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Supermicro SuperStorage Server 2027R-AR24NV Discussion


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#1 Kevin OBrien

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 04:42 PM

The Supermicro SuperStorage Server AR24NV is a high-end storage system built around leading SAS3 12Gb/s technology. It offers seamless migration from SAS2 to SAS3 for SES-2 layer in terms of storage enclosure management, delivering performance that has the ability to realize the full potential of PCIe 3.0-enabled motherboards and SSD storage solutions. The 2027R-AR24NV is comprised of two main subsystems: the SC216A-R920LPB 2U 24-bay chassis and the Super X9DRH-iF-NV dual-processor serverboard. The main attraction though is an all-new 24-bay SAS3 12Gb/s backplane optimized for the latest generation of SSDs as well as an impressive 7 PCIe 3.0 slots to support a wide range RAID/HBA and networking interconnect options.

 

Supermicro SuperStorage Server 2027R-AR24NV


#2 MRFS

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 11:27 PM

>  The use cases get even more compelling for those wanting to reach into even more fringe waters with the support for NVDIMM.

 

I would prefer a better term than "fringe" and its somewhat negative connotation.

 

Perhaps "emerging trend now visible on the near horizon" :)

 

For those who are interested, we highly recommend the excellent webinar on

NVDIMMs by Jeff Chang, VP of Marketing and Business Development at AgigA Tech:

NVDIMM's - Persistence Pays

https://www.brightta...bcast/663/95329

 

 

Jeff and I had a lively exchange, after I shared some of my own ideas with him:

he was very generous with his replies.

 

Check it out!


#3 Brian

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 11:39 AM

We love the promise of NVDIMM but it's years away from any significant adoption. Too many compromises right now for anyone other than "fringe" use cases.

Brian

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Twitter - @StorageReview

 

#4 MRFS

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 03:54 PM

>  We love the promise of NVDIMM but it's years away from any significant adoption.

 

I honestly do not believe that "significant adoption" should be

one of the major criteria by which to evaluate NVDIMMs at the present time --

either the ones available now, nor the ones visible on the near horizon.

 

Imagine continuous improvements in DRAM densities, and

the ability to load an OS directly into DRAM, e.g. perhaps

in an upper-most address region.

 

Then, with NVDIMMs hosting that OS, the possibility of a

truly INSTANT ON computer comes that much closer to reality.

 

Sure, enhancements will need to be added to UEFI subsystems,

but that's one of UEFI's greatest attributes.

 

Consider a "FORMAT RAM" option in a UEFI menu

before running Windows Setup the very first time.

 

 

I'm thinking out loud here, but I do believe that functionality

as close as possible to an ON/OFF light switch is certainly

an ability worth pursuing:

 

Switch ON and the Windows Desktop appears in less than one second.

 

What's not to like?

 

 

We have an ASRock micro ATX motherboard which implements

an "Instant Boot" feature that does reach the Windows Desktop in about

10 seconds, but it requires 2 SHUTDOWNs to activate "sleep mode".

 

 

http://www.asrock.co...re/instantboot/


Brian,

 

We would LUV your comments after viewing Jeff Chang's webinar:  NVDIMM's:  Persistence Pays


#5 Kevin OBrien

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 08:02 PM

Well just to be fair, instant-on isn't a feature that would help any enterprise environment ;) Most servers enter duty and aren't turned off until power failure or eventual replacement.

 

As to quicker boot times, your luck if your new Dell or HP server goes from power on to booting VMware, Windows, Linux, etc in under 3-4 minutes even with the fastest storage behind it. They run so many pre-boot checks that the OS sitting inside RAM wouldn't help out.


#6 MRFS

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 10:39 AM

>  They run so many pre-boot checks that the OS sitting inside RAM wouldn't help out.

 

Very good point.


#7 mimi

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 08:11 PM

Im looking for new storage (this likes for me for its performance - maybe see it on yours tests).

I have a questions:

- in article you added (or changed by 3xadaptec in IT mode) to Supermicro in specification fileserver  2xAdaptec 81605ZQ? Why 2x? Canged  or added?

 

And what about if i need connect to them 1x external JBOD with 2x SAS connector? Must add next card with external connector?


#8 Kevin OBrien

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 09:46 PM

The Adaptec cards are cards we installed seperately in the file server (removing the LSI-based HBAs that were included). If you want to attach to an external JBOD or work with another configuration, you'd have to purchase a card for that purpose.


#9 mimi

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 10:50 PM

OK remove old card, but insert two card´s??

Maybe there was six cables (two on each card) - now we need three cables on each new adapter??


#10 Kevin OBrien

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 11:18 AM

It really depends on how you want your particular server setup. In our final build we have 16 drives (4 cables) connected to one card and 8 drives (2 cables) connected to another.


#11 hyc

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 12:10 PM

I've been waiting for NVDIMMs for 30-some years it seems, since I used to run an Atari ST with 4MB battery-backed RAM cartridge.

 

Instant-on isn't really an issue (though we pretty much had that, back in the ST/TT days) - today it's just about the OS page cache. PCIe SSDs still aren't as fast as the real memory bus, and the fewer times we have to make our data traverse that the better. For databases you always want fast writes, and the fastest write is the one you didn't need to execute (e.g., because it was in cache, and the block got overwritten by a subsequent update anyway). NVRAM inside disk controllers is still at the far end of the I/O bus from the CPU.

 

NVDIMMs offer the perfect solution - cache everything, don't ever worry about flushing data back to secondary storage unless the cache is actually full. If there's a power failure, after reboot just keep on going with the cache exactly as you last left it. The trick of course is that you need explicit BIOS support. At the very least, to make sure the POST memory test doesn't zero out all of your precious NVDIMMs just as they're reloading themselves with power being restored. And you also need explicit OS/kernel support, to use the cache structures as they already exist, instead of (again) just blindly initializing to zero on a reboot.

 

Whether NVDIMMs ever offer you instant-on is irrelevant. The real value, and the reason why you want these in servers, is perpetual high speed cache to mask whatever slowness of your HDDs or SSDs.


... and on the note of databases and RAM, this is what I've been working on these days http://symas.com/mdb/inmem/

 

It's a big deal for all the tech giants - Google, Facebook, Twitter, eBay, you name it. NVDIMMs can be salvation for them (with the correct database technology, of course) and a gold mine for the vendors who bring them to market first.





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