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LSI 8271-8iCC setup


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#1 evcass

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 12:39 PM

I'm looking to add a RAID setup to my home system. I think I've decided on the 8271-8iCC with the LSIiBBU09 battery backup, using a RAID50. The parition will primarily be used for video rendering on a Windows 7x64 system currently with 16GB of RAM and an overclocked i7-3770K @ 4.7GHz.

The case fan specs are here, I have all possible fans connected so I hope that will be adequate airflow: http://azzatek.com/c...0-techspec.html

I want to use a pair of these Icy Dock stations to house up to 8 2.5" drives in a pair of 5.25" bays: http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817994095

Are all SAS/SATA cables the same quality, or should I consider specific brands? The included 1 meter cables will be much longer than I will need, is there any place where I can find them shorter for wire management?

I don't think I want to pay for 8 SSD's (I already use a 240GB SSD for my OS & application partitions), what 2.5" HDD's will be the best combination of performance, price & reliability?

Any specific suggestions for stripe or block size when creating the partition?

Thanks!

#2 dietrc70

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 06:16 AM

Just a few suggestions:

(Did you mistype your RAID card model number?)

1. Unless you really need screaming random access speeds (unlikely for video rendering), I think you should consider 3.5 inch SAS or enterprise SATA disks instead. They are far less expensive per gigabyte.

2. If you are serious enough about data integrity to get a BBU hardware RAID card, then overclocking it to that extent strikes me as a bad idea.

3. If write speeds are important, then consider RAID 10. I think it's the best choice for personal workstation RAID where write speeds are as important as read speeds.

4. Supermicro also makes excellent hard drive racks.

5. All cables are not equal. For a system like yours you should only use LSI or Adaptec (i.e enterprise) branded cables.

6. A good case should have cable management areas to thread the longer cables, but you can also buy 0.5 meter LSI cables.

#3 evcass

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 08:57 AM

Just a few suggestions:

(Did you mistype your RAID card model number?)

1. Unless you really need screaming random access speeds (unlikely for video rendering), I think you should consider 3.5 inch SAS or enterprise SATA disks instead. They are far less expensive per gigabyte.

2. If you are serious enough about data integrity to get a BBU hardware RAID card, then overclocking it to that extent strikes me as a bad idea.

3. If write speeds are important, then consider RAID 10. I think it's the best choice for personal workstation RAID where write speeds are as important as read speeds.

4. Supermicro also makes excellent hard drive racks.

5. All cables are not equal. For a system like yours you should only use LSI or Adaptec (i.e enterprise) branded cables.

6. A good case should have cable management areas to thread the longer cables, but you can also buy 0.5 meter LSI cables.



Whoops, I meant a 9271-8iCC.

1. That's what I meant, traditional spindles instead of SSD. Right now I'd like to pick a card (and I think I did) which is pretty robust; I'm very impressed by our IBM M5015s in the enterprise. I do want high density though so I was hoping to mitigate the 2.5 performance penalty (vs. an equivalent 3.5) by using more 2.5's.
2. I've read that if the parity is calculated on the RAID card instead of using the CPU, then it shouldn't matter about overclocking?
3. Thanks
4. I just looked at the SuperMicro mobile racks. Those that fit in a 1x5.25" drive bay appear to only support 3gbps speeds, and I don't know if the multi-bay enclosures would physically fit in my tool-less drive bays. The Icy Dock supports 6gbps.
5. Thanks
6. Oh it has fine cable management options already. I'll try the included cables first.

#4 continuum

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 08:29 PM

Data still flows into/out of the CPU at some point tho, so if you need utmost stability I would not be overclocking.

RAID50 might get you better performance than a single RAID5, but the lack of parity protection during rebuilds scares me.... RAID10 might be a safer bet if you need the performance. Also exactly how much performance do you need? An older Areca ARC-1680 with 6xWD RE4 in RAID6 still gets more than 400MB/sec writes sustained, so you really may not need as many spindles as you think, either. A LSI 9271-8i is a brand-new modern card vs. the several generations-old ARC-1680 so it should take even better advantage of whatever disks you use.



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