shady28

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About shady28

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  1. shady28

    Western Digital Raptor WD360GD

    Sorry but in terms of performance, this drive is still way behind SCSI. As your review notes, it has the performance of 7200 RPM SCSI which is effectively a dead market (and has been for about a year and a half - ever since 15k RPM SCSI came out). I bought one of the 2nd generation 15k Cheetahs over a year ago, and it's still quite a bit faster than any of the IDE drives. All of this is kind of a mute point. Until PCI-X becomes common on desktops current SCSI and even RAID IDE drives can saturate the bus. This is a major killer to the hard disk industry right now, there just isnt a whole lot more that can be done for mainstream hard disk performance until the PCI bus is phased out.
  2. shady28

    Solid state disk drives

    Not all SSDs are based on RAM.. From : http://www.bitmicro.com/products_edsw_specs.html Flash disk drive, capacity 128MB - 75GB, < .48ms access times (48us), 34 MB/Sec sustained xfer rate, 40MB/sec burst, uses U2W SCSI interface and can be setup in a RAID configuration. And : "The 2.5-inch E-Disk 2A66 and 3.5inch E-Disk 3A66 ATA/UDMA-66 flash drive devices are the first in the industry. These flash drives support PIO Modes 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 and UDMA Modes 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4. By eliminating seek time, latency and other electro-mechanical delays inherent in conventional hard disk drives (HDD), they have read and write rates of up to 66.6 MB/sec and random access time of less than 0.068 milliseconds. " If you look at the specs for various models, you'll find some that have 320Mb/sec transfer rates, all with the <1ms access times. All of these devices are based on Flash memory.
  3. shady28

    Solid state disk drives

    More.. http://www.business.com/bdcframe.asp?ticke...storage_devices "The 2.5-inch E-Disk 2A66 and 3.5inch E-Disk 3A66 ATA/UDMA-66 flash drive devices are the first in the industry. These flash drives support PIO Modes 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 and UDMA Modes 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4. By eliminating seek time, latency and other electro-mechanical delays inherent in conventional hard disk drives (HDD), they have read and write rates of up to 66.6 MB/sec and random access time of less than 0.068 milliseconds. The UDMA E-Disks are high capacity flash disk drives available in a variety of sizes. The low-profile E-Disks in 2.5-inch HDD footprint are offered with 128 MB minimum capacity under 8.5 mm and up to 17408 MB in 24.9 mm height. The 3.5-inch version comes with maximum capacity of 77824 MB in 50.4 mm height and minimum capacity of 128MB in 13.13 mm height"
  4. shady28

    Solid state disk drives

    cas wrote: Suspend to RAM motherboards do not shave a minute off boot time, because you dont reboot when you bring the box back from sleep mode. And you will be completely screwed if you ever run out of RAM. Unless, of course, you arent doing anything important on your computer. RAM is volatile.Contemporary SSDs with the capacities and performance being discussed, use RAM. System RAM is no more fundamentally volatile than the RAM in a Solid State Disk.
  5. shady28

    Solid state disk drives

    Ok, gloves are off. I am generally dismayed, although not shocked, by the lack of knowledge here. First off, what is the first thing you usually do after installing a new kernel on a recompile in linux, or any version of unix? REBOOT. Second, what do you usually have to do to an NT box if you install, or in some cases change, services? REBOOT. Does a RAMDISK make your computer boot faster? NO. ITS SLOWER BECAUSE THE RAMDISK HAS TO BE LOADED. If you have infinte RAM on your PC, will it still use your disk bound swap space? YES When you link and compile a C program on any system, will it go to disk and read your object files, libraries, and source code and make intensive use of your disk? YES Is this access sequetial or random? RANDOM. Will an SSD with 100Mb/Sec xfer rate regarless of type of access and an access time of .03ms (yes point - zero - three, from specs on some of the SSD drives ive seen) be faster than a 15k rpm 3.8ms access Cheetah with a xfer rate between 28 and 56 mb/sec? HELL YES, ESPECIALLY ON PROGRAM COMPILES. The original post was simply asking if any of these such devices had come down to a price point that was reasonable in my estimation (<$1000) and might be worthwhile if you are doing something like, say, developing software on your at a rate of $80/hour. I was not asking if this was reasonable for some teenager playing Quake. People make the *bad* assumption that what they use their PCs for is what everyone else uses them for, or that their idea of 'justified expense' is the same for all cases. It is not.
  6. shady28

    Solid state disk drives

    RAM Disk software is not the same as SSD. SSD's keep the data after you turn off the power, just like a hard disk. Such devices would need to be made up of very fast flash memory or similar technology. Lots of uses for this. Instant boot-ups. On a linux box, very fast kernel compiles and subsequent reboots. SSD based swap space. Magnetic RAM (MRAM) is coming out next year, and may be just the thing to make SSD's a reality.
  7. shady28

    Solid state disk drives

    I figured as much as far as prices. Memory cards like CF and MMC btw perform much worse than even modern 5400 RPM IDE drives. Try 11ms access times and 1-3 MB/Sec xfer rate. Even a small (say 1GB) SSD would be nice for personal use. That is big enough to put the OS and swap space for a typical PC on the SSD. The ones I did find that supported 320-4GB capacities were around $4000, but had access times of .3ms and sustained xfer rate of 40mb/sec and 100mb/sec burst. That particular one used a SCSI interface. Imagine what your boot up time would be with something like that =)
  8. Just curious if anyone knows of any inexpensive (ie < $1000) solid state disk drives that use either SCSI or ATA interfaces. Searching around on the web I've only found some fairly high end ones for enterprise purposes (prices were all over $4000 starting with 320MB drives). Thanks! Dan Davis
  9. shady28

    Ultra 320 SCSI?

    Ultra 160 should be more than enough to handle 2 X15's at the same time, even if they are both pumping out data as fast as they can. There is an interesting article over on arstechnica.com that talks about SCSI. The thing that is relevant to your post here is the max bandwidth of normal PCI - basically, unless you are using the DC-390U3W in a 64 bit 66Mhz slot, your PCI bus will max out before your Ultra160 SCSI controller does. So, on a typical system, going beyond Ultra160 is somewhat a moot point - at least until new PCI specs come into play (supposedly PCI-x is coming with a bandwidth of 1033Mb/s. Current 32 bit 33Mhz PCI is 133Mb/s if memory serves). A pair of Cheetah's going full speed on Ultra160 are quite capable of saturating 32 bit PCI busses as it is. As an aside, rather than upgrade to an Ultra320 controller, its probably a better idea to spend the money on a motherboard with 66Mhz 64 bit PCI slots. This would increase the capacity of the PCI bus to 533Mb/s. Cheers, Dan Davis