Brian

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Posts posted by Brian


  1. Overall, the Kingston DC500R SSD is an impressive drive in a class that is at times overlooked. As fun as high-performance NVMe and other technologies are, SATA drives still carry most of the water when it comes to server or storage controller boot duties, where reliability is critical. They also make for affordable in-server storage where capacity and price are key, along with all of the other TCO benefits SSDs offer over HDDs. For its part, the DC500R placed near the top of the charts in a many of our tests, when compared with other worthy drives. All in all, the DC500R is a good option for use cases that use the SATA interface and need a reliable, well-performing drive with good endurance and a range of capacities.

    Kingston DC500R Enterprise SSD Review


  2. It's going to depend entirely on your workload. I think what we've come to find is that 3:1 is pretty typical across a wide range of workloads and industries. In the new release for Unity, pasted below, they're claiming 5:1. 5:1 feels a little aggressive but Dell EMC is generally very conservative with these claims, so there's reason to believe. 

     

    https://www.storagereview.com/dell_emc_launches_new_storage_and_data_protection_solutions


  3. When compared to other CPUs in the SKU list we can see that they have relatively more cores and have a lower base speed then other CPUs around this price point. This allows the CPUs to service more VM’s, albeit at a lower speed then other CPUs at this price point. One of the keys to having good performance on a server running virtual workloads is to have the VMs run on the same cores in a CPU whenever possible as this will result in better usage of the CPU’s L1 and L2 memory cache. So when running many VMs on a server having a CPU with more cores running at a slower speed will give better overall performance than having a CPU with fewer cores running at faster speeds. 

    Full Story


  4. All the SSDs should work in a QNAP or Synology for instance. The enterprise drives largely add endurance as you note. We've used a lot of DCT 860s and they've been great. Even used them in a white paper for QNAP/Veeam that was pretty fun. Anyway, if the price is close, I'd lean toward the enterprise drives. You'll get much better support too, no arguing about workload if there's a problem.