCs as I can at work w/ it too. But part of the point for a portable 2.5" enclosure for me is being able to use it with as wide a variety of OTHER people's PCs as possible (friends, clients, etc). So I can't dictate the interface in those cases. P.S. BTW just to repeat one of my questions from earlier in the thread since I'm interested again, has anyone also noticed their USB2 ports supplying less power than their USB1 ports? Or it's just me and the adapters I've been using...
  2. Yeah that's what I meant (at least I think, it's an old post and I have a bad memory ). I'm not sure about exact power figures.. I get the feeling different laptops offers different figures (though I assume there's supposed to the a standard)? FWIW according to Addonics, CardBus mode inherently offers lower bus power than 16-bit PCMCIA mode (that's why they say some laptops don't have enough to bus power all drives in CardBus mode -- their PC Card interface adapter as well as those from many other companies have a toggle to switch between the 2 modes). I'm more concerned about USB bus power specs though since it's the one w/ the least power I think while at the same time probably the most popular interface being used. Anyways I wish all manufacturers (of all USB/1394/PC Card hubs, adapters, devices) put clear precise labels on power consumed/supplied right there on the box to end the confusion. Even w/ 1394 6-pin power there are variances in bus power supplied by various hubs, laptop ports (those that have 6-pin), etc. For example I remember my OrangeLink hub w/ the standard AC adapter can only supply a certain total power (to be shared by all hub ports) and they sell an optional hi-capacity AC adapter for higher power, etc...
  3. ^ I forgot to mention the d155's built-in CF/SM/MS flash card reader, but that's not so important to me (though it seems the d155's also targeted at photo printing)... Cheapest I could figure for a color laser equivalent is Minolta-QMS's magicolor 3100 (single-pass 1200dpi) for $1999, plus $499 for its scanner/copier attachment. But this two-piece setup isn't as integrated (no duplex copying). The $799 magicolor 2300 DL is cheaper than the 3100, but it's a four-pass laser and its toners don't last as long. And after you add in the duplexer and 2nd tray you're up to ~$1600 so you might as well go for the 3100 model... Does HP or Xerox offer a cheap scanner/copier attachment for their color lasers? The Lexmark one is very expensive...
  4. HP's OfficeJet d155 multifunction (MFP) all-in-one has got exactly all the features I want in a stand-alone home copier, except the laser (and large-format tabloid/B-size support) http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/un/WF...2019-64982.html Legal-size scanbed, ADF, duplex printing *and* scanning (copying), decent speeds and resolutions, network print server, second input tray (I need to keep 2 paper sizes on hand), etc. Not too bad for $799 MSRP. It won't beat the best 6-color microdroplet photo inkjets on glossy prints, but from what I've seen at work these HP MFP inkjets are reliable workhorses with dependable print quality on plain paper. But I want the two things from laser: much longer time between consumable replacements (more maintenance-free), and cheaper cost/page. So is there a color laser equivalent of this MFP that's not too expensive? Or should I get this inkjet MFP after all? Its 16ppm color speed certainly competes w/ many color lasers (and I don't think you have to wait as long for first-page-out either). In terms of consumables it has the black and tri-color inks, plus individual printheads every 30,000 pages. I don't know how long the ink cartridges last though...
  5. ^ Also, I was being clueless calling the 2300 DL "host-based" even tho it has 200MHz PPC CPU. I was just referring to no built-in PostScript/PCL processing capability. Can anyone explain the disadvantages...
  6. OK, say if consumables/TCO are of secondary importance for now and you're looking for the cheapest cash outlay, are there alternatives to Minolta-QMS's new magicolor 2300 DL? PC Mag seems to like it well enough... $800 MSRP for the printer: host-based 200MHz PPC core, letter-size, 4-pass, 2400x600, 10/100BT. $400 for the autoduplexer, $400 for each 500-sheet cassette, $80 for the 4500-page black toner, $120 for each 4500-page C/M/Y color toner (all MSRP). Now I just need to find out if it's compatible with their $500 SC-215 scanner/copier attachment. Anyone knows?? So for $1200 MSRP I can get a duplex network color laser, another $500 for an integrated multi-function copier (currently using a cheap Brother MFC-9600 laser copier at home). I also wanted tabloid/B-size printing, but what can you do when you're poor Bad thing is w/ Minolta and at this price range, all the places I've seen sell the printer for around MSRP. Whereas for example, my boss had bought the Lexmark C750N for around ~$1500 new from Dell even though MSRP's like $2400 if I recall. So street price comparison isn't as straight forward...
  7. Awesome, also can't wait for the 6GB CF Microdrive!! But you can totally forget about running these new power-hungry 2.5" Travelstars in USB2 enclosures AND running them off bus power (see my posts http://forums.storagereview.net/viewtopic.php?t=5733 )...
  8. Hmm, I just saw Addonics's new Power+ USB 2.0 hub: http://www.addonics.com/products/host_cont...%2Busb2_hub.asp Very interesting, at first I was confused why they're making such a big deal about a standard powered USB hub, but then I saw it's *really* high power. Makes sense for them to release such a product -- they've been advertising ALL of their Pocket series of portable drives (HDD, optical) as being able to run off bus power, including USB bus (in addition to 1394, PC Card). But if you look it up, their various DVD/CD Pocket drives have been eating up more and more max power from one model to the next, up to like 7.5W (at 5V, so at least 1.5A) -- I've been wondering what USB bus power can supply that And of course, my earlier posts in this thread have detailed my borderline power consumption problems with their Pocket ExDrive enclosure when used with various different HDDs. Anyways, this does beg the question, is this new hub unique, or do some other USB hubs/ports on the market already supply around this level of bus power? If so, are they technically illegal outside spec, and could it possibly damage some USB peripherals that really can't handle much more than 0.5A current? Also note that Addonics is offering an optional, even higher-power AC/DC adapter, and a car power adapter (12VDC -> 5VDC I guess?) for the hub. The default AC/DC adapter's "only" rated for 3A, and each of the 4 ports on the hub is capped up to 2A max. So if you use a really power hungry peripheral up to 2A on one port, that leaves little power for the other 3 ports? Thus I'm guessing the high-power adapter would supply like 8A to be able to give 2A to each port (and that's why they say it would be able to run 4 Pocket drives simultaneously)? Man, we're dealing with FireWire level power now Can't wait to get this hub...
  9. Why no one explain about hot plug support? Re my earlier question: http://forums.storagereview.net/viewtopic....p?p=61202#61202
  10. st63z

    Compact Notebook

    My very first notebook was a full-size consumer HP. Got stolen within the first month, argh, grrrr... :evil:
  11. st63z

    Compact Notebook

    One thing I've always been curious about, does IBM have some sort of exclusive patent on titanium shells for their notebooks? But that can't be the case since Apple began using it too. But how come all the rest are using some magnesium alloy or whatnot? Subjectively, the titanium feels a lot sturdier, but may be heavier? P.S. The HP zt series, is that a newer generation of the Omnibook 6100? I almost bought one back then...
  12. st63z

    Compact Notebook

    I'm in the market too but so indecisive. Can't decide between a mainstream dual-spindle (14-15" TFT, 5-6lbs) or a single-spindle ultralight (12" TFT, ~3lbs) with a media underslice attachment. The former category gets you faster and bigger everything (including Mobility Radeon 7500 class grafx), but it's just so tempting to carry around a 3lb mini notebook. I also keep flip-flopping among IBM (ThinkPad X30 or T30), Toshiba (Portege 2000 or 4010), and Dell (Latitude X200 or C640). Those esoteric NEC and Fujitsu models are intriguing but not always practical. Right at this moment I'm hot for IBM. If you can afford the $$$, the new X30 and T30 can be had *loaded* with built-in everything, every state of the art port, connector, wireless (both WiFi and BT), etc. And the X30 ultralight simply has a spectacular battery life to boot (read PC Mag's review). But I guess there's always a compromise, you'll notice the X30 is a bit thicker and heavier than the Toshiba 2000 and Dell X200 ultralights. The Toshibas look best on paper, the 2000 is thinnest/lightest ultralight, the 4010 is lightest dual-spindle at ~4.5lbs (though with only 12" TFT). Incidentally I guess the 4010 would be my pick to serve LOST6200's criteria. The Dells are cost-effective value propositions that make sense. Off the shelf modular parts and cheap accessories. They still win their share of awards and many people are satisfied customers.
  13. I think it was mentioned in one of these previous threads, but Toshiba's shipping a 60GB version now: http://news.com.com/2100-1040-960615.html I guess the 40GNX is still tops, but if you want the biggest "performance" capacity this might be it? Personally, I'm now trying to find the lowest power-consumption 40-60GB drive that can run off *all* USB bus power. In other words, something that can spin up under 5V 500mA?
  14. At this point I'm especially looking for a comparison on the power consumption of 2.5" HDDs (for bus-powered external drive usage): http://forums.storagereview.net/viewtopic.php?t=5733
  15. Argh, no editing function! Just wanted to add that the Addonics universal connector extends to all of their drives, including CD/DVD optical drives (mobile and pocket series). But Archos tech support told me that their Cesar portable CD-RW drive uses yet another interface for USB2/Firewire/PCMCIA cables!? Oh the insanity...