eltoro

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About eltoro

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  1. eltoro

    Storage Review Site Update

    I was very pleased to read this news. Good luck! Apart from all the above suggestions, any chance that you'll also review enterprise solutions (RAID systems, NetApps, EMC Clariions, etc...)?
  2. Well, I'm more optimistic now about getting this to work, but I guess I'll have to do some testing. Thank you all for the info! Tom
  3. @naro - which SAS card in which mobo? Thanks, Tom
  4. 1. With a G965/G33 motherboard that has an onboard graphic controller, which leaves the 16x PCI-E free, can I connect a 4x or 8x RAID controller to this slot? 2. What about a P965 motherboard's (like the Asus P5B Deluxe) secondary 16x slot (4x electrical)? Can I connect an 8x RAID controller to this slot? Will it know to also work in 4x mode (like how the Adaptec 39160 (64bit PCI) is also compatible with PCI2.2 (32bit)? Thanks, Tom
  5. Hi, I have an Asus P4P800 mobo. This mobo has the none RAID version of the ICH5 south bridge. When I try to install any version of the Intel Application Accelerator newer than 2.3 (which AFAIK too old for ICH5), I get an error message telling me this version (any 3.x +) is only meant for the ICH5R based boards. Does this means that I have no other option than to make do with the Intel INF (which is only a cosmetic driver and not a real one)? Does anybody know of a better solution? P.S. - I'm pretty sure some of you will claim IAA has no benifit other than RAID configuration. Thanks. Tom
  6. From what I know it is fixable for the P4C800 with just a BIOS update.
  7. Well, if your mobo is from an old batch, it could be that the bios version is too old, and does not have the Prescot compatibility yet. Even though the fact that your computer has actually made most of the post process (as it seems by the devices that powered up), and such a thing may hint that the CPU compability is not the issue (cause usually the PC wouldn't power at all, except for the on led), still, it might be a strange half compatible situation (with the CPU). I suggest: 1. Take some of the none critical post components out and try to power it up, then add them one by one and check for the component of stops the boot. 2. Try to boot it with a Northwood CPU, and then update the bios to the latest revision (1016), then replace the Northwood with the Prescot. If the PC won't boot with a Northwood CPU, the of course Prescot compatibility is NOT the main issue or not the issue at all. Good luck!
  8. eltoro

    Ibm Gxp Fiasco Secrets Revealed !

    Buzz - I totally agree, and that's why they should be bashed. A bad product here and there is not a reason to leave a manufacturer, but finding out how they continue to push their crapy product into the market even after they found out how crapy it is, is unforgiving!! Please based a lot of sensitive and important data on these drives long after IBM found what a high failure chance these drives have. I'm not talking gaming rigs here, but many work computers, where a lot of my engineers lost many work hours due to these failures...arrrrrrgggg !! I say f*** them!! And maybe it's interesting to point out at this occasion, but lately I found IBM to stink in other areas too. I was used to buy replacement ThinkPad batteries from their lab, which was cheaper than the regular retailers, but a month ago they decided to raise the price to more than 2 times the original price ?!?! Also, I wanted to purchase a 4th year warranty extension for a X230 server, and found out that it cost around $2000, which is about 50% of the server's price !!!! Something bad is brewing at IBM.
  9. eltoro

    Ibm Gxp Fiasco Secrets Revealed !

    Buzz - I totaly agree, and that;s why they should be bashed. A bad product here and there is not a reason to leave a manufacturer, but finding out how they continue to push their crapy product into the market even after they found out how crapy it is, is unforgiven!! Please based a lot of sensetive and important data on these drives long after IBM found what a high failure chance these drives have. I'm not talking gaming rigs here, but many work computers, where a lot of my engineers lost many work hours due to these failures...arrrrrrgggg !! I say f*** them!! And maybe it's interersting to point out at this ocasuin, but lately I found IBM to stink in other areas too. I was used to buy replacement ThinkPad batteries from their lab, which was cheaper than the regular retailers, but a month ago they decided to raise the price to more than 2 times the original price ?!?! Also, I wanted to purchase a 4th year warranty extension for a X230 server, and found out that it cost around $2000, which is about 50% of the server's price !!!! Something bad is brewing at IBM.
  10. eltoro

    Ibm Gxp Fiasco Secrets Revealed !

    HEY!!! how does this thread changed from IBM bashing to a stupid statistical argument?
  11. We'll, this seems authentic, and the details are nothing short of sensational !!! Read a scan version of the Maximum PC article in the following PDF: http://www.sheller.com/PDF/2004.01.09_Maximum_P1.pdf Taken from http://www.techreport.com/ : start quote -------------------------------- The possibility of serious reliability problems with certain of IBM's GXP-series hard drives has been well documented. High failure rates may have forced IBM's decision to sell its hard drive business to Hitachi, and anecdotal evidence has been overwhelming, spawning a massive thread that will not die here at TR, as over a thousand posts have rolled in over time detailing users' experiences with drive failures, failures of replacement drives, and struggles to get IBM to honor its warranties. The fiasco led to the filing of a class-action lawsuit against IBM on behalf of GXP failure victims. However, IBM has consistently denied unusually high failure rates on its GXP drives. Now, the law firm behind the suit, Sheller Ludwig & Badey, has updated its news page about the case (thanks Lo Yuk Fai) with a PDF version of a bombshell report from the Watchdog section of Maximum PC magazine's February issue. (Reprinted without permission?) The report is based on IBM e-mails and documents made available recently by a California court in connection with the class-action suit. The Maximum PC folks have dug up some sensational info in these documents, including internal IBM discussions revealing failure rates 10 times as high as competing products from other manufacturers, an apparent determination to address the problem through marketing denials rather than manufacturing changes, and a decision to sell a batch of faulty drives into distribution (and thus to consumers) after its rejection by a larger customer due to high failure rates. These practices seem to have raised significant concern inside IBM, based on excerpts from internal communications. A sample: "We have woven a story based upon half truths and misinformation that now places IBM in a position that is almost untenable." In short, this is one case where the anecdotal evidence, which is all we had at the time we first reported on this story, proved to be pointing us in the right direction. IBM was quite apparently engaging in a pattern of deception and knowingly shipping faulty products to customers while hiding behind rhetoric about standard industry failure rates and the like. Obviously, IBM's decision to bail out of the hard drive business was an indicator that GXP failures were a serious problem. Now, thanks to the class-action suit, we seem to be learning the truth. Let's hope the court sees fit to punish IBM and reward consumers appropriately. -------------------------------- end quote Amazing!!! (in my company we had to replaced ~80% of the 30GB 75GXP drives, and ~50% of the 15GB 75GXP, and 41GB 60GXP !!!)
  12. casa - a 2gb module from Kingston is listed at around $1000 in their site!!! Paying so much more for the RAM doesn't worth recovering this amount of lost ram, especially when I take into account that 3.5gb would p[robably be enough for this server use (running moderate size chip simulations, fitting, etc...kind of tools). For its price, this server does its job pretty well. Thanks guys!!! Tom
  13. Chewy509 - I'm running Windows 2000 Server SP4. LidlessEye - I suspect they are, but not sure. Kingston KVR333X64C25/1G module's datasheet: http://www.valueram.com/datasheets/KVR333X64C25_1G.pdf Can you understand from that if these are dual bank or not? Tom
  14. Hmmm, interesting... I'll play a little with the cards and see how that changes the situation. Thanks, Tom
  15. But why do I get to see this "missing" memory only in this situation and not in computers with less RAM? I have many PCs both at the company I work at (as MIS) and at home, with varied RAM configurations, but apart from situations where the display card is onboard, and uses part of the main RAM as his own, I've never seen such a situation ?!?! Something in the back of my memory (no pan intended) rings a bell about a "real" RAM limit (address space) of around 3.5GB (which is apposed to the "known" limit of 4GB). Apart from asking Asus' support, any other suggestion?