JJ Johnson

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JJ Johnson last won the day on February 18 2015

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About JJ Johnson

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  1. There's just not much demand for big HDDs in laptops. I see that 1TB HDDs in low price laptops are pretty common now, but only because they're very cheap and they're more storage than most anyone cares about in a laptop. Higher priced laptops get SSDs of smaller capacity, indicating that capacity isn't the main concern.
  2. Was the platter density of these drives ever determined? I'm also wondering about some of the lower capacity Red (non-Pro) drives and whether they've moved on from 1TB platters yet.
  3. A little OT... but do any of the more consumer oriented cloud services offer anything similar? Dropbox offers up to 1TB of storage for $10 per month, but there's no way I'll ever upload 1TB of data over a 10Mbps link in a reasonable amount of time. $200 is cost-prohibitive, and all the typical consumer would need is to mail off a 1 or 2 TB laptop drive.
  4. I have to ask, though .... In mission-critical applications, are many organizations really using HDD for long term offline storage? I'm thinking tape is still king for things like corporate backups, archiving and similar applications. Eventually, once flash memory becomes cheap enough, hard drives will vanish. There will just be very little reason for them to exist. It certainly won't be for mass storage applications. There's virtually no way that HDDs will increase in data density as quickly as flash. Indeed, with 16TB 2.5" SSDs available today, SSDs have already surpassed mechanical drives in storage density per unit volume.
  5. Recently I've noticed that Seagate drive prices have fallen considerably faster than those of Western Digital. At least, I've observed this for both desktop drives and low end server/NAS drives. WD prices on comparable drives have fallen very little in the past year. Any particular reason? Is Western Digital running away with the market, forcing Seagate to compete on price?
  6. This?? Hardly what I'd call hard data. We do know that WD cripples their desktop drive firmware for use in RAID systems, where they're very likely to be dropped from a RAID array. Very popular drives, they alone could account for this difference. Desktop drives from other manufacturers aren't all similarly sabotaged.
  7. This article really told us very little. It could pass for advertising copy from Seagate. Did someone from Seagate also write it? The hardware comparisons in the article are mostly between enterprise drives and the consumer drives. So you're showing readers that enterprise drives that cost 1.5x to 3x as much as their consumer counterparts are made better? I would certainly hope so. You'd have a real scoop if that weren't the case. The real meat is the difference, if any, between desktop drives and this relatively new wave of drives marketed to consumers as "NAS" drives. You only reinforce (without saying so) the common belief that there are minimal physical differences between the desktop drives and consumer NAS drives. In fact, when talking about desktop drives and comparing them to the alternatives, the article seems to purposely blur the distinction between these consumer NAS drives and enterprise drives. The other issue is that 24/7 usage in a typical home NAS environment is often _less_ stressful than desktop drives have traditionally been subject to. Users might store some movies and TV shows on the NAS, then the NAS streams them for a few hours a day. This is very low stress usage. Maybe you also use the NAS for nightly system backups, so another hour or so of use. If the drives in the NAS spin down when not in use, then they're most likely idle for 18-22 hours a day. Calling this a "24/7" environment is extremely misleading.
  8. Yeah, I checked that page. I've actually gotten into the habit of weighing new hard drives on my kitchen scale to get a good idea of how many platters they have, since WD seems intent on changing things up without updating model numbers. The 5TB Red has come down to $200 on Amazon and Newegg, and I'm tempted to get a couple. I'm a little reluctant to buy a 5 platter drive, though. Don't ask me why ... I suppose that it just seems like more mechanical items that can go wrong, although I suppose the trade-off is either more platters and heads or higher, potentially less reliable platter density.
  9. Are these currently four or five-platter drives?
  10. I think the reason they make so few is that the margins must get very slim under $50 once you've factored in the cost of the controller, case, connectors and manufacturing. Soon it will be difficult to find new 120GB SSDs. We're already seeing new drives introduced where the smallest model is 250GB. That article is pretty out of date.
  11. I picked up a very inexpensive 60GB Mushkin ECO2 from New Egg for $35 last week for a little miniITX server build. I wasn't expecting blazing speed. Like I said, just curious.
  12. I received a new SSD last week and in my enthusiasm to set up a new computer, immediately began installing Windows and my applications, and configuring and customizing everything - the whole nine yards. Now, just out of curiosity, I was wondering if I can benchmark the SSD. Is this still possible? Is it wise? Would it be an accurate benchmark? I suppose I could always image the drive to another disk, run my tests, and then re-image the SSD, but I'm far too lazy to take such an approach.
  13. It may just be a template file somewhere. I was just looking at some vBulletin notifications. The difference is that they don't have the member name linked to their profile. I can't think of why that's really necessary in the email. You can always click to it from the message in the forum itself.
  14. Whenever I receive a forum's notification email (I probably belong to several dozen forums), by habit, I click the first link in the email, expecting it to take me to the reply. I seldom bother to read the email itself, because quite often there are multiple replies in the thread. The notifications from this forum, however, place a link to the poster's member profile first, and I always mistakenly clicking it. Please consider rearranging these notifications so that a link to the thread's new posts is topmost in the message. Thanks.
  15. So, is the MX200 a replacement for the MX100 line, less than a year after the MX100 was released?