Fel

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About Fel

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  1. Ok, thanks for all your replies. In my experience, stuff breaks, be it from faulty parts, general use, someone kicking it(on accident or on purpose), circuit board shorts out, etc. I wanted to know what my chances of recovering the data on the drives was if the actual NAS unit stopped working for some reason. What got me started thinking about it was a friend of mine has raid 0 on his motherboard, so he basically had a mirror of his system, and I asked him what happens if the motherboard dies? He didn't have a good answer, and it got me thinking about NAS Units that people use for media storage, what if the NAS dies but the disks are ok, can you move them to a different NAS and they will work, and if so, how? Is it easy or hard to do? So it is good to know that you can do that with some units depending on how they are set up, and that will help me make a purchasing decision in the future.
  2. I'm sorry, it is a hypothetical situation. I am wondering what happens when the actual NAS device fails, and you are left with a set of hard disks. Is there a way to retrieve your data? Basically, if I get a NAS and have it set up in Raid 0 or Raid 5, and the NAS dies, what happens to all my data, i'd prefer not to lose it. Lets say it is a NAS with hardware Raid 5 or hardware Raid 0
  3. Hi, Hypothetically, if I have a NAS and the device dies (not the drives) can I move the drives into another NAS and still have my data? Does it matter what RAID the system was using? Does the new NAS need to be the same model or manufacturer? Just trying to figure out how to recover from the NAS dying. Thanks
  4. Yeah this is more in the budget than a new server... I am figuring this project to fall into a $2,500 - $3,000 range. The cost of a new server with this kind of storage, plus a backup solution for it is well above that, and the cost of online storage for this much data makes it a non-option. Do you have a suggestion on what drives to use for this. It seems like Hitachi 3tb drives have been getting good reviews, but the ones I found on new-egg I can't find on Hitachi's website at all and that bothers me, a lot actually. This is what I found on Newegg: HITACHI Deskstar H3IK30003272SW (0S03208) 3TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive or HITACHI Deskstar 0S03086 3TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive But these models do not appear as an option on Hitachi's site. I initially went there trying to find where to buy them... as I would like retail drives that don't come through ups/fedex/etc... and I want to be able to return/replace a drive if there are any problems without waiting for shipping/process/shipping situation. Thanks for your reply, I have checked out the Synology unit you linked to and it fits in my price range.
  5. Hi, We have about 1.25tb of data, and a growth rate of about 500gb/year which we figure will continue to grow by 12.5% a year. Data 5 years or older will be archived and removed from active projects, so eventually the amount of increase will be reduced by the amount removed. start at January 1, 2011: 1.125tb expected data size at end of year 2011: 1.75tb expected data size at end of year 2012: 2.313tb expected data size at end of year 2013: 3.016tb expected data size at end of year 2014: 3.895tb expected data size at end of year 2015: 4.993tb expected data size at end of year 2016: 5.116tb expected data size at end of year 2017: 5.083tb expected data size at end of year 2018: 4.916tb etc... Currently the data is on a server with Raid 5 with a spare. But the server is at 85% capacity and we need a new solution. I was thinking of getting two 4-bay NAS and putting 4x3tb hdd's in them in a mirrored setup and then doing a full backup of the one nas to the other on a weekly basis. This would give us 6TB of redundant space, and in case of total failure we would have the secondary device that we could bring online as the main device and fix/replace the failed NAS... 1. This is a small marketing company of 8 employees that does a lot of video(SD and HD) and large art like buses and billboards. 2. Is this a good solution? If not, what would you recommend for handling this amount of data? 3. What devices are recommended as far as being reliable and able to backup NAS to NAS without needing some other software to do it? 4. Do you have any other suggestions or ideas, any help with this is greatly appreciated. Thanks.
  6. Fel

    64-bit OS?

    Sorry, yes it is a Core 2 Duo 2.2ghz, 3gb ram, but I guess since you asked that, it means there is some tie between 64bit OS and specific hardware which is what I wanted to know. The laptop begot the question. I got Vista Ultimate because I wanted all the home and business features. I had run into issues at work with Vista Business not being able to play DVD movies (which was resolved with a free codec pack) as well as other issues, but I wanted some of the features like hdd encryption etc. that didn't seem available from any of the home versions. The price difference was only about $10 to have it pre-installed by the manufacturer, so I figured it was a good move.
  7. Fel

    64-bit OS?

    I know very little about 64bit OS, but I wanted to upgrade my 32bit Vista Ultimate to Windows 7. Is it possible to upgrade that laptop to Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit? I don't understand how the OS and the Hardware interact in that way. Maybe this is a dumb question, idk, help me out ^^
  8. Hi, I am looking for an excellent (good or ok doesn't cut it) home backup software. In the past I have used (not for myself) Retrospect, BackupExec, and NTBackup. I am fine if you tell me that NTBackup is the way to go or if you tell me I am nuts. Please make any recommendations you have on the best way to approach this. I have been out of the backup game for a long time and never really had a need for home backup before. Now that I do, I would love some advice on the best way to go. I have: 2 desktops, 2 Laptops desktops: 2 x WinXP SP3 Laptop 1: WinXP SP3 Laptop 2: Vista Ultimate (not sure atm on the SP) I am not backing up any MSSQL Server or Exchange info (though as it is a home system you would probably thought that already) In total there is about 400gb of data that would need to be backed up. The majority of it is stagnant so I wanted to do an initial full backup of each machine and then weekly differentials. Does that sound reasonable? Also is it worth backing up system state? I have a 1TB External drive connected to the network that I would like to use as the backup media.