reader50

Member
  • Content count

    66
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by reader50

  1. The 03 or 04 part is the series number, it gives an indication of density and possibly power efficiency. Toshiba's 05 series has just hit the markets, with 04 still going strong. 03 is an older design today. I don't know what the G or D stands for.
  2. If it's software RAID, you're all good. The hardware will see the drives as individuals. I've seen Raptors used in softraid before. Assuming it isn't software RAID, what controller are you using?
  3. It's been a couple years since we reached 2TB in the 2.5"/9.5mm form factor. I know there's a Toshiba 3TB, and a Seagate SMR 4TB, both in 15mm. Both have been out for over a year. I take my video library with me on vacations, so capacity is more important than speed. Any rumors of 9.5mm drives coming that are bigger than 2 TB?
  4. OK, found a Toshiba 8TB for sale. Actual picture, and the listing claims 7 already sold. http://www.ebay.com/itm/371841480025 However, it's an MG05ACA800E enterprise drive. I don't recall anyone announcing this drive. The 8TB MN announced in this story is the MN05ACA800. Did Toshiba ship the MG 8TB without an announcement?
  5. It's about time. They were stuck at 6TB while everyone else has 10 and HGST has announced (but not shipped) 12TB. The specs and other materials do not identify the platter counts. Bottom screw locations imply the 6 and 8 use at least six platters each. Any word on availability?
  6. I detect a lawsuit happening. WD's SanDisk Skyhawk sounds a lot like Seagate's SkyHawk Surveillance drives. Which hit the market a good while earlier. Edit: I see that great minds think alike.
  7. For a 500 GB drive I would not bother. Even in 2.5", sizes top out at 5 TB and SSDs are slowly exterminating the 500 size.
  8. Apple waits until they're 7 years old - product support laws in California. You're supported until early 2018. Even then, later OSes won't deliberately break. Apple just won't test them on your machine before release.
  9. I've developed the impression all inexpensive Seagate 8TB drives are SMR. They're cagey about it - I pulled the data sheet on the 8TB Backup Plus above. It didn't give away if it was SMR or PMR.
  10. Article typo: Spindle Speed (RPM): 200
  11. Huh. And I *did* read that part.
  12. In the last graph (128K throughput) the vertical label is KB/sec. The SkyHawk's numbers range from 364,723 to 462,498 KB/sec. Or 364 MB/s to 462 MB/s. But Seagate's specs near the beginning of the article claim a max sustained throughput of 210 MB/s. Cache might speed things up, but this much of an increase seems doubtful. I'm guessing the numbers are really Bytes/sec, or is the SkyHawk cache as effective as shown?
  13. @milesaway, I thought you used kilometers in Canada. Oh right, this is about a new spammobile with low mileage. I'll invest by not clicking your link.
  14. I always enjoy these stats releases. Wish they'd add more Toshiba and WD drives to the mix to fill out the data. Even if they can't buy the drives 1200 at a time.
  15. Is anyone going to fix the review typo I pointed out? Figured my post would be obvious.
  16. Interesting drive mechanism. I've never seen this config before.
  17. Based on the Backblaze stats, 3 TB drives have been unusually unreliable. Except 3 TB drives from HGST. It sounds like you're running without a backup, and have gotten lucky so far. Suggest upgrading to a pair of 4 TB drives, with a periodic backup script that clones the primary drive to the 2nd one. It's not ideal, but far better than what you have now - prayer and your good looks.
  18. One would assume 7200 RPM, especially with helium. WD marketing to hide the RPM is one of my pet peeves. Is anyone else getting tired of an HD color for every season? They only need 3 grades (low-5400, medium-7200, high-7200+heavier frame). Other characteristics like retry-policy for RAID use could be set in software or via jumpers.
  19. Yes, internals are more convenient. And it's about time for an upgrade, but I haven't heard anything. Checking newegg, the largest 9.5mm internal is the same 2TB I bought a year ago. The largest SSD is 2TB. SSDs are about to pass laptop HDs in capacity as well as speed. With SSD prices falling faster than HDs, they need to introduce larger HDs or write off the laptop HD market. SSDs have already exterminated HDs below 250 GB, and 500 GB is under pressure. I'm hoping for a bigger 2.5" to upgrade to within the next couple months.
  20. They're withholding the prices as a health-safety issue. You're welcome.
  21. Are the middle screw holes in the standard positions? The one pic looks promising, but I couldn't tell for sure. And the bottom wasn't visible of course.
  22. I'm assuming it is SMR, but is there any confirmation? The "Max Sustainable Transfer Rate: 230MB/s" is presumably on large sequential reads.
  23. I thought the Hold Separate thing was a condition imposed by Europe, along with the required assets sale to Toshiba. Part of maintaining three major HD manufacturers, and a quasi-fourth.
  24. Solid backups generally involve an off-site element. So have a regular backup against drive failure or file corruption or mistakenly deleted file. This backup can be beside your system or router. A 2nd backup, stored in a fire/flood safe, or perhaps in a bank safe deposit box. But a local safe might get taken by the burglars too, and there's the meteor problem. Or use a cloud service like Backblaze that runs in the background. Use encryption to keep the NSA guessing. The more important your data, the more likely you should use all of the above.
  25. Some of the choices look odd. With SSDs taking most of the market below 1 TB, they released new 500 GB drives. And the L200 topping out at 1 TB doesn't compete with the 2.5" Samsung/Seagate 2 TB. I'd expect new HDs to have a strong focus on capacity. That's their main competitive advantage. SSD prices are falling more aggressively, so even smallish HDs won't be price competitive for long after they become available.