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#1 demto

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 07:16 AM

I fitted a OCZ Vertex 2 SSD to my desktop last July.

It worked fine for 7 months but has now died. It is currently being checked out by OCZ who may well replace it.
I have now found out that OCZ does not have the highest reputation for reliability and even if they do replace it I
would be reluctant to use the replacement.

So I am looking at alternative makes of SSDs that have a good reputation for reliability. Intel and Samsung seem to be tops.

My question is this. Are Intel SSDs OK to fit in computer which does not have an Intel motherboard and processor. My PC has a Gigabyte motherboard with a AMD processor. In other words are Intel SSDs selective about which motherboard they work with or are they basically "universal"

Edited by demto, 09 March 2013 - 07:18 AM.

#2 Brian

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 10:33 AM

SSDs don't care about the mobo. The good news on your V2 though is that OCZ likely doesn't have any more in inventory, you'll probably get a V3 instead ;) I'd feel okay about a V3 or newer.

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#3 demto

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 11:03 AM

[quote name='Brian' timestamp='1362843212' post='279584']
SSDs don't care about the mobo. The good news on your V2 though is that OCZ likely doesn't have any more in inventory, you'll probably get a V3 instead ;) I'd feel okay about a V3 or newer.
[/qu

#4 demto

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 11:04 AM

SSDs don't care about the mobo. The good news on your V2 though is that OCZ likely doesn't have any more in inventory, you'll probably get a V3 instead ;) I'd feel okay about a V3 or newer.



Thanks for the info. Demto

#5 sub.mesa

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 12:59 PM

Your motherboard indeed doesn't matter. But you were also asking about more reliable SSDs. Be aware that only two consumer SSDs are inherently safe: Intel 320 and Crucial M500. These have sufficient protections like power-safe capacitors and RAID4 bitcorrection on the NAND, both are crucial at preventing corruption of your data. SSDs powered by other controllers, like Crucial M4, Samsung 830/840 and Sandforce SSDs like OCZ are inherently unsafe. Basically, they are designed to fail or become corrupt on sudden power loss. About 90% of all consumer SSDs fail due to software issues; not because the hardware is faulty.

#6 demto

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 03:35 PM

I looked on Intel's website. Seems the 320 series were introduced a couple of years or so ago. They dont seem to be pushing it now. I am not very up on SSD's but there is no mention of a Sata connection with this series. Not sure if they have SATA or not and would they connect to a Sata motherboard in a PC.

The more you go into this SSD jungle the more confused you can become.

At first I thought "I want to speed up my PC" ..Then I heard about SSDs and how quick they were and silent too!
Then I thought "no moving parts so they can't wear out, can't go wrong, must last a long time, I want one."

Looked up a few reviews which were all about specifications and no mention anywhere about reliability OCZ Vertex2
came out well in reviews so I bought one. RIGHT it did speed up my computer. WRONG.. They can fail, and it did.

So now I am looking at reliability as number one priority. and again confusion. Are older versions of SSD,s more reliable than current versions. I was beginning to hanker after an Intel 335 but now it seems this isn't a good idea. HELP

#7 demto

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 04:08 PM

I checked again on Intel's site and Yes the 320 series does have a sata connection, so it will fit my computer.

The rest of my reply still stands.

#8 demto

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Posted 15 March 2013 - 08:21 AM

INTERESTING...I checked the prices of the 320, 335, and 520

The 320 160gb costs more than either the 335 180gb or the 520 180gb

QUESTION...Is this because retailers paid more for the 320 in the first place and don't want to sell them off cheaply or is the 320 basically a more reliable ssd and therefore worth a premium price. The extra speed of your 335 or 520 will count for nothing if it has just failed. For me reliability is paramount.

Perhaps sub.mesa has a point about the 320. I am no expert so I would appreciate your comments.

#9 continuum

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 07:21 PM

Intel 320-series prices have gone up because supply has basically evaporated. The 335 and 520 are much more plentiful in the channel.

#10 rugger

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:53 AM

First of all, in the field, there have been plenty of firmware problems with the 320, so it isn't really the shining beacon of reliability that people expected.

In any case, you are much better off having a good backup then you are trying to choose a perfectly reliable SSD. Because none of them are perfectly reliable, and it only takes a bit of bad luck and you lose your data.

Hard drives are also vulnerable.

#11 demto

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 09:43 AM

I know that backing up regulary is important. I have done it but perhaps not as often as I should.

I know that HDD's and SDD's have their problems but I confess I didn't know ssd's had problems until mine
failed. You live and learn.



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