Jump to content


Photo

Reliability a premium


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 PJNanook

PJNanook

    Member

  • Member
  • 4 posts

Posted 05 April 2013 - 02:16 PM

I am a photographer looking for bare Hard drives. These will be used in a SATA dock and then stored offline for longer term storage. What drives should I choose? Looking at a balance of price and size. Reliability is the most important factor. I will be using drives in sets of two where they both have Identical information but stored in different locations. My live storage is on a mirror Raid.

Thanks,

Kevin

#2 dietrc70

dietrc70

    Member

  • Member
  • 104 posts

Posted 05 April 2013 - 03:28 PM

The warranty is a good indicator of the class of a hard drive. Drives with 5 year warranties are usually the best. I would get Western Digital Black's in your situation. They are often reasonably priced, and are quite reliable. Remember that most hard drives are not designed to be knocked around badly, so be sure to invest in fitted anti-static cases (the original shipping box could work) to store and transport them when they aren't mounted. Storing the RAW files in a checksumed format with built in recovery features (i.e. winrar with recovery features and file authentication, or proprietary backup software) would be a good idea to protect against possible bit rot during long storage.

I also suggest you look into on-line backup services. I am an amateur photographer, and use Crashplan to automatically backup my important data to their secure datacenters. Personal plans with unlimited data are very reasonably priced.

Edited by dietrc70, 05 April 2013 - 03:31 PM.

#3 PJNanook

PJNanook

    Member

  • Member
  • 4 posts

Posted 06 April 2013 - 12:52 PM

Thanks for the input. I have been leaning towards those drives and some Wiebetech (sp?) cases. I also do some backup on DVD. I will look into the cloud storage but have control issues on my images.


K

#4 FastMHz

FastMHz

    Member

  • Member
  • 400 posts

Posted 06 April 2013 - 02:12 PM

I don't trust the cloud at all. You might look into something like this for long term archival that you're in complete control of.

Production: Vishera 8350/32gb RAM/Dual SSD/VelociRaptor/Radeon 7750
Gaming: Phenom II 955/16gb RAM/SSD/VelociRaptor/Radeon 7950
Retro: K6-2 550/256mb RAM/160gb HDD/CompactFlash/3DFX/ATI AIW Pro/SB16/DB50XG
http://www.fastmhz.com

#5 Beenthere

Beenthere

    Member

  • Member
  • 178 posts

Posted 06 April 2013 - 03:09 PM

No offense intended but the length of the warranty does not imply better reliability. Maybe 10 years ago there was some validity to that theory when true enterprise quality HDDs existed but not since HDDs have became a commodity. The same is true of consumer grade SSDs. The price of the product has the extended warranty cost built in. Consumers have absolutely no means to know the reliability of any HDD or SSd other than if there is a high incident report on a specific model HDD/SSD. Other than that it's a crap shoot.

I also would not trust the cloud. The professionals that I know who need to archive lots of client data use DVDs.

Edited by Beenthere, 06 April 2013 - 03:11 PM.

#6 PJNanook

PJNanook

    Member

  • Member
  • 4 posts

Posted 06 April 2013 - 11:59 PM

I have been using DVDs. Just trying to get a little easier on the back up. While there does not seem to be a clear-cut solution, at least i am not alone in my confusion.

Kevin

#7 corrsfan

corrsfan

    Member

  • Member
  • 1 posts

Posted 07 April 2013 - 05:01 AM

i think the op has this nailed, but the only thing id suggest is having dropped a bare drive while messing with a dock, is that that is the weakest point in the process. i lost a bare drive that way.

why not leave the redundant drives where these are, so these are less likely to be dropped/damaged in transit, but transport only a copy of the changes on a different media like a big usb flash drive, or even a 512gb ssd (for example) that way once written to you could drop these as much as you like. the only issue is that you'd need to introduce some sort of checksuming into your actual backups to ensure these are still all consistent as expected.

#8 PJNanook

PJNanook

    Member

  • Member
  • 4 posts

Posted 07 April 2013 - 02:04 PM

I have been buying additional RAIDS preconfigured. Was looking at bare drives with a Newer Technology Voyager dock. I have amassed quite a bit of data over the years and now is growing exponentially since my main camera is 36 Megapixels. The BluRay version of the M-Disc (out this summer) looks promising. (Thanks FastMHZ for the lead)


Kevin

#9 dietrc70

dietrc70

    Member

  • Member
  • 104 posts

Posted 07 April 2013 - 10:36 PM

Thanks for the input. I have been leaning towards those drives and some Wiebetech (sp?) cases. I also do some backup on DVD. I will look into the cloud storage but have control issues on my images.


K

FYI, just speaking of Crashplan, the data is an encrypted 448bit both ways and on their servers, and you have the options:

1. To use minimal security (what I use), with one password for the account and the encryption key, which lets Crashplan reset your password if you lose it.
2. The key is encrypted under your own, secure password. If you forget it, Crashplan cannot get the data back for you, since only you know the password to unlock the key.
3. You provide your own key, the data is encrypted at your PC, and Crashplan just stores the encrypted data, with no way to decrypt it.

Security is very important to these services; they aren't convenience services like Skydrive or Dropbox, but are intended from the get-go for secure backup. I think you should give it a try, at least. I've been extremely impressed with how well designed the software is. It uses block level deduplication, so a small change in a 1GB Photoshop file only requires a few seconds to backup.

The fact that higher-end consumer drives aren't built like the $800-$1000+ SCSI drives of yesteryear doesn't mean that they aren't quite a lot better than the low to midrange consumer drives. Most of my WD RE's have been in service for more than 5 years and show no sign of giving me an excuse to upgrade my RAID arrays...

Edited by dietrc70, 07 April 2013 - 10:37 PM.

#10 [ETA]MrSpadge

[ETA]MrSpadge

    Member

  • Member
  • 724 posts

Posted 08 April 2013 - 04:03 PM

Since you'd be using the drives for long-term storage in the powered off state and you'd be using 2 identical ones and your original data is on the RAID as long as the transfer is not complete.. well, I woulnd't worry about the reliability of these drives too much. Not sure how long it takes you to fill 4 TB (what a nightmare to backup this on DVD.. ouch!), but it sounded like these backup drives wouldn't be powered on for too long.

Regarding the cloud: I've got all my important stuff backed up in Skydrive, automatically encrypted before it leaves my PC using Cloudfogger. Not as professional as Crashplan, but I can't complain if it's free. Looking forward to do the same with Mega and less important data :D

MrS

#11 mike2h

mike2h

    Member

  • Member
  • 258 posts

Posted 18 June 2013 - 02:37 PM

bd? 25 gig disks are finally cost effective . a 25 spindle of 50 gig verbatim(my fave brand) can be had for $180.not sure what re-write disks cost.



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users