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INTEL OR SAMSUNG, WHICH IS MOST RELIABLE


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#1 demto

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:14 AM

I need to buy a new ssd as my existing ssd has failed.

I am primarily interested in reliability over everything else. My motherboard is SATA 11 but it doesn't bother me if the ssd is SATA 11 or SATA 111. I know I wont get the full speed from a SATA 111 ssd but this doesn't bother me either. Reliability is my main concern.

I know there are usually exceptions to every rule but I have done some research and Intel and Samsung seem to come out tops on reliability. I know that there are plenty of other manufacturers out there that make ssd's but I have decided to buy from one or other of these manufacturers. The question is which one.

Lets imagine it has to be Intel or Samsung.
Lets imagine capacity and cost are not a problem
Lets imagine it doesn't necessarily have to be the latest offerings from either manufacturer. As long as it can still be bought that is ok.

Which manufacturer and which model would you buy and what would be your reasoning for your choice ? I would really appreciate your opinion.

#2 mike2h

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 11:08 AM

from everything I have read and my own limited experience you can just pick your capacity of either brand and find the cheapest one for that size. personally I would go with the Samsung 840 pro(going to be my next buy).

#3 demto

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 11:19 AM

mike2h.... thanks for your reply.

#4 continuum

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:28 PM

Most proven track record at the moment seems to be the Intel 520 Series and Intel 330 Series, unless you can find a Samsung 830 Series still in stock somewhere.

The newer ones (Intel 525, Intel 335, Samsung 840 and Samsung 840 Pro) are too new for end-users to have an established track record.

#5 demto

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 02:57 PM

Continuum... Thanks for your reply and I agree about track record.

#6 FastMHz

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 04:28 PM

I love my Samsung 830!

Production: Vishera 8350/32gb RAM/Dual SSD/VelociRaptor/Radeon 7750
Gaming: Phenom II 955/16gb RAM/SSD/VelociRaptor/Radeon 7950
Retro: K6-2 550/256mb RAM/160gb HDD/CompactFlash/3DFX/ATI AIW Pro/SB16/DB50XG
http://www.fastmhz.com

#7 demto

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 08:39 PM

FastMHz... Thanks for your reply. How long have you had your Samsung 830, and have you had any problems with it.

#8 demto

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:25 PM

I have done some research and ordered a Samsung 830 240gb. Unfortunately it cost more than either of the latest equivalent offerings from Intel or Samsung but I think its worth the extra.

NO, its not the latest and greatest but IMO it has a major advantage over their current domestic offerings.
What it has going for it is a very good track record of reliability going back a couple of years or more. You won't find may people complaining of problems or failure.

As both Intel and Samsung have brought out new models recently they do not have a proven track record yet. Never mind what the manufacturers may claim about reliability its proof that counts and they just don't have enough domestic user proof yet. Maybe in a year or so but not now. So for me its reliability first and while I know there are usually exceptions to any rule I am trying the best I can to avoid a a repeat of what happened to my Vertex 11 after 7 months use.

Thank you to those that replied to my original post.

#9 FastMHz

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:15 PM

Zero problems with my 830, had it for about 6 months I suppose.

Production: Vishera 8350/32gb RAM/Dual SSD/VelociRaptor/Radeon 7750
Gaming: Phenom II 955/16gb RAM/SSD/VelociRaptor/Radeon 7950
Retro: K6-2 550/256mb RAM/160gb HDD/CompactFlash/3DFX/ATI AIW Pro/SB16/DB50XG
http://www.fastmhz.com

#10 Beenthere

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 12:48 AM

I'm late here but... virtually no one here or elsewhere has enough statistical data to even come close to knowing what the top ten most reliable consumer grade SSDs are let alone the top two. There simply is no way to obtain any legitimate statistical data on SSDs or even HDDs to make an informed purchasing decision regarding "reliability". It's unfortunate but it's reality and it's not about to change any time soon. When it comes to SSD reliability it's a crap shoot. You simply get what you get and it's not always good or even consistent amongst models let alone amongst brands.

Many people base their reliability or compatibility rating on a sample of a few units, which is statistically insignificant in most cases. If there are a lot of reports of drive failures that would tend to have more validity than reports of non-issues. People who don't experience an SSD issue believe there are none and those who do experience an SSD issue know they exists. None of us know to what degree the reliability or compatibility issues exist, but SSDs are still going thru growing pains with design, NAND and construction techniques changing almost weekly. Thus it's no surprise that reliability is not high on the list of SSD assets.

For those who care about an SSD warranty, I'd get the warranty terms and conditions in writing - typically at the manufacturer's website. Read them carefully as you might be quite surprised at what they state and what limitations exist.

#11 Bytebite

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 03:49 AM

I also have a Samsung 830 SSD and love it, but like every other component, even the 830 can break. So please just do backups and a hardware failure will not cause many issues, only some hassle.

#12 demto

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 05:29 AM

FastMHz, Thanks for your info.

Beenthere, I wanted to speed up my computer and suspected the hard drive was holding things back so I treated myself to a ssd. The ssd did the trick and now I don't want to go back to a slower computer.
Yes, i agree there is no proof that ssd's are reliable in the real long term. Hhd's have been around many years and ssd's havn't. Ssd's are a party proven technology and that's all there is to it.

But having experienced the speed of a ssd I don't want to go back to a hdd even though my Vertex 11 failed. OCZ have sent me a new Vertex 11 under the guarantee but I will not use it. I have decided to stick my toes in the water and try again but with the Samsung 830 which has a good name for reliability. Whether I will be lucky the second time round we will see, I hope so. In the end there is no absolute guarantee about these things so each of us has to make our own decision.

#13 demto

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 05:32 AM

I also have a Samsung 830 SSD and love it, but like every other component, even the 830 can break. So please just do backups and a hardware failure will not cause many issues, only some hassle.


Thanks for your reply and I agree that backups are important

#14 [ETA]MrSpadge

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 10:14 AM

What Beenthere said was not to stay away from SSDs (as far as I understood), but rather that we won't get it any more accurate than "nothing to complain about with the 830, although others are great too". And that even the SSD with the best track record.. which may be 0.54% annualized failure rate, compared to the 2nd one woth 0.60.. can fail, just as well as HDDs fail, and you need to backup important stuff anyway. So apart from not choosing a known troublesome drive (Vertex II didn't shine here) there will very likely be no difference for the individual between the "most reliable SSD" and "number 2".

BTW: it's the roman letters I, II, III etc. and not 1, 11, 111! I got what you meant, but it look's really disturbing to me.

MrS

#15 vectrexer

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 04:45 PM

Been using the Samsung 830 256GB for about a year. Nice and fast and never a hiccup.

Been using the Patriot Torqx 256GB (PFZ256GS25SSDR) since November 2009. Yup, the ones that have the 10 year warranty. The first few firmware updates were a pain. But then you could say the same for every SSD at that time. I have not performed a firmware update in over two years and they still run fine today. If somewhat slower than most SSDs. (still faster than any hard drive!) I am almost looking forward to the day they fail in July of 2019. I would expect a free capacity upgrade will come in the process. :-). We'll also have better SSD's (or whatever) when that time rolls around.

For all SSDs I would like to see some kind of message displayed during the firmware update process indicating whether or not the data is expected to be invalid after the firmware update. I would still backup my data! But it would be nice to know when the backup need is a "must", instead of a "probably, maybe". Moving the whole experience closer to what we see in the hard drive firmware update area.

Edited by vectrexer, 22 March 2013 - 04:49 PM.

- Vectrexer

#16 demto

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 05:32 PM

For all SSDs I would like to see some kind of message displayed during the firmware update process indicating whether or not the data is expected to be invalid after the firmware update. I would still backup my data! But it would be nice to know when the backup need is a "must", instead of a "probably, maybe". Moving the whole experience closer to what we see in the hard drive firmware update area.
[/quote]

I AGREE

#17 [ETA]MrSpadge

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 03:05 AM

For all SSDs I would like to see some kind of message displayed during the firmware update process indicating whether or not the data is expected to be invalid after the firmware update.

To be fair, most firms adress this at least in the beginning of the release notes / readme. However, people should be required to read these, so I agree: the actual flashing tools should display this very important information. Although I think they already display a general disclaimer, saying you should always backup your stuff anyway, so they may think a more specific message woulnd't be needed. But this is getting off-topic..

MrS

#18 erb

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 07:01 PM

I need to buy a new ssd as my existing ssd has failed.

I am primarily interested in reliability over everything else. My motherboard is SATA 11 but it doesn't bother me if the ssd is SATA 11 or SATA 111. I know I wont get the full speed from a SATA 111 ssd but this doesn't bother me either. Reliability is my main concern.

I know there are usually exceptions to every rule but I have done some research and Intel and Samsung seem to come out tops on reliability. I know that there are plenty of other manufacturers out there that make ssd's but I have decided to buy from one or other of these manufacturers. The question is which one.

Lets imagine it has to be Intel or Samsung.
Lets imagine capacity and cost are not a problem
Lets imagine it doesn't necessarily have to be the latest offerings from either manufacturer. As long as it can still be bought that is ok.

Which manufacturer and which model would you buy and what would be your reasoning for your choice ? I would really appreciate your opinion.



Get two of whatever and RAID1.

BTW, you meant SATA II, SATA III.

#19 demto

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 05:02 AM

[quote name='erb' timestamp='1364256096' post='279818']
Get two of whatever and RAID1.

BTW, you meant SATA II, SATA III.
[/quot

Now that you have corrected my grammer how about answering the question.

#20 [ETA]MrSpadge

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 04:00 AM

He already did: for guaranteed reliability you'd need at least RAID 1. Otherwise both can fail, irregardless of the small differences between the individual brands / drives.

MrS

#21 cbrworm

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 07:39 PM

I have had great success with the Samsung 830 series and the old Intel G2 and 330 series drives. I have also had good luck (so far) with the Sandisk Extreme drives. I have had mixed results with PQI and Crucial/Micron C200 & C300 drives, and some others. We have thousands of the Intel and Micron/Crucial drives deployed and hundreds of the 830, PQI and Apacer drives. We have never had an Intel or Samsung drive fail. We have only deployed a handful of the sandisk drives so far. We have not deployed any of the Samsung 840 series drives yet - currently we have the 830 and Intel certified and will stick with them until it is no longer available.

#22 demto

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 06:39 AM

CBRWORM, thanks for your message.

As I have said previously reliability is essential to me a good track record is an important
pointer to the most reliable SSDs. I chose the Samsung 830 for this reason. I know that there is no
absolute reliability guarantee with the 830 or any other part of the computer for that matter but I feel
I have done my best.



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