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Toshiba Announces the MG04 Series of 5TB 3.5-Inch Enterprise HDDs Disc

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#1 Brian

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 09:32 AM

 

Toshiba has announced the next generation of high-capacity 3.5-inch form factor enterprise HDDs, the MG04 series. The MG04 series is engineered for midline and nearline business critical workloads and is the industry’s first enterprise capacity category models that support industry standard 4K Advanced Format sector technologies. It also supports persistent write cache technology, which improves both performance and reliability. Additionally, the series is specifically designed for the high-capacity demands of mid-tier servers and cloud application workloads as well as for capacity-optimized data center storage systems that benefit from high capacity per spindle.

 
Toshiba Announces the MG04 Series of 5TB 3.5-Inch Enterprise HDDs
 

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#2 [ETA]MrSpadge

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 03:21 PM

What's this persistent write cache? An SSD cache or different firmware settings? In the latter case I couldn't see it improving performance and reliability at the same time (otherwise it would already be used everywhere).

 

And I'm surprised these are running at 7.2k rpm! How are they doing it? The case sure looks to be full of platters. 5x1 TB or another 6 platter design, like Seagate announced?

 

MrS


#3 Brian

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 03:23 PM

These inquiries have been submitted to Toshiba. 


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#4 [ETA]MrSpadge

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 03:25 AM

Thanks! German ZDNet says they're 5x1 TB platter, with maximum transfer rate of 205 MB/s. No further details on persistent cache, though.

 

MrS


#5 Brian

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 09:01 AM

Here you go:

 

 

-          Persistent Write Cache means that data in the write cache not yet written to the media will “persist” through a sudden power loss event.

-          This is useful for Advanced Format drives supporting emulated 512 (512e) sectors.

-          A non-aligned write may result in a “read-modify-write” operation which requires an extra rotation of the disk to write the modified sector to the storage media.

-          In the event of a sudden power loss, the back EMF energy of the spindle motor is used to power the write data loss protection circuitry.

-          This is able to power the transfer of the RMW data to NV memory.

-          On power up, the RMW data is restored from the NV memory to the write cache and the RMW operation is completed.

-          This helps to avoid any inconsistency between write data the host has transferred and write data the drive has committed to the storage media.

-          Capacity increase is achieved by increasing the areal density by 25% (to 1TB/platter) vs. the prior generation (800GB/platter). 


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#6 [ETA]MrSpadge

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 04:43 PM

That's a quick response, very informative and quite a neat trick :)

Probably using the electrical spindle motor as generator to get enough power to flush the cache into non-volatile memory, which is probably flash for simplicity (this shouldn't be needed very often, so write cycles wouldn't be an issue). The NV memory would at most have to be as large as the DRAM cache, probably less.

 

MrS


#7 continuum

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 01:49 PM

Now when do we see reviews... *grins*


#8 Brian

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 03:33 PM

Toshiba isn't super quick, but we'll see. There will be more larger cap drives this year too, so that's a good sign. 


Brian

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