OldGuy

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About OldGuy

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  1. OldGuy

    Harddrive sleep and XP

    I'm familiar with it since before and hasn't gotten any result with it on neither a SiS AMD board nor an Intel P4 board. The referred to threads contain user experiences of similar result as well. Either way it's a fairly shitty piece of software made for Win98 and WinNT in '99. It's only natural to be problematic two OS releases after that. Powersaving management routines has had a lot of development over the days of NT4.
  2. OldGuy

    Harddrive sleep and XP

    I'm afraid that Hard Disk Sleeper is not an option. It was written in '99 and does not seem to work for hardly anyone with WinXP or even most people with Win2k. I have other complaints about how it's done besides that, but it doesn't really matter. Either way, a working tool sure seems to be missing for this area.
  3. I made a search but didn't find any real results, only people looking for the same but not getting anywhere. I have looked around for some tool that would allow for putting an individual drive to sleep in WinXP, but haven't even seen the smoke of any. Is it a totally overlooked area where a smart programmer could get huge acclaim? Really there should be interest enough for thousands of people to be able to go beyond the simple powersaving setting of one for all drives in Windows? Back in the old days of DOS I could do this, but don't even try running those tools under a modern operating system. Any programmers around?
  4. Ouch! 8O Thanks for the heads up on that one.
  5. OldGuy

    Seagate cuda V or IBM 180gxp?

    Good luck there, donkeyotea. I hope you get one that has lower idle noise than mine. Seek crunching sounds feels homey in comparison to idle whirring. 8)
  6. Ah, that rings a bell. Might have read something about that a while ago. Tried to install PGPdisk, but it barfs on the installation claiming a file copy problem. Tried to download from different three loactions and install the program on another disk, but the same result. Perhaps this free version just wont work on WinXP-SP1 or something. I'll have a look at the commersial alternatives later.
  7. Thanks for the software hints. I'll check those out. Perhaps even the freeware PGPdisk can cover the need well enough. Just in case everyone's not just anti-MS by default but also knows something about how well the NTFS file encryption system works, then I'm still curious since it would after all be easy to use.
  8. I don't see how file corruption would be more or less problematic with encryption. If it happens it's a big enough problem either way. Backups are taken oftenly enough so that backtracking from harddrive failure or whatever wont take a fortune of working time. Bolting the system to the desk might not be a practical solution for his office. As stated, there is more than a few individual files involved.
  9. OldGuy

    quietest 7.200 drive !?

    It shouldn't be, but the question is in what way? There are different types of noise. If it's vibration noise then having a look at how it's fitted to the bay might do a lot of difference, like using some soft vibration absorbing material between the bay and the bay and the rest of the case. If on the other hand it's the high pitched idle motor noise then you might be qualified for RMA'ing the drive since then there seems to be somehing slightly wrong with the unit you got.
  10. I'm pondering how to best advice a friend with a small firm regarding file level encryption. He does use backups and puts them into a secure place, but just in case the firm gets a breakin it might be a good idea to have some local encryption on the work files as well. It wouldn't have to be a perfect defense against someone specifically going after the contents of the harddrive (it's not quite that sensitive material anyway), but well enough to keep the regular hoodlum away from it. Then again, more and more people tend to know someone with "special skills" these days. WinXP has it built in trough NTFS of course, but how easy is it to "take over" the decryption permission through means of reinstalling the system or something like that? At least it doesn't seem enough to simply get administrator access, as I made a quick test with that. So perhaps it's safe enough, but I don't have much more experience than that so I thought I'd just ask for others more detailed experiences. If it would be best to use a third party software, what can be recommended? Preferably something that can be tested for a while before purchase. (small firm, always low on spare funds) It will have to work with WinXP of course, and handle entire folders or drives rather than individual files at a time. I have a feeling I'm not the only one interested in these things so perhaps raising the subject can enlighten others as well.
  11. OldGuy

    Seagate cuda V or IBM 180gxp?

    Wich unfortunately has such a big effect on performance that one could simply have gotten a Seagate to begin with. At least on my 180GXP the difference was huge in quiet mode. Seagates drives does not need case wadding either, bar possibly some vibration if the case is prone to amplify that kind of noise. That can usually be countered fairly well with anti-vibration materials like rubber rather than sound proofing material. Avoid nonstandard solutions, get quiet running parts. I've learned that the hard way.
  12. OldGuy

    Seagate cuda V or IBM 180gxp?

    It can only reduce seek noises (clicking and that kind of stuff), wich really isn't amongst the worst noises a drive typically makes. On the Seagates the quiet mode only results in a loss of about 1ms of seek time, but on the 180GXP it's a lot, lot more so you'll typically not want to touch that setting.
  13. OldGuy

    Seagate cuda V or IBM 180gxp?

    I only have limited practical experience since my first and so far only 180GXP is in the RMA loop to be replaced for (hopefully) being more noisy than it should be. But if you want to be really safe on the noise side, and we're talking about that hellish high pitched idle noise that most drives have, go with the Seagate Barracuda 5. I'll see how my new 180GXP behaves in a couple of weeks or so, to see if I should have gone with the safer choice.
  14. OldGuy

    Noisy 180GXP, normal or bad drive?

    Are you sure it's just a temporal noise? These high freqency tones are very "directional" in a sense as turning the head a number of degrees may make it seem to go away. Well if they are supposed to be quiet that's a part of what sells the product. There's no way I would buy a Western Digital today for instance. And in this case there's also the heavy sawtoothing and early dip below 10MB/s in the performance graph wich may also indicate some physical flaw. Wich in turn may be what creates this louder, constant, high tone beep.
  15. OldGuy

    Noisy 180GXP, normal or bad drive?

    Thanks. Then this one will definitely go back to the retailer. Just a bit more dough to dish out, a number of weeks of waiting and then it should be fine. :?