rfarris

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About rfarris

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    <a href='/patron.html'><b>StorageReview Patron</b></a>

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    http://www.big-rick.com
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  • Location
    31 32' 55.55" N 110 16' 19.4" W
  • Interests
    Uzis, napalm, gunpowder and ben-wa balls.<br>
  1. Good question, Slug. Did you ever find out?
  2. Bridging Home LANs

    The way Tivo works is that it copies the data locally. It can be started while the transfer is in process, but it buffers enough that you never have to wait for the data that is coming across. My brother has a Netgear router -- Linux based, I think -- and it has built in software to use one of those services that keeps your site available if the cable company changes your IP. Thanks for the comments.
  3. Bridging Home LANs

    No, really. Is this a stupid idea or a tough technical challenge; or is it just boring? I could use some ideas here.
  4. Bridging Home LANs

    Both my brother and I have home LANs. He's in Arizona and I'm in California. We both use cable Internet access. I'm familiar with VPNs. There is no problem for me to VPN into his server, and likewise coming this direction. But now we have more complex networks, including Tivo boxes. I figure we could use Internet Connection Sharing to bridge over into the far-end network, but I'd rather set up a VPN with endpoints on the routers, so that basically, we have completely, transparently merged our networks. That way I could watch shows on his Tivo, and he could watch my Tivo. Does anyone know which routers (home routers, please!) support this VPN network bridging feature? Or maybe my idea is stupid. Maybe you could explain why. Thanks!
  5. CRT vs LCD

    That is a gross over statement. While crts have some good points -- for instance, flexible resolution and generally speaking, much higher resolution -- if you were to compare an lcd and a crt at the same screen-size and resolution, the lcd can be much better. Lcds don't flicker, they're absolutly flat, and their geometry is much better. On top of that, the lcd takes hardly any deskspace. A three lcd setup is a real luxury. A three crt setup uses up all your desktop and creates a lot of heat.
  6. What is ASUS thinking? Are they losing their marbles? This is from their most recent Intel (P5WD2) mobo, here.
  7. Maxtor 500Gb in Q3.

    Hey, if you want to apologize for something, how about apologizing for making copy after copy of entire other messages in the very next message? Do you think we can't see it up there? Do you think we won't figure out what you're referring too? Do you have any idea what that little arrow over there on the right, under the quote-icon does?
  8. LCD TV or LCD monitor?

    I'd like to have a monitor the size of a drawing board. It would be ok if things that are not in the center aren't razor sharp. That way I could push things off to the sides that I'm not currently working on, but I'd still be able to see/find things that I want to pull into the center. I think it would be hard to build a monitor with very fine pixels in the 32"x18" center, and grosser pixels in the rest of the monitor. As is I have a three-monitor setup with the middle monitor being the one where I normally work, with Outlook, Quicken, documentation, tunes, forums, etc on the wings. It's still not normally as large as a draft board.
  9. Make up your mind, Olaf! Is it 51.0 gbit/s or is it 2.0 gbit/s?
  10. Best VGA PDA

    It's very common of the opinion you're hearing here. Folks that have always owned Palm platforms are certain that Palm is the best. People whose primary portable device is a telephone then they will trt to convince you that a smartphone would be the best. Someone that has a hard-on about Palm or Microsoft will try to convince you that anything is better than Palm or Pocket PC -- like Linux or Zaurus (still their own OS, right?) or uhh ... I can't remember the other. Personally, I've owned every Newton that ever was made, almost all of the Palms, a Rex (remember that?) and currently I have an iPAQ, with vga, wifi, bluetooth, CF, and SD. The device that was the best to me was the last generation of Newtons. That was a fine device. The most stable and easy to use is definitely Palm. In my opinion the reason it is so stable is because it is a jumped up organizer. If that's what you're interested in -- a place to save your contacts and appointments -- Palm is the best. It never loses any data and there are very well crafted appointment and contact replacements. The Pocket PCs are not very stable. They are rebooted often as many as a few times a day, and not very times do they make it longer than a couple of days without booting. The 3rd party appointment programs, for instance, are jokes, making their "upgrades" to the built in appointments are simply ways to change the color schemes, or maybe move things around on the screen. Some folks like the smartphones -- but people like me who never use a cell phone the screen is far, far too small. If you live out of your cell phone having a smartphone can add some useful additions. Personally, I don't use a phone and I'm far interested in the idea of having a real (small) computer in my pocket. In that case, the Windows 2003 Second Edition on a VGA screen is very nice. I have the iPAQ hx4700 and after four or five months (first Pocket PC) I'm beginning to make my hx4700 useful. The Pocket PC is much more closer to a Newton than it is to a Palm, though. If your most important thing is to carry around your personal information, Palm is very nice. In many ways it is like a Mac -- you know, you don't have to learn very much to use the Palm, it isn't very exciting functions, but then again, it just keeps on working. The idea that someone can say either Pocket PC or Palm is better is not possible. That's like trying to decide whether a dirt bike or a Harley is better. They 're both different. -- Rick P.S. I love having 2 GB of mp3's in my SD slot, played in a very high definition 2-channel playing in my hx4700...
  11. Defrag Program Suggestions

    I don't know what axe you've got to grind, pal, but you started out quoting a supposed authority, and now that it's been pointed out that you misquoted, you're claiming that your authority doesn't know what he's talking about. Do we believe your authority, or do we believe you? What's your point? What's your stake in this?
  12. Posting from San Diego, I can assure you that under the right conditions (high humidity, basically) water will condense on a fan. I have one of those Patton "industrial" fans with the metal grill around it, and in the summer time, there are drops of water hanging on the grill on the output side of the fan. Hard to believe, but true.
  13. Quit spreading that crap, Vadim. Go back and read the article. It says no such thing: Here's the exact quote: "... defragmentators are just harmful at one-time application. If you launched it even one time, you would need to launch it then at least once a month to be saved from new files fragmentation." His English is a little rough around the edges, but careful reading pays off.
  14. Defrag Program Suggestions

    Not quite. It claims that if you use a Windows API defragger that you need to run it at least once a month. Here's the exact quote: "... defragmentators are just harmful at one-time application. If you launched it even one time, you would need to launch it then at least once a month to be saved from new files fragmentation." His English is a little rough around the edges, but careful reading pays off.
  15. Pop-up ads - WTF?

    The most recent countermeasure I've discovered is filling your etc/hosts file with entries like this: 127.0.0.1 localhost 127.0.0.1 www.doubleclick.net 127.0.0.1 ad.preferances.com 127.0.0.1 ad.doubleclick.com 127.0.0.1 ads.web.aol.com 127.0.0.1 ad.doubleclick.net 127.0.0.1 ad.preferences.com 127.0.0.1 ad.washingtonpost.com 127.0.0.1 adpick.switchboard.com 127.0.0.1 ads.doubleclick.com 127.0.0.1 ads.infospace.com 127.0.0.1 ads.msn.com 127.0.0.1 ads.switchboard.com 127.0.0.1 ads.enliven.com 127.0.0.1 oz.valueclick.com 127.0.0.1 doubleclick.net 127.0.0.1 ads.doubleclick.net If you google around you can find large lists of them. It makes pages load oh so much faster, and pretty much completely blocks banner ads. I still get that ZipZoomFly Flash ad down at the bottom of the page, though.