bennt

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Everything posted by bennt

  1. bennt

    SCSI vs SATA

    This might help, taken from SR: http://www.storagereview.com/guide2000/ref...pts/relRel.html MTBF = Mean Time Between Failures
  2. bennt

    SCSI vs SATA

    I agree. However, putting 2 drives in a RAID0 doubles the chances of disk failure (extremely simplified logic). A single drive failure in the array takes down the system. If you were to put 3 drives in a RAID0, your chances of failure would be 3 times. This is a very simplified explanantion, but I hope you get the gist. In reality, I think that when you actually calculate predicted failure rates of RAID0 arrays the factor is higher than simply the number of disks.
  3. bennt

    SCSI vs SATA

    Exactly.
  4. bennt

    Suggestions for large, quiet system drive?

    For a nice, decent sized case that is very quiet, good quality, and has a good layout, your can't go wrong with the Antec Sonata. Comes with a good quality and quiet 380W PS. Comes with a temp controlled 120mm exhaust fan, and room for another 120mm in the front. The front intake has a easily removable filter to keep things clean on the inside. Has room for several HD's, which mount on special trays that isolate the drives using rubber gromets. The optical drive bays have rails that makes it easy to change things around. Alot of HD noise can be reduced by isolating them from the case.
  5. bennt

    SCSI vs SATA

    Supermicro has been our servers of choice for the last couple years and we've been very happy with them. Don't have specific experience with workstation class Supermicro systems, but I will say that their products are excellent quality. In terms of disks, don't try to replace individual disks with larger RAID arrays split into mutliple partitions. You will likely see a performance hit. Also, RAID 0 reduces reliabilty of the computer quite a bit. Loss of data may not be a big deal, but I'm sure down time is something you would like to avoid.
  6. bennt

    Best Monitor

    If you want to know almost everything about current LCD's, here is a long, but very informative article (the one I refered to above): http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/other/dis.../lcd-guide.html
  7. bennt

    Best Monitor

    The idea that CRT's give off harmful radiation is pretty much a myth. The only way to be exposed to radiation would be to put your head beside the back of the monitor, next to the electron gun, and hold it there for hours and hours. Since most people sit on the other side it isn't much of an issue. I read a really good article recently that talked about that in detail, including the science behind it. I think it was over at x-bit labs. For gaming, no LCD can quite match a normal CRT. For an LCD to have no ghosting at all, it would need to be 4ms (true 4ms, not the way manufactures claim their current specs). The fastest LCD's at the moment are 8ms, but even that is kinda false. That said, LCD's are pretty cool. I'm not a hard core gamer, but I do play a few games and LCD's are okay. Basically, there is no perfect LCD that can do everything. Some are okay for gaming, most are fine for desktop, few are okay for graphics work, but all are nice and small.
  8. bennt

    Best Monitor

    If you want the best all round performer, then CRT is the way to go. Plus it will be the cheapest. If you are set on LCD, you should first tell us what your primary uses are (games, internet surfing and office applications, graphics, movies, etc.).
  9. bennt

    Win2k and swap file size

    Well, with the way a page file works, if you have tonnes of ram all info will remain in memory even though some will also be paged out to the page file. Windows makes a copy of the least used "pages" and sticks it in the page file. If an app needs more ram than is available, then it can take the stuff that has been copied to the page file. So you can see, that this process will run at the speed of the ram, and there won't be any performance hit.
  10. bennt

    Giant AntiSpyware

    Actually, I was right the first time: http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2...17statement.asp
  11. bennt

    Win2k and swap file size

    I don't agree with you. Why hold something in main memory if it isn't getting used much. Also, if you didn't keep some memory free, the next application that demanded a chunk of memory would have to wait until the system made some room by moving some stuff to the page file, which would obviously take longer than if it was already there.
  12. bennt

    Giant AntiSpyware

    Whoops, I take that back. The article I was thinking of is that MS is dropping McAfee and picking up TrendMicro for use with their Hotmail service. http://software.silicon.com/security/0,390...39126640,00.htm
  13. bennt

    Giant AntiSpyware

    Wasn't Giant software just bought out by Microsoft?
  14. bennt

    i cant stand my 74gb ratpor!

    Actually, isolating a HD makes quite a large difference with seek noise.
  15. I've been using chkdsk for years on perhaps a few hundred different computers and it has always worked the way I wanted and expected. If you are having recurring problems with the file system there must be something wrong, and it may not be a hardware problem with the drive itself. Drivers, overclocking, bad ATA or SATA cables (especially rounded ones), specific software, etc.
  16. There are a number of factors, but yes a better quality VGA cable should be better than a cheapo. But, it also depends on your video card, monitor, and other sources of interference (like power cords, fluorescent lights, etc. etc.). For my multimedia PC in the living room which is hooked up to the TV, I also have a long VGA extension that drops through the floor, runs about 15 feet across the room, and then back up on the other side where I have a monitor on the dining table. My old 17" crt monitor worked okay with a home-made VGA cable, with only a bit of ghosting. When I hooked a 15" LCD up to the same cable, it didn't even detect a signal. So I bought a decent quality premade 50' VGA cable and even the LCD works perfectly with no apparent degredation in quality.
  17. bennt

    Reliable servers

    We've standardized on Supermicro servers, and they have been working extremely well for us. We don't like using brands like Dell, Compaq, HP, IBM because they are finicky about using proprietary components and usually cost more for similar specs. Supermicro quality is top notch, and they have good tech support. If you want to stick with one of the big brands, I'd lean towards Dell, but that is just personal preference.
  18. bennt

    LCD monitor refresh rates

    You paint a pretty grim picture, but most of it is valid. However, some of the issues you have are more problematic on laptops specifically, and not necessarily true for desktop LCD's. LCD's in laptops are designed for power savings, as the LCD screen is one of the biggest battery eaters. Desktop LCDs don't have that problem as they are plugged into the wall all the time. There are some other differences as well. For me, desktop graphics is my number one priority, with gaming and DVD secondary, and I have yet to find a LCD that will do both reasonably well, without costing an arm and a leg. I'm really hoping that my trusty old 19" Viewsonic will last another 6 months or year, at which time I hope to have better choices.
  19. I'm assuming that is a typo in your post, but I just wanted to make sure you knew the Sony F717 doesn't have a 25x optical zoom lens, and I'm not aware of any camera with more than 12x optical zoom. The 717 has a 5x optical zoom lens.
  20. bennt

    LCD monitor refresh rates

    16 or 12ms is what you need. You can't go wrong with LCD's from Samsung or LG, but one brand I've found to be excellent value and good quality is Benq. If you have a DVI connector, you should get an LCD with one as well. Check their websites for models. Here in Canada, Benq has rebates on most models so check that out too.
  21. bennt

    LCD monitor refresh rates

    Actually, the refresh rate on an LCD is pretty much meaningless. The number you should be concerned about is the response time, measured in milliseconds. The range you will find will be between 30 and 12ms, with the lower numbers being better. If you do some gaming and/or watch movies, you should shoot for a screen with 16ms or better, otherwise you may notice some ghosting of images in high action scenes. However, if you are more interested in professional graphics, one of the most important specs is the viewing angle. The larger the viewing angle the better, as the colours displayed across the screen will be more consistent. There are some other factors as well, but you should identify your primary requirements and then we can narrow down the best LCD screens for you.
  22. www.dpreview.com is the best thorough, unbiased review site for digital cameras, and their forum is really good as well. www.steves-digicams.com is pretty good too, with www.dcresource.com coming in third (IMHO). You're list is pretty long, with a huge range of cameras and types. But, I think you should add one to that list, and that's the Panasonic FZ-20. Short of a dSLR, it is probably one of the most versatile cameras you can find. 12x optical zoom f2.8 throughout lens with image stabilization, 5Mp, flash hotshoe, lots of manual features if you want them, etc. You'll find reviews of the FZ-20 at dpreview and steves. Good luck!
  23. bennt

    Sysprep

    For systems that have the same or similar hardware, you just run sysprep, the system automatically shuts down, and then you can take an image of the drive and deploy. On bootup you'll be prompted for a serial number, machine name, etc. For systems that are different, it is going to require more prep prior to running sysprep, and may or may not work depending on how much things are different and what things you do prior. For this you'll want to read through a thread over at http://www.arstechnica.com. That should get you started and give you a pretty good idea of what is going to be required.
  24. bennt

    HDD partitioning & you

    1. Yes, 3. 2. Like to keep OS and programs completely seperate from data. C: OS and programs D: Data E: Temp storage When I setup computers for others, I usually keep it to just one partition for simplicity. For my own, I wouldn't ever have just one. Separating things makes it much easier to manage where things should be. Also, if I need to do a clean install, I can just format C: and reinstall OS and programs, and all my data is still there exactly where I left it. Of course, I still do a backup prior to a reinstall, but it still simplifies things and saves time.
  25. bennt

    Need exact model WD 80GB HDD

    I have a WD800JB-00CRA1 that might be available if none of the other offers pan out.